Father Abraham. (Reading, Pa.) 1864-1873, November 26, 1869, Image 1

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    PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY,
RAUCH & COCHRAN,
No. 13, South queen Street, Lancaster.
TERMS OF SI-BsCRIPTIO:4I
I copy, one ?poi
5 copteT, (each norne addressed.)
IO copies
15 copies '• ‘•
•
:20 cop ie.c 22.00
And 4130 for each additional sulytacriber.
FOR CLUBS, IN PACK APES
5 copies., (to one addre.e.vo $ 6.50
10 copies " 12.00
15 copies " 18.50
`..11 copies 20.00
And 31.00 for each additional subscriber.
Ep-All subscriptions must invariably be paid
in advance.
.TOYSTI, IC N'r NGr
Of every description, neatly and promptly exe
crated, at short notice, and ou the most
reasonable terms.
Railroads.
pENNSYLVANIA CENTRAL R. R.
On and after Monday, Nov. 15th, 1869, trains
will leave the Pena , a Railroad Depot, at Lan
caster, as follows:
WESTWARD.
EASTWARD. I)*
Pittsburg Ex.12:51 a.m. Cineiu. Ex.-12:15W nu.
Pacific..........2:40 " IPhila. Express 3:40 "
Emigrant Tr. 4.23 " Fast Line 6:42 "
Mail 11:15 " Lune. Train. ...9:30 "
Mail No. 2, via Columbia Ac. : :
" (arrive! 115 p.
Fast Line 2:35 p.m. Pacific Express
Columbia Ac... 2:45 ' I (1eave)......... 1:35 "
liarrisb'g Ac. 5:54 " !Southern Ex
Lnnc. Train.. 7:34 " ; (leave). ...... .
Clnein. Ex....10:50 '` ' Flarrisb , g Ac
(leave) • 5:54 "
READING RAILROAD.
FALL ARRANGEMENT,
MONDAY, SEPT 13, 1869
G rad Trunk Line f rout the North and North
west for Philadelphia, New York, Bead
ing, Pottsville, Tamaqua, Ashland, Sha
mokin, Lebanon, Allentown, Easton Eph
rata, Litz, Lancaster, Columbia, A te.
Trains leave Harrisburg for New York M fol
lows: Att2.lo, 5.20, 8.10, 9.40 a. m., 2 and 4.45
p m.., connecting with similar trains on the
Pennsylvania Railroad, and arriving at New,
York at 10.00 a. m.,11.45 a. in., 3.55, 9.95, 10.20 p.m.
respectively. Sleeping Cars accompany the 2.10
and 5.20 a.m. trains without change.
Leave Harrisburg for Reading, Pottsville,
Titulary:la, Millersville, Ashland, Shamokin,
Pine Grove, Allentown and Philadelphia at
8.10 a. m., 2.00 and 4.10 p. m., stopping at Leba
non and principal Way Stations; the 4.10 p. m.
train making connections for Philadelphia,
Pottsville and Columbia only. For Pottsville,
Schuylkill Haven and Auburn, via Schuylkill
and Susquehanna Railroad, leave Harrisburg
at 3.40 p. in.
Returning: Leave New York at 900 a. m., 12.00
noon, 5.00 and 8.00 p. in., Philadelphia at 8.15 a.
M. and 3.30 p. In.; sleeping cars accompany the
9.00 a. in. 5.00 and 8.00 p. in. trains from New
York, without change.
Way Passenger Train leaves Philadelphia at
7.30 a. in., connecting with similar train on East
Penna. Railroad, returning from Reading at
8.39 p. In., stopping at all stations; leave Potts
ville at 540, 9 00 a. m., and 2.45 p. m.; Herndon at
9 .30 a. m., Shamokin at 5.40 and 10.55 a.m.; Ash
land at 7.95 a. m. and 12.30 noon, Tamaqua at
8.33 a. in.: and 2.20 p. In., for Philadelphia and
New York.
Leave l'ottsville, via Schuylkill and Susque
hanna Railroad at 8.15 a. in. for liarrisburg,and
11.30 a. In. for Pine Grove and Tremont.
. .
Reading Accommodation Train: Leaves
Pottsville at 5.40 a. in., passes Reading at 7:30 a.
arriving at Philadelphia at 10.13 a. in., return
ing leaves Philadelphia at 6:15 p. m.
Pottstown Accommodation Train: Leaves
Pottstown at 6.25 a. in.; returning, leaves Phila
delphia at 4.30 p. m.
Columbia Railroad Trains leave Reading at
7.15 a. In. and 6.15 p. in. for Ephrata, Lit is, Lan
caster, Columbia, fte.
Perklemon Railroad Trains leave Perklowan
Junction at 9.00 a in. 6.00 and 3.15 p. m.• return
ing, leave SchwerdiVillb at 5.55, B.ta nr: and
12.55 noon, connecting, with similar trains on
Reading Railroad.
Colebrookdale Railroad trains leave .Potts
town at 9.40 a. in-, and 6.50 p.returning, leave
Boyerstown at 7.25 a. in., and 11.50 flood con
nect tug with similar trains on Reading R. R.
Chester Valley Railroad trains leave Bridge
port at 8 45 a. in., anti 11 20 and 5.3.5 p. m., return
ing, leave Downingtown at 6.10 a. m., 1.00 and
5.45 p. m., connecting with trains on Reading
Railroad.
. .
On Sundays: Leave New York at 5.00 and 8.00
p. in., Philadelphia at 8.00 a. in. and 3.15 p.
the (4.00 n. M. train running only to Rearing,)
leave Pottsville H.W a. in.; Harrisburg 5.20 u.
410 and 4.45 p. in., and Reading at 12.35, mid
night, and 7.15 a. in. for Harrisburg, ftt 7.05 a. in.
and 6.17 p. m., for New York and at 9.40 a. M. and
4.25 p. in. for Philadelphia.
Commutation, Mileage, Season, School and
Excursion Tickets, to and front all points, at
reduced rates.
Baggage checked 1 h rough ; 100 pounds allowed
each Passenger
General Superintendent.
Haeuiso, PA, Sept. 13th, Ism, rocts-tf
READING AND COLUMBIA R. F.
WINTER AR 12 ANO EMENT
ON AND AFTER
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22d, 1869,
PASSENGER TRAINS WILL RUN ON THIS
ROAD, AS FOLLOWS
LEAVE. ARRAY&
Lancaster 815 a. m. Reading 10:30 a. ni
IS 3.10 p. m. " ..... 610 p. m
Columbia .....Bdo a. m. ig 1040 a. m
14 3.00 p.m. " 5:110 p. m
RETURNING:
LW/. ARMY).
Beading ..... 70.0 Lc In. Laacaater.....9:2s a. M.
" ..... 6:15 p. m. it
.....8:26 p.m.
4; 7:15 a. m. Columbia .....9:116 a. m.
" ..... 6:15 p. m. 411
.....800 p. m.
Trains leaving Lancaster and Columbia as
above, make close conneetion at Reading with
Trains North and &milli on Philadelpha and
aftdinig Railroad, and West on Lebanon Valley ,
Rend. Train leaving tancasterat 8:15 A. X. and
Columbia at 8:10 A. M. connects closely at Read
ing with Train tor New York.
Tickets can he obtained at the oMoes of the
Now Jersey Central Railroad, foot of Liberty
street , New York; and Philadelphia and Reading
Railroad lath and Callowhill streets, Phila.
Through tickets to New York and Philadel
phia sold at all the Principal Stations, and Bag
gage Checked Through.
MI-Mileage Ticket Books for 500 or 1000 miles,
Season and - Excursion Tickets, to and from all
points, at reduced rates.
Trains are run by Philadelphia and Reading
Railroad Time, which is 10 minutes faster than
Pennsylvania Railroad Time.
nova-N-tf] GRO. V. GAGE. Si.
Coal, Lumber, &e.
ES ER, BRENEMAN & CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALERS IN
COAL, OF THE BEST QUALITY
YARD-(:OR. WATER ST. AND PA. R. R
Orna•--NO. 9 EAST ORANGE ST.,
LANCASTER PA.
B. D. MARTIN, HISIDICRT THOMAS, JOHN S. MASON
5,000,000
FEET OF DRY LUMBER.
MARTIN, THOMAS & CO.,
COLUMBIA, LANCASTER CO., Ps.,
Manufacturers
At LOCK If A VEN, CLINTON COUNTY, PA..
AND W HOL MAL E
LUMBER DEALERS•
WHITE PINE HEMLOCK.
POPLAR E WALNUT ASH,
FLOORING, SID ING, WEATHER BOARDS,
PICKETS, LATH,
BOX BOARDS, La. La
abli•ly]
$l.BO
7.00
13.00
18.00
VOL. 111
AUG. REINOERL, JAC. REINORTIL, JR.
A & J. REINOEHL,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS
JAPAN
VARNISHES,
LINSEED (IL,
TURPENTINE, ac., &e.
ND. 109 NORTH QUEEN STREET,
(In the Keystone Building,)
. LANCASTER, PA.
4:10 "
Also, Mahogany Boards, Veneers and
Mouldings of difibrent sizes and pat
terns. All kinds of Turning, such
as Bed Posts, Table Legs,
Spokes, flubs, Felloes,
&c., &c .
Also, AXLES, SPRINGS, ke
Ertrroatt EXPRIM: Dr. Wm. M. Whiteside, the
enterprising Dentist, has purchased from me a
large stock of teeth and all the fixtures, the in
struments formerly belonging to me, and also
those used by my father, Dr. Parry, in his prac
tice. In the purchase, the doctor has provided
himself with some of the most valuable and ex
pensive instruments used in dental practice,
and has beyond doubt one of the best and lar
gest oollections of teeth and instruments in the
State. Persons visiting the commodious offices
of Dr. Whiteside, cannot fail to be fully accom
modated. The Doctor loses no opportunity of
furnishing himself with every late scientific
improvement In his line of business.
li. fl. PARRS.
W . M. WHITESIDE,
DENTIST.
Next door to the Court House, over Fahnes
Teeth Extracted without pain by the use of
(Nitrous Oxide) Gas.
no3o-tf
I House _Furnishing Goods.
=I
H ERRING'S CHAMPION SAFES
PHII.AD/LPHI•, Sept. 1, 1869.
MigliF , R.4. FA It RFT., HEARING 12 CO., 619 Cheat
nut street.
GENTLZICHN : We have jest examined, with
the very greatest satisftetton, our Safe, pur
chased of you some years ago, and which pass
ed through our destructive - fire laet night.
We find the contents, without exceplien, en
tirely unharmed, merely slightly damp, and we
feel now in a oondition to °immense our busi
ness again, having every boot perfectly safe.
We yhall in a few days require a larger one,
and will mU upon you.
JAMES EARLE SON 4.
Pat LADELPHIA, ; Aug." IRS).
MICEIBIO. FARREL, HERRING k CO.
GHINTLISIss: the year IdM, I unfortunately
was In business in. the Artisan Building, which
was destroyed by fire ou the 10th of April. I
bad then In uslii what I sopposed waif is • Fire
proof Safe, but upon opening it I found every
thing was destroyed, and fire burning therein.
Yon will recollect. gentlemen, there were
several of your Safes in that fire, also several in
the fire at Sixth and Commerce streets, the next
May, five weeks afterwards, all of Which upon
being opened proved they were tire-proof in-
deed, for I witnessed the opening of the most
of theta, and in every case the contents were
preserved, while Sates of other matters were
partially or entirely destroed. lat once con
eluded to haVe something t hat I could depend
upon, and purchased one of your Safes.
The Safe I purchased of
(which that time was
subjected to a white heat was witnessed
by several gentlemen that reside in the neigh
borhood) at the destruction of my Marble raper
Factory, 811 Wallace street, on the afternoon
and evening of the 44th Inst. After digging the
Safe from the ruins, and opening it this morn
ing, I was much pleasoito find everytkingoon
sisting of books, papers, money and silverware
all right. I shall want another of your Safes as
soon as I can get a place to continue my busi
ness in. I could not rest contented with any
other make of safes.
CHABLICS W ILLIAMS,
Marble raper Manufacturer.
[deo 18-17
lIERBINU'S PATENT CHAMPION SAFES,
the most reliable protection from the now
known. H.ERRINGrzi NEW PATENT' BANK
ERS' SAFES, combining hardened steel and
iron, with the Patent Frankilnite, or SPIEGEL
EISEN, famish a resistant against boring and
cutting tools to an extent heretofore unknown.
FARREL, HERRING A CO., PHILADELPHIA
HERIONO. FAURE!. AL FiIiKIIIMAN, NO. 951
outa•1y•1 NNW 0R11.11A116
to see the right, let us strive on to finish the 'pork
sve are in; to billed up the nations wounds; to
Marshes, &c.
IN
COPAL, WHITE, COFFIN, BLACK AND
Dentistry.
LANorrEn, Juno 251 h, 1868
IFFICE AND RESIDENCE,
EA.T KING STREET,
took's Dry Goods Store,
LANCASTER, PENNA
Safes.
THE BURNING 0.14' EABLES'
A RT GALLERY
HigoADWAY. (20R. MURRAY ST
NI W YORK
HICELRING & CO., CHICAGO
HERRING, FARREL A, SHERMAN,
JOB PRINTING.
THE BEST AND CHEAPEST PLACE
[Jan g-lyr
JOB PRINTING DONE,
FATHER ABRAHAM OFFICE,
sorrn QUEEN STREET,
Two D00r, , , North of Express Office
POSTERS,
PROGRAMMES,
HAND-BILLS,
CARDS,
Will null it to their interest to give us ft call
RAUCH & COCHRAN,
I'iEWSPAPEII, BOOK ANO JOB PRINTERS,
ME
Hats, Caps, Pars, dec.
SMITH & AMER,
PRACTICAL HATTERS,
EAST KING ST., LANCASTER, PA.,
Manufacturers and Dealers an
♦LL SUMO OF
HATS AND CAPS.
All orders promptly attended to.
augl3-ly j
1888.
SHULTZ & BROTHER,
NO. 20 NORTH QUEEN STREET
Latest style Fall and Winter HATS and OAPS
iu all qualities aid coloLe.
LADIES' FANCY FURS,
Wo are now opening the largest and most
ompleteaiwortment of ladies' and Chi'area's
FANCY Fcras ever offered in this market, at
very low prices,
ROBES! ROBES!! SOBER!:.'
Buffalo Robes, lined and unlined; godson Bay
Wolf, Prairie Wolf, Fox, Coon, &o.
BLANKETS AND LAP RUGS
Of all qualities, to which we would particularly
invite the attention of all , persona in want of
articles in that line.
GLOVES, GAUNTLETS and MITTS
OTTER
BRAVER.
HIITHIA
ICK
115
RSH UVRIII,
IMICR,
KID, Le., £0
Ladles , Fine Fur Trimmed Glovgs , Gauntlets
Mitts and Hoods.
PULSE WARMERS and E4ll, MITTS.
ni)2o-tfWIIOI4IBALN AND REVAIL
IL 8. HOTEL,
OPPOSITII PINNA. R. R. D 11,07,
W. 11. EMMIIWER & 00.,
Proprietors.
4Y for
=
LANCASTER, PA., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1869.
Printing.
To get all kinds of
IS AT THE
No. 13
IT,I, IN WANT OF
DILL-HEADS,
LETTER-HEADS,
BLANK CHECKS,
PAMPHLEOr`
NOTES, /tC
LANCASTER, PA
No. V.,'
F. SMITH,
CHAS. H. AMER
HATTICRS,
LANCASTER, PENN A
Hetet&
RAZILIBIFIntIa; PA
care for him 'rho shall have borne the battle, and
for his Avidon , and his orphan, to do all whieh may
achieve and cherish a just and a lasting
.peace
among" ourselves and with till nations."—.l. L.
ON GRUMBLING.
This world has its roses and thorns,
Made up of both pleasure and sorrow,
And often the saddest to-day
Is found to be joyful to-morrow ;
Bo varied the changes we see
While twenty-fonr hours are gliding,
That wiser that mortals will be,
Prepared for whatever betiding.
Then halt not, though rough be the ground—
They fall who are fearful of stumbling ;
As hard as your lot may be found,
Did you ever know good come by grumbling?
The man who cloth rise with the lark,
And seeks, like the bee, for the honey,
Finds something turn up before dark
That brings to the pocket the money.
The soil must be tilled for the grain,
The net must be cast for the fishes,
And only by striving, 'tis plain,
Will fortune fell in with our wishes.
Then halt not, though rough be the ground—
They fall who are fearful of stumbling;
And hard as your lot may be found,
Did you ever know good come by grumbling?
Don't always depend on your friends,
Who By at the tidings of sorrow,
But rather your puree touch with care,
And see that it yields for the morrow ;
In fact, be a friend to yourself,
And thus by self-etibrt succeeding,
You soon unto others can say,
"Many thanks, but your aid I'm not need
ing."
Then halt not, though rough be the ground—
They fall who are fearful of stumbling ;
And hard as your lot may be found,
Did you ever know geed come by grumbling?
Piot!tattoo.
THE BARONESS AND ROBBERS.
In a pretty village near Paris, but a
considerable distance from the high road,
was Baron lt. accustomed to spend the
summer. his mansion, built on an emi
nence, was a spacious building, both
within and without, and exhibited a good
style .of architecture; and it was about 200
paces from the village.
Business obliged the Baron to take a
journey of a few days. His wife, but
twenty years of age, and very beautiful,
remained at home. He took with him
his servants, and two others remained
with the baroness. No violation of the
'public security had ever been heard of
in that part of the country, and as the
baroness did not belong to the timid por
tion of her sex, the idea of danger was far
from entering her mind. The evening
after the baron's departure, as she was
stepping into bed, she heard an alarming
noise in an apartment near her chamber.
She called out, but received no answer.
The Lonfusion increased every moment.
She was at a loss to conceive what was
the matter, and hastily putting on her
garments, went to the door to discover
the cause. A horrible spectacle presented
itself. Her two servants, half-naked,
were stretched lifeless on the floor. The
room was full of strange-looking men; the
baroness' chambermaid was kneeling be
fore one of them, and instead of the mercy
she implored, she received the fatal stroke.
No sooner did the door open than two
barbarians, with drawn swords, rushed
toward it. What woman, or• even man,
would not have been struck with the ut
most terror and given up life and every
thing else as lost? A loud shriek of de
spair, a flight of a few paces, would
probably have been the resort of many.
The baroness, however, conducted herself
in a different manner. •
"And you have come at last, ,, exclaim
ed she, in a tone of apparently heartfelt
joy; and advancing toward her assailants
with a histe that highly astonished them,
they lowered their uplifted weapons.
"And you have come at last," repeated
she; "such visitors as you I have often
wished to sec.',
18M.
"Wished," muttered one of the assas
sins, "what do you mean by that? But
He had already raised hin cutlass, but
a comrade averted the stroke. "Stay a
moment, brother," said he, "and let us
hear what she would have."
"Nothing but what is your pleasure,
bravo comrades. You are men after my
own heart, and neither you nor I shall
ever have reason to repent it, if you will
listen for two minutes to what I have to
say."
"Speak ! speak !" cried the whole corn
pa,ny.
`But be quick," added one of the fier
cest, "for we shall not make much cere
mony."
"Nevertheless, I hope you will grant
me a hearing; for although I am the wife
of the richest gentleman in the country,
the wife of the meanest beggar cannot be
more unhappy than I am. My husband
is one of the most jealous and niggardly
fellows on earth. hate him, and it has
long been the fervent wish of my heart to
get clear of his ditches and at the same
time pay off old scores. All my servants
were sines; and that fellow whose business
you have done so completely, was the
worst of all. lam scarce twenty-one, and
I flatter myself far from being ugly. If
any of you choose to take me along with
you, vri accompany you to the woods or
the village ale house. Nor shall any of
you repent having spared my life. You
are in a well stored mansion; but it is im
possible that you to acquainted with all
its secret corners. These I will qow show
you, anti if I don't make you richer by six
thousand dollars, then serve me as you did
my chambermaid."
Robbers of this kind arc certainly vil
liens, but nevertheless they are still men.
The wholly unexpected tenderness of the
baroness, added to the more than ordinary
beauty of the female, altogether produced
a powerful effect on these men, whose
fad%
hands were yet reeking with blood. They
then all stepped aside, and consulted to
gether in low tones for some minutes.
The baroness was left quite alone, but she
betrayed not the least wih to escape.
"Let's dispatch her,And the game will
b 3 all up." She, however, scarcely chang
ed color, for the opposition of the others
did not escape her acute ear.
Ono, who was probably captain of the
banditti, now approached he Ile asked
twice or thrice whether he might rely on
what she said—whether she actually
wished to be released from the tyranny of
her husband, to go with them—and wheth
er she was willing to resign herself to one
of them, to himself for instance, during
the peaceful days they could obtain. Hav
ing replied in the affirmative to all these
questions—having not only suffered the
warm embrace of the robber, but returned
it—for what will not necessity excuse ?
he at length said :
" Come along, then, and lead us around.
The d-1 trust your ladies of rank, but we
will venture for once. But let me tell you,
if you were twice as handsome as you are,
this weapon should cleave your skull the
moment I saw the least disposition to be
tray us ?"
" Then it will be safe enough : and if
this were the only condition of my being
put to death, I should outlive you all, and
even the wandering Jew himself."
The baroness smiled when she pro
nounced these words, and hastily caught
the nearest lamp as if she were as eager
as any of them to collect the plunder and
be gone. She conducted the company
through every apartment, opened every
door, every drawer, and every chest, as
sisted in picking up the valuables, looking
with the utmost indifference at the man
gled bodies ; speaking with the familiari
ty of au old acquaintance to each one of
the horrid troup, and assisting with her
delicate hands in the most laborious occu
pation.
Plate, money, jewels, were collected to
gether, and the captain of the banditti was
about giving the order for marching, when
his destined bride caught him by the arm,
" Did I not tell you," said she, " that you
should not repent making a friend of me
and sparing my life ? You may, indeed,
have everything in places you had open ;
but it is a pity that you cannot come at
places coucepled. What you suppose
hat aniong: cdtllt3 ` there are no
secret places ? Look here, and then you
will be convinced to the contrary."
She pointed to a settret spEpag in the
baron's desk. They pressedbpi - it it and
out fell live bags of gold coin.
" Zounds !" cried the leader of the rob
bers;" now I s;te you are an in oniparable
woman, and I will keep you for this as a
dutehess
"And perhaps, better still," said she,
laughing, " when I show you one thing
more. Imu well aware that you must
have spies who in ed you of the ab
sence of my tyre tut they di of tell
you of the fifty t .and francsaWreceiv
ed yesterday."
Where are they ?"
" 0, safe enough under halt a dozen of
locks and bolts. You would certainly not
have found them and the iron chest had
it not been for me. Come along, com
rades ; we have finished above stairs, now
we will see what can be done underneath.
Come along with me, I say, into the cel
lar."
The robbers followed but not without
precaution. At the entrance of the teller,
secured by a strong trap door, a man was
posted as a sentinel. She conducted the
whole troop to a vault at the farther end
of the cellar. She unlocked it, and in the
corner of this recess stood the cheat she
had described. •• Here," said, she giving
the captain a bunch of keys, " unlock it
and take out what you find as a wedding
gift, if you can gain the consent of your
comrades as readily as you obtained
mine."
The robber tried one key after another
none would fit. lie grew impatient, and
the baroness seemed still more so.
"frond me them," said she, "I will find
the way sooner. Indeed, if you do not
make haste i the morning may overtake us.
Ha I the reason why neither of us could
unlock it, is bemuse I have the wrong
bunch of keys, I will obtain another."
She went up stairs, and presently they
heard her coming down, but she came
slowly, as if out of breath with the haste
she had made.
"I've found them," cried she at a dis
tance. Then coming up to within about
three paces of the man at the entrance of
the cellar, she sprang suddenly at the
wretch, who was totally unprepared for
such a move from such a quarter, and
pushing him with all her might, sent him
tumbling to the bottom of the stairs. This
accomplished, she closed the trap door,
bolted it, and thus had the whole com
pany secured in the cellar. This was the
work of a single moment. In the next
she flew across the court yard, and with a
candle in her hand set fire to a detached
pig sty. The watchmen in the neighbor
ing village, rwrviving the flames, instant
ly gave the alarm. In a few minutes the
inhabitants were out of their beds, and a
crowd of farmers, with their servants, has
tened to the mansion. The baroness
waited for them at the gate of the court
yard.
" A few of you," said she, "will be
sufficient to put out this fire and to pre
vent it from spreading ; but now provide
yourselves with arms, which you will find
to abundance in my husband's armory.
Post yourselv( s at the avenues of the
cellar, and suffer not one of the robbers
and murderers to escape."
Tier directions were obeyed, and not
one of them escaped the punishment due
to his crimes.
CASH RATES OF ADVERTISING
IN FATHER ABRAHAM.
Tel. 1 i Nonpanqleonstitote a Square
O ; lzr •
•
TIME, 7 . c f; 5-7 u 76
_,
el
I week.... $ 75 •1405210 $ 3 50 $ 6 004 11 50
2 weeks... 120 ISO 270 450• 8 00 14 CO
3 weeks... 150 220 3 30 , 600 10 09 , 17 00
I month... 175 280 3 00; 700 11001 20 00
2 months.., 275 409 600 10 00 20 00 , 83 60
3 months..' 4 CO' 800 OOM 15 00 30 00 66 00
6 months.. 7 00, 11 00 18 50 26 00, 40 00 70 90
1 year 12 00 20 00 30 00A0 001 60 001 120 90
• • .22 60
~. 69
2 60
Executors' Notice
Administrators' Notice
Assigned' Notice...
EMI
tors , Notice
SPECIAL NOTICES—Ten cents k line for the
first insertion, and Seven cents a line for each
subsequent insertion.
REAL ESTATE advertisements, Ten °ants a
line for the flit insertion and Five cents& Ime
for each additional insertion.
/J-ALL KINDS or JOB PRINTING exeented
with neatness and despatch.
NO. 2.
t Mint. 4braham's Chip.
SIXTEEN pereons were killed by a col
lision on the Pacific Railroad last. week.
In California an orchard of 25,000 pear
trees are just bearing.
Ix California the favorite weapon of
the Chinamen is an iron bar covered with
c vacs.
THE Pennsylvania Legislature meets
on the :first Tuesday in January, which
will be the 4th of the month.
PROVIDENCE, R. 1., is agitating the
question of admitting colored children in
the Sabbath Schools.
THE Copperhead papers are taking
ground in favor of the exclusion of the
Bible from the public schools.
BowNEit has a young horse, called the
" Bogart Colt," which is said to have
trotted a mile, to a wagon in 2191.
P.►PER is entering into nearly every
thing we use. The Yankees now make it
into pails, washtubs and spittoons.
THE lion. Edward McPherson, Clerk
of the House of Representatives, has just.
returned from a trip to Europe, greatly
improved in health.
MAROATIET BECK has recovered $1.7,-
000 damages from tt-e Northern Central
Railroad for killing her husband by crush
ing him between two cars at Baltimore
last year.
THE assessment of real and person&
property in Philadelphia for 1870 has Just
been completed, and amounts to i , 411,-
600,305—an increase over last year of
$17,489,742.
EN E3I lES are as necessary to the prope:
development of the full-grown man as
friends. When lived that man that
amounted to anything but could count
his enemies by the scores ?
THE Red Stocking Base Ball Club, of
Cincinnati has played sixty games with
picked nines during the past season, in all
parts of the country, and has not been
beaten once.
A WAsfircol'ox dispatch reports that
Hon. Amos Kendall left $25,000 to each
of his grand-children, with the exception
of one, to whom he gave but $lO,OOO be
cause he was in the Confederate army.
Hex. Moszoxt liclitichum,,exp?ittayor
of Philadelphia, has returned from his ex
tended European tour, much benefitted by
his sojourn abroad.
Tilt; world produces 713,000,000 pounds
of coffee per annum. Brazil furnishes
over one half of this. •lava comes next,
and Ceylon next in the amount yielded.
THE Supreme Court at Cincinnati has
decided that a man has a right to restrain
his wife from a second marriage by mak
ing his bequests dependent upon her re
maining a widow.
"DEMOCRACY," says the Louisvilh•
Courier-Journal, "is not 'treason." Just
so; but it is next door neighbor to trea
son, and on too familiar terms with it to
be trusted.
SEVEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY THOU
SAND letters passed through the mails
last year, which is an increase of forty
millions over the previous one. This is
an average of twenty letters for Apt indi
vidual in the country.
STATISTICS show that about twenty
letters per head aro written annually in
the United States. During the past year,
upwards of 760,000,000 letters passej
through the mails, or an increase of 40,-
000,000 over that of any previous year.
TILE Wilmington ' Gazette says:
Wm. G. Jones, one of our oldest and most
respected citizens, who has followed his
business as a cabinet maker and under
taker for more than half a century, in
formed us a few days since that, be had
hurled 6,875 persons in this. city, a greeter
number than 4ouWe the population of the
town when he commenced business. He
is 85 years of age.
GoLD contilues to fluctuate, but on a
narrow . margin; for the past few day. be
tween 126 and 127. The bull ring butted
a wall when they rushed gold up to 165,
causing the United States Treasurer or,
as is alleged, President Grant to issue an
order to "sell five millions." Since that
disastroue day gold gamblers have been
extremely careful, and rings have grown
quii,e shy.
lowA is larger than New York or Penn
sylvania—larger than New England,
without Maine and mote productive
than all of them put together. She has
35,000,000 acres of rich, black mould, and
to-day a clean furrow can be turned over
30,000,000 of these acres. Although less
than 5,000.000 are under cultivation, they
produced last year 85,000,000 bushels of
grain.
THE Williamsport Slander,/ having
been used up politically by the October
election,
now devotes a portion of its col
umns to assailing the pulpit. It gives
long prayers a sly hit, perpetrates a joke
on a clergyman, and accuses the clergy
generally of preaching the "Radical gos
pel.” The devil and the Standard agree
with singular unanimity on the last point.
We next expect to hear of its rejection of
the Billie, on account of radical clauses.
JUDGE HUGH BRECKENRIDGE of the
Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, the witty
author of " Modern Chivalry," whillit
riding through \Westmoreland county,
saw a girl who was going out to milk the
cows, place her 113E141 on the top rail of a
fence and spring over. "If you can do
that again, my girl, I will marry yqu."
The girl did so. The Judge dismounted,
saw the parents of the girl, and told than
Out ho would undertake the education of
their daughter and - afterwards marry her,
, which was done •
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