Father Abraham. (Reading, Pa.) 1864-1873, July 23, 1869, Image 1

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    PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY,
RAUCH & COCHRAN,
No. 13, south Queen Street, Lanaister.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
copy, One year, $ 1.50
10
copies, (each "
6 name addresseel,) 18.00 7.00
copies 4
16copies " 6C 18.00
20 copies " •• 22.00
And $l.lO for each additional subscriber.
voa ctuas, IN PACIAOIIII.
copies, (to cute addriess,) $ 6.50
10 copies 19.06
15 copies " II 16.50
26 copies " II 23.00
And $l.OO for each additional subscriber.
All subscriptions must invariably be paid
in advance.
JOB PRINTING
Of every description, neatly and promptly exe
cuted, at short notice, and on the most
reasonable terms.
Railroads.
PENNSYLVANIA CENTRAL R. R.
The time of the arrival and departure of the
trains on the Pennsylvania Railroad, at Lan
caster, has been changed, as follows :
WIISTWASD.
'Pittsburg Ex. 1:27 a. m
!Mall
IPhila. Exp...
11:15 2:39 "
"
'Fast Line 2:85 p.m
Columbia Ao. 5:45 "
Harrisbl Ac. 5:54 "
Lane. Train.. 7:40
Cincin. Ex....10:38 "
'ASTI/VAR%
Mein. Ex....12:07 a. m.!
Phils.itzpress 4:09 44
Fast Line 6:35 "
UM,. Train.. 8:58 " I
Day Express. 1:40 p.m.
Harrisbl Ae..1:51 "
Southern Ex-4:00 "
READMG RAILROAD.
SUMMER ARRANGEMENT,
MONDAY, APRIL 96, 1890.
Great Trunk Linefrom the North and North
west for Philadelphia New York, Read
ing, Pottsville, Tamaqua, Ashland, Sha
mokin, Lebanon, Allentown, Easton, Eph
rata, Litiz, Lancaster, Columbia, et, t.
Trains leave Harrisburg for New York as fol
lows: At 2.35, 6.90, 8.10 a. m., 12.25 noon 2.00 and
10.66 D . m., connecting with similar trains on the
Pennsylvania Railroad, and striving at New
York at 1.:16 a. m.,1145 a. m., 3.60, 6.66, 9.30 p.m.,
and 6 . 00 a. in. respectively. Sleeping Cars ao•
company the 235,6.20 a. in. and 10.66 p.m. trains
without °liana°.
Leave Harrisburg for Reading, Pottsville,
Tamaqua, Idinenralle, Ashland, Shamokin,
Pine Grove , Allentown and Ph il adelphia, at
8.10 a. m., 2.00 and 4.10 p. m., stopping at Leba
non and principal Way Stations; the 4.10 p. m.
train making connections for Philadelphia,
Pottsville and Columbia only. For Pottsville,
Schuylkill Haven and Auburn, via tichuylkill
and Susquehanna Railroad, leave Harrisburg
at 3.30 p. m.
Returning: Leave New York at 9.00 a. m. 19.00
noon, 6.05 and 8.00 p. Philadelphia at 8.15 a.
In. and 8.80 p. m.; sleeping oars aecompany the
9.00 a. m., 6.06 and 8.00 p. m. trains from Now
York, without change.
Way Passenger Train leaves Philadelphia at
7.30 a. in, connecting with similar train on East
Penna. Railroad, returning from Reading at
6.30 p. M. stopping at all stations; leave Potts
vile at 710, 846 a. m., and 146 pin.; Shamokin
at 5.26 and 10.85 a. m.; Ashland at 7..00 a.m., and 12.80
noon, Tamaqua at 8.30 a. in.; and 2.20 p. in., for
Philadelphia and New York.
Leave Pottsville, via Schuylkill and Susque
hanna Railroad at nt. for Harrisburg, and
11.30 a. m. for Pine °rove and Tremont.
Reading Accommodation Train : Leaves
Reading at 7:30 a. m., returning leaves Phila
delphia at 5:16 p. m.
Pottstown Accommodation Troia: Leaves
Pottstown at 8.25 a. m.; returning, leaves Phila
delphia at 4.30 p. in.
Columbia Railroad Trains leave Reading at
7.00 a. m. and 8.15 p. in. for Ephrata, Wiz, Lan
caster, Columbia, an.
Perkiomen Railroad Trains leave Perklomen
Junction at 9.00 a. m. and 8.00 p. m. , returning,
leave Skippack at 8.16 a. m. and 1.00 p. m., con
necting with similar trains on Reading Rail
road.
On Sundays: Leave New Yo k at 8.00 p. m., Philadelphia at tee a. m. np„, the
S k pe .13L\ttldia
'n 1 / 4 e
8.00 a. , 3.12:1
10.53 p. m., and Reading at 11.65, midnight, 2.54
and 7.15 a. in. For Harrisburg, at 12.65 midnight,
and 7.05 a. m . for New York; and at 9.40 a. in. and
4.25 p. in. for Philadelphia.
Commutation, Mileage, Season, School and
Excursion Tickets, to and from all pointa, at
educed rates.
Boggsge checked through; 100 pounds allowed
each Passenger. -
G. A. NICOLLS,
(loners' Superintendent.
Ram:non, PA., April 26,1%8. [sprllBo-ltdaw
READING AND COLUMBIA R. R.
ON AND AFTER
THURSDAY, APRIL 15th, 1869,
PASSENGER TRAINS WILL BE RUN ON THIS
ROAD, AS FOLLOWS:
Lancaster Bi)s a. M. Beading a. in.
if 3.10 p. m. " 510 p.m
Columbia .....8:00 a. in. " 10:20 a. tn.
a BAO p. m. " 510 p. m.
RETURNING:
Reading 7too a. in. Lancaster.....9:l6 a. in.
..... 6:16p. m. 41 . • —8:26 p.m.
" 7:00 a. in. Columbia .....9:25 a. in.
" 0:16 p. m. " .....8:80 p. m.
Trains leaving Lancaster and Columbia as
above, make close connection at Reading with
Trains North and Sout__,li• on Philadelphft and
Readinff Railroad, and West on Lebanon Valley
Road. Train leaving Lancaster at 8:06 A. X. and
Columbia at 8 A. M. connects closely at Reading
with Train for New York.
Tickets can beobtalned at the Ornoes of the
lkw Jersey Central Railroad, foot of Liberty
eet, New York; and Philadelphia and Reading
Railroad, 18th and Callowhill streets, Phila.
'Through tickets to Nest York and Philadel
phia sold at all the Principal Stations, and Bag
gage Checked Through.
.p-Mileage Ticket Books for 500 or 1000 miles,
Season and Excursion Tickets, to and from all
points, at reduced rates.
Trains are run by Philadelphia and Reading
Railroad Time, whieh is 10 ncluntes faster than
Pennsylvania HAilroliAl Time.
apl la•M•tfl OZO. Y. GAGE, Sup: •
NORTHERN CENTRAL RAIL
WAY.
Trains leave York for Wrightsville aad yr
tumid*, at 6:20 and 11:40 a. m., and LSO p. m.
Leave Wrightsville for York, at 8110 a. m. an;
1:00 and M6op. m.
Leave York for Baltimore, at 5:00 and 1:
m, 1:05 p. m.; sad_lt mklnlght.
Lam York for Harrisburg, at 14111, 0.111 an I
a. m., and 20 and MS
TBALWB LEAVE HABBISBURG.
sago mopes.
At Bo* a. m., and.4lslosion 4111 p.
mama adirms.
.4.241 5:1111 a. an., sad 12:1110 and loglip
4 114fd
Musical Instrument:, &C.
T B. KEVINSKI,
/AUL= /X
SHEET MUSIC, PIANOS, ORGANS,
MELODEONS,
And Musical instruments Generally.
Sole Agent for
STEINWAY £ SONS'
WORLD RENOWNED PIANOS.
Also, Agent for
PRINCE i C 0.% ORGANS and MRIADEONS
gg-Mnsto sent by Mail Free of Postage.
No. $ NORTH PRINCE STREET
A
Lanes ate,,
--;.1...",....
GOOK AMOHL DOH
Rooft am iin
J. B. SEVINBICI BEIM MUSIC BUTOBB.
raossziou, Onyx Numosseirs Ina alle
aorta music Installments! '
Der Kevinskt Is agent for de beresrmty Stein
wehr Pianorillofinors boast nor so at deftsk.
Der plats is
No. a NORD PRINCE STREET, LANCASTER.
N. B. For a first raty goofy Gas iri ciddisr an
Aooordeon, odder a Tswaerrtob.P odd er es ,
Mob onners musical Insbtrument, es add er
gross, ebtept pasta ai ons Ilindaldrps, No.
Nord Prince Shtram Loaoastor. (nolo.ly
to see the right, let us strb'e on to finish the 'pork
?Pe are in; to bind up the nations 'pounds; to
VoL. 11.
Claim Agency.
JAMES BLACK,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
• AND
MILITARY AND NAVAL CLAIM AGENT,
No. 56 East King-st., Lancaster, Pa.
Being duly licensed as a Claim Agent, and
having a large experience, prompt attention
will be given to the following classes of claims :
BOUNTY and PAY due discharged Soldiers and
Sailors.
BOUNTY (additional) to Soldiers who enlisted
for not less than 2 or 3 years, or were honora
bly discharged for wounds received.
BOUNTY (additional) to Widows, Children, or
Parents of Soldiers who died from wounds re
ceived or disease contracted in said service.
PENSIONS for invalid Soldiers and Sailors, or
to their widows or children.
PENSIONS for fathers and mothers, brothers or
sisters of deceased soldiers, upon whom they
were dependent.
PENSIONS and GRATUITIES for Soldiers or
their Widows from Pennsylvania, in the War
of ISM
PAY due Teamsters, Artificers and Civil em
ployees of the Government.
PAY due for horses lost in the United States
service.
CHARGES.—Tees fair and moderate, and in
no ease will charges be made until the money
is collected. (dee 95.1 yr•
Insurance.
THE OLD PENN MUTUAL
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
OF PHILADELPHIA.
ACCUMULATED CAPITAL, $2,000,000,
Alter paying Losses to the amount of $1,120,000
CHARTER PERPETUAL
All the Surplus Dividend amongst the Policy
Holders every year.
THE ONLY TRULY MUTUAL COMPANY IN
THE CITY OR STATE
For further information apply to
JOHN J. COCHRAN, Agent,
From "Father Abraham" Olfloe,
no2o-tf] Lancaster, Pa
WORLD MUTUAL LIFE INS. CO.
OF
NEW YORK,
NO. 160 BROADWAY
J. F, FRUEAUFF, General Agent for Penn's
NORTH QUEEN STREET,
(Above J. F. Long & Son's Drug Store.)
This Company offers more SOLID and REAL
inducements than any other Life Insurance
Company in the country.
Send or call and get a Circular.
Active solicitors, male or female wanted in
every township in the State. ban 14m.
pennant*
- 1 La SWAMPS*, JlMlllatkliiliaL •
EDITORS EXPRISIS: Dr. Wm. M. Whiteside, the
enterprising Dentist, has purchased from me a
large stock of teeth and all the fixtures, the in
struments formerly belonging to me, and also
those used by my father, Dr. Parry, in his prac
tice. In the purchase, the doctor has provided
th
himself with some of e most valuable and ex
pensive instruments used in dental practice,
and has beyond doubt one of the best and lar
gest oollections of teeth and instruments in the
State. Persons visiting the commodious offices
of Dr. Whiteside, cannot fail to be fully &mom
modated. The Doctor bees no opportunity of
furnishing himself with every late scientific
improvement in his line of business.
B. PARRY.
W . M. WHITESIDE,
DENTIST.
(WIWI AND RESIDENCE,
EAST KING STREET,
Next door to the Court House, over Yahoos-
took's Dry Goode Store,
LA.NOASTItU, rxxxik.
Teeth Extracted without pain by the use of
(Nitrous Oxide) Gas.
noilda]
Banking.
DAVID DAM.
BAIR & SHENK,
BANKERS,
NORTHEAST ANGLE OP CENTEX SQUAD"
. LANCASTER, PENNA.
nole-ly]
MECIEL&NICSI BANK,
NO. in NORTH QULZN STRUT,
(INQUIRER BUILDING,)
Deals in
UNITLD STATICS BONDS, STOCKS, GOLD,
SILVER, sub COUPONS. •
Drafts given an &lithe principal &Gee.
Collections'isaddikrmptly.
Interest paid on Deposits.
Joan M. Srsaxas, SAaUst Sionom,
Josses Ctssuracor.
Bankers as
STRHMAN, CLARKSON k CO.
mhlS•em
A APPEAL FOR ARE TO THE SHICTANT
OF THE OLD BRICK NEETINOUSE.
The following appeal to a sexton for pure
air in the meeting-house should have general
circulation. The spelling is not very good,
but the argument is irresistible. It is from
the Detroit Tribune:
0 sextant of the meetin onee, which sweeps
And dusts, or is supposed to; and makes flea,
And wrings the Bel and toles it when men
dies,to the grief of survivin pardners, and
sweeps pathes ;
And for the nervosa; gits $lOO per annum,
Wish them that thinks deer, let em try it ;
Kindlin fires when the wether is as cold
As zero, and like as not green wood for kind
lers ;
0 Sextant! there are 1 kermoddity
Wich's more than gold,wioh doant cost nothin,
Worth more than anything exsep the Sole of
Mann !
i mean pewer Are, sextant i mean pewer Are !
0 it is plenty out o dores, so plenty it doant no
What on earth to do with itself,
But in church every 1 on us breathes in & out
and out and in,
Bay ISO times a minit, or 1 million and a half
bretha an our.
Now how long will a church ful of are last at
that rate ?
0 Sextant, doant you know our 1
hisses ;
To blow the fler of life, and keep
goin out ; and how can bellussee bl
wind ?
And ain't wind are? i put it to your
Are is the same to us as milk to bay
Or water is to fish, or Pendlums
Or roots and airbs unto an injun
Or little pills unto an omepath,
Or boys to gurls. Are is for us to
Wat signifies who preeches if i cal
And now, o sextant, let me beg 01
2 let a little are into our church.
It ain't much trouble—only make
And the are will cum in of itself ;
And o how it will rouse the people
And sperrit up thepreacher, and
And yawns and figgits as effectooa4
As wind on the dry Boans the Prr
AN UNFORTUNATE WIDO
Col. Small once related the following
odd occurrence during his perigrenations
in Georgia :
" Between Caleba, Swamp and Line
Creek, in the Nation,' we saw a consid
erable crowd gathered near a drinking
house, most of them seated and smoking.
We. ~gee whifrkwas Abe, matter,. It was n ay, and " herehad , been a
quarter race for a gallon of whisky. The
first thing I noticed on alighting was the
singular position of one of the horses of the
party. lie was kneeling down and stand
ing on his hinder feet, his head wedged in
between the ends of two logs of a grocery,
and he was stone dead, having evidently
run directly against the building at full
speed, causing the house to partially
About five paces from the horse lay the
rider, quite senseless, with a gash in his
throat which might have let out a thou
sand lives. As I said, most of the crowd
were seated and smoking.
" What is all this ?" I inquired. "What
is the matter here im
"Matter ?" after awhile answered one
in a drawling voice giving a good spit,
and refilling his mouth with a new cud.
Matter enough ; there's been a quarter
race."
" But how came this man and
killed ?" I asked.
" Well," answered the chewing •
spitting gentleman, " the man was con
siderably in liquor, I reckon, and he ran
his hoes chuck against the house, and
that's the whole on it."
" Has a doctor been sent for ?" inquir
ed one of our party.
"I reckon there ain't much use of doc
tors here," replied another of the crowd.
"Burnt brandy would not save either of
them, man or hose."
"Has this man a wife or children ?"
inquired I.
"No children, that I knows cni," an
swered a female who was sitting on the
ground a short distance from the dead
man, smoking composed.
"He has a wife, the n" I remarked.
"What will be her feelings when she
learns the fatal termination of this most
unfortunate race ?"
I. W. SUN!.
" Yes," sighed the female—it was an
untbrtuate race. " Poor man,
4
the Whbliky."
"Do you happen to know his wife ? has
she been informed of the untimely death
of her husband ?" were my next inquiries.
"Do I know her ? has she been inform
ed of his death ?" said the woman.
" Well, I reckon you ain't acquainted
about these parts. lam the unfortunate
widder."
Can any one tell how men who absolutely
cannot pay small bills, can always Ana
plenty of money to buy liquor and treat
when happening among friends ?
Can any one tell how manyjoung men,
wkp dodge their washerwomeß, and who
arE always behind with their landlord, can
play billiards night and day, and are al
ways ready for a game of Poker or Seven
up 7
Can any one tell how it is that some
men owe their butchers, owe for rent, owe
for tailoring, for shoes, etc., can yet have
everything that's nice, eat oysters at night,
wear fine clothes and have all the delica
cies of the season ?
Can any one tell how men live and sup
port their families who have no income
and don't work, while others who are in
dustrious and always employed almost
starve ?
Can any one tell how a man who is too
poor to pay four or five cents a week for a
newspaper, can spend five or six times as
much for cigars and tobacco, to say noth
ing of drinks ?
'ri4Y ibr
WM
LANCASTER, PA., FRIDAY, JULY 23, 1869.
Pisa Muttons.
BY A. GASPER.
CAN ANT ONE TELL!
COLFAX ON TOE ADMINIIITRATION
The Vice President, Mr. Colfax, made a
long speech in Providence,
a short time
ago, from which we extract the following
just eulogy of President Grant's adminis
tration
Although I shall not transgress the
l a
boun s and speak in regard to any mere
parti n issue of the day, I rejoice with
you hat you have an administration in
pow at Washington (and I allude now
to your President) which is faithful to this
great country. I pass by those petty
bickeeings about the distribution of pa
trQnage, with the single remark that if he
been inspired, he could not have satis
fied ffie one tenth of those who desired to
serve the public in its offices of honor or of
Profit.
That is but a slight ripple upon the
wave ; for when you look at the adminis
tration that is given to you, you find al
ready shining out upon it, in letters of
glittering light, that word that you have
longed to see in the high places at Wash
ington—that word which goes to your
heart—and that is, honesty, which is the
corner stone upon which the policy of the
administration is securely grounded. You
)(now that whether the President has made
this man postmaster or that man collector,
listributed this vast
ly.egiyou, or I, or any
villMeeired to have it
>wli p
t tin that heart
bo there is no
ire cou try.
besides, that you can
portals of the White
ord which you have
net to see, and that is,
service. You know
ire is being cut down,
.istently, in the public
Miry possible way the
'kik are being reduced,
insistently with our
tyment of our public
l governs this coun
e paid, to the utter
you know, besides,
—.iber it shill not be as in recent
years of the past, that the honest taxpay
er shall be compelled to bear his own
INdens and the burden of dishonest par
.
or is this all. Standing as we do
ore; the natiops of the world, emerging
our recent crisis, in which we had to
not only the rebellion with itspeerer,
1 lituiffit , the frown of almost the
world besides—for the morarchial
fkations looked at this republic as a stand
ing snidest against their form of govern
menttand would rejoice to see it crumble
to ruin—you know, to-day, that your
President is speaking for you, and in your
behalfto the other nations of the world,
speak; with no uncertain voice, but with
an emphasis that demands and receives
respect.
JOSH BILLINOS ON REAL ESTATE
Iv.kin sell
for eighteen hundred and
t -nine d ollars , aa panes, a neat and
' ve retirement, located on the virgin
of the Hudson, kontaining 85 acres,
tiii knit is luxuriously dilided by the
. olhature and art into pastures and
~ into plane and declivity, into stern
n '. .me and dalliance uv mosetufted
r. , &earns of sparkling gladness
ifh trout) dance thru this wilder
, t buty to the low moosic uv the
cricket and grasshopper. The evergreen
sighs as the evening zephir flits thru its
shadowy buzzim, and the serpent trem
bles like the love-smitten heart uv a dam
ail Fruits uv the tropiks in golden buty
on the bows, and the bees go hevy and
sweet from the fields to their garnerin
hives. The mansion is uv Parian mar
ble, the porch is a single diamond, set
with rubies and the mother of pearls, the
floors are uv rosewood, and the celina are
more butiful than the starry vault uv
heavin. Hot and cold water bubbles and
squirts in every apartment, and nothin is
malted that a pet culd pray for, or art
wild portray.
The stables are worthy uv the steeds uv
ramrod and the studs of Alkilles, and its
. . was hilt expressly for birds uv
lee, while sombre in the distance,
-r: the cave uv a hermit, glhnees are
'.ht uv the Borg house. Here poets
li,*l : come and warbled their laze, here
eldhlptere have skulpt, here painters robed
the scene uv derry landseapes, and here
the pbilosofer discovered the study which
mlde him the alkemist uv natur. Next
n '
ridhward of this thing of buty sleeps the
residence and domain uv the Duke John
8 th, while southward and near the
spiae-breathing tropics, may be seen the
baronial villy uv the Earl uv Brown and
Duchess Widder Betsy Stevens. Walls
of primitive rock, laid in Roman cement,
bound the estate, while upward and down
ward, the eye ketches, far away the mag-
WI-and slow grandur uv the Hudson.
a T te
As young morn hangs like a curting
uv ver from the blue brest uv the sky,
an I may be seen each night dancin
with golden tiptoes on the green.
N. B.—This angel goes with the place.
Di . , .. ken be seen at the offis uv the
br . :, . Terms flatterin. None but prin
el . dealt with. Titles as pure as the
bread uv a white male infant, and pos
session given with the lark. For more
full dscription, read Ovid's art uv love,
or callin your carriage on
Joau Mamma, Real Estate Agent.
A. FAWKES from Conestoga Valley in
the Southern part of Berko County, states
that, tha wheat crop of that Valley will
avenger from thirty-two to thirty-five bush
els per acre. It is the heaviest yield ever
known jin that valley. Last year the
average per acre was from sixteen to twen
ty Mulles. Corn and oats will follow.
3
~.~
~~
i
him who shall hare borne the battle, and
idosr and his orphan, to do all which may
and cherish a just and a lasting peace
iurselres and with ull ssations."—d. Z.
THE 'VIRGINIA ELECTION-" A GREAT
DEMOCRATIC VICTORY !"
At the recent election in Virginia the
two candidates for Governor were Repub
licans. The Democrats (rebels) made no
nominations, but supported Walker
against Wells. Walker was elected, and
by "nigger" votes at that. During the
canvass he rode in the same carriage with
a "nigger? , orator, and the two addressed
public meetings from the same stand,
and worked together in the same harness
throughout. The Democrats who stip
ported Walker helped elect "niggars' 9 to
the Legislature, and "niggers " and Demo-
crate drank from the same bottle, and af
ter the election celebrated their victory in
the same procession. And Walker made
a speech to this procession of "niggers"
and Democrats, in which he declared him
self in favor of the fifteenth amendment
to the constitution, which does away with
the distinction of color at the ballot box ;
and this sentiment of the Governor elect
was loudly applauded by the fraternal
crew of Democrats and "niggars” present.
Let us sum up. A man is elected Gov
ernor of Virginia by the aid of negro
orators and negro votes. The Democra
tic party of the North are bitterly op
posed to negro voting. The man thus
elected carries with him into the Legisla
ture several negro members he having
urged their election in all his speeches.
This is horribly abhorrent to the princi
pels of the Democratic party North. This
candidate for Governor openly advocated
the fifteenth amendment of the Constitu
tiou,which places the "nigger" on the same
platform with the white man, so far as
political rights are concerned. Ever since
that amendment was proposed the Demo
cratic party of the North, in solid body,
have denounced it as an outrage upon the
white race, and the abomination of ini
quity. And now they claim the triumph
of all these things they abhor, as a "great
Democratic victory Was there ever
such a party since Satan first wagged
his sulphurous tail in the bad place !
Trenton (N. J.,) Sentinel.
A PICTURE.
The New York World has been recently
indulging in low slang in its abuse of Gen.
Daniel E. Sickles , lately appointed Min
ister to Spain, by Gen. Grant. The Tren
ton (N. J.) sentinel, gives the pedigree of
the editor of the World tjiusiy :
- ilow
Yorr Wn in ,
is es a
smooimmw
th, scholastic *M
writer,
but as devoid of principle as a rotton egg.
He prides himself on "fine writing," and
his pen is always open to purchase. In
short, the man is a first-class scoundrel,
and is with King or Commons, according
as he is upon the pay roll. He edited the
World when it was an ultra-radical Re
publican journal, with piety thrown in as
a bait to the religious community. But
the paper did not pay, and was rapidly
running down at the heel. In this crisis
Manton, or Moses, approached George
Opdyke, Republican Mayor of New York
city, and begged for alms. He laid before
that functionary his budget of pecuniary
distress, and informed him that immediate
relief was necessary, or he would be com
pelled to go over to the Democrats,
the
leaders of that party haying offered him
a large sum to renounce his principles and
betray his friends. All these facts were
testified to by Mayor Opdyke during the
progress of a libel suit a few years ago.
"But the Republicans declined the be
witching proposition of the high-toned
Manton, or Moses. Hereupon the pitiful,
villian sought out August Belmont, the
Jew broker, and President of the Demo
cratic National Committee, and drove a
bargain of much greater thrift than that
of his ancestor, Judas Iscariot. His pa
per at once went over to the enemy, and
ever since he has been the most virulent
traducer of the party he deserted that the
Copperhead press could trot out. His lat
est effort was a persistent assault upon
Gen. Sickles, whom he accuses of every
infamy in the calendar of moral delinquen
cy. The dirty sneak of a Copperhead
scribbler has been piling column upon
column of detraction upon the crippled
and gallant soldier, just as he was on the
eve of leaving the country on his mission
to Spain. And this mercenary hound,
who openly sold himself to his political
opponents for so much cash down, and
who this day is open to bids to support
any man or measures, is the leading Dem
ocratic editor in the country 1 What a
base and infamous party 1"
No paper copies the ravings of the pur
chasable creature of the New York World
with more approbation than the Lancas
ter Intelligencer. "Birds of a feather."
CURIOUS STATISTICS
A statistical genius declares that "more
money is expenned in the United States
for cigars than for all the common schools
in the country."
A wag undoubtedly a lover of the weed,
seeing the statement going through the
papers, gets off the following :
"It has been estimated that the cost of
washing linen that might just as well be
worn two days longer amounts to enough
in this country to more than defray the
expenses of the American Board of For
eign Missions.
"The expense of buttons on the backs
of our coats where they are of no earthly
use, is equal to the support of all our or
phan asylums.
"It is estimated that the value of old
boots thrown aside, which might have
been worn at least a day longer is more
than enough to buy flannel nig ht gowns
for every baby in the land. Also, that
the cost of every inch on the frill shirt
collars of our young men is equal to the
sum necessary to put a bible in the hands
of every Patagonian giant."
1 CASH RATES OF ADVERTISING
Ten lines of Nonpareil constitute a Square
EEO
1 week
2 weeks.
3 weeks.
1 month,
2 months.
3 months
6 months
1 year....
Exeentors' Notice q6O
Administrators' Notice 2 50
Assignees' Notice 2 te
Auditors' Notice 1 60
SPECIAL NOTICES—Ten cents a line fbr the
first insertion, and Seven cents a line for each
subsequent insertion.
REAL ESTATE adverthiements, Ten cents a
line for the first insertion and Five oents a lull
for each additional insertion.
WALL KINDS or JOB PRINTING emanated
with neatness and despatch.
N 0.36.
father Abraham's Chip.
PLANT a few kernels of buckwheat in
each hill of cucumbers or melons, and
striped bugs will not trouble them
Six counterfeiters, and their printing
presses, were captured at Snake Hill, N.
J., on Saturday.
IT is currently reported that Mr. Geo.
Peabody will hereafter remain in this
country.
EVERY Republican, in order to secure
his vote, must be registered before the
election—and the better plan is to attend
to it now.
SzYmoun,somewhat short ofsovereigns
Last autumn, has recuperated in recovering
over one million of dollars in a law suit.
Bully for him 1
Am the colored troops fought bravely
—was the opinion of the Copperhea d
hereabouts, on receiving news of the elec
tion in old Virginia never tire !
Ix a recent interview with a reporter,
ex-President Johnson said that he "often
puts his hands to his head and wonders if
he is sane." So do we.
TEE President's proclamation appoints
the 30th of November for the vote in
Mississippi on the constitution recently
framed.
AT nearly all the seaside hotels the mar
riageable ladies invariably wear jockey
hats to breakfast, and frequently to the
dinner table, to hide their crimping pins.
THE latest returns from the vote on Lay
Delegation in the Methodist Episcopal
church develop a more serious opposition
to the movement than has been heretofore
expected.
THE Walla-Walla Statesman speaks of a
town away out in Oregon havin,g elected a
"clean Democratic ticket." Could the
Statesman spare us one of the newly-elect
ed ?—just for a sample.
PRESIDENT GRANT and family visited
Cape May on Saturday and Sunday last,
and went to Long Branch on Sunday
night, where he will remain for a few
days.
REMEMBER that Mr. Packer's wealth
nominated him • it was the reason urg
why he should ben 'wiled •it was his
glWelament of
of tbe.kinnocri. of Penn
kylva New Mk NatiVffsays : "In
Phi r a, for example, they have a
convict and blackleg among their nomi
nees.”
Tir question why printers do not suc
ceed as well as brewers is thus answered :
Because printers work for the herid, and
brewers for the stomach—and where
twenty men have stomachs, but one has
brains.
DOUBLING Gap Springs, the popular
summer resort in Cumberland Co., is open
for the reeption of guests. J. D. Baker,
formerly of the State Capital Hotel, Har
risburg, is manager. Give the Springs a
trial.
GEnurrr SMITH last week gave $2,500
to the Oswego Orphan Asylum. Hs was
visiting the institution, and seeing *kite
and black chidlren treated exactly alike,
expressed his gratification in the above
solid manner.
Tun DEMOCRATIC CRY during the war
—"Down with the military satrap I" The
cry from the same quarter to-day, "Rally,
Rally 1 to the support of an Ohio military
chieftain I" Signor Blitz talks of retiring
from the business of legerdemain.
A little child four years old, near Ko
komo, Ind., suddenly appeared on the rail
road track as a train was passing at a
rapid rate, and was picked up by the cow
catcher, thrown fifteen feet high in the air,
and landed into the ditch without injury.
JOHN WESLEY preferred to preach to
the lower and middling classes rather than
to the wealthy. He used to say that it
was hard to be shallow enough for a "po
lite audience." Few Wesley's nowa
days.
Tau Press says two-thirds of the thirty
five hundred newspapers of the United
States are Republican in politics. Repub.
licans are the reading portion of our
population, and it is they who give life
and vigor to all the educational and intel
lectual undertakings of the day.
Tim Erie Dispatch says : "We sincere
ly trust the Republicans of Pennsylvania
will resolve to break up the 'draw_ipokert
ring which has existed so long in Harris
burg. If they do not manifest a disposi
tion to do so at the coming election, they
deserve to be badly defeated."
THE Harrisburg correspon lent of the
Blair county Radical writes as follows :
"There is a pretty reliable intimation that
Governor Geary, in the event of his re
election, will make a whole new Cabinet
deal. Facts and straws go to confirm this.
Fact No. 1 is that Brewster is going into
a larger Government family ; straw No. 1
is that Adjutant General McCreary is a
candidate for the lower House from Erie ;
straw No. 2 is that several of Secretary
Jordan's clerks are looking out for jobs.
MINISTER BURLINGAME lately rebtdred
the foreigners who thought they "outrank
ed" him in Paris, in the following style :
"We Americans do not raise the question
of rank. We receive all gentlemen as oc
cupying a common level. But if you raise
the question of position, we outrank you.
You are nothing but Dukes, Marquises
and Counts. We belong to tbe royal fam
ily. We are the equal of our President.
We are all heirs apparent to the throne.
We stand up for our order, arid if need be,
we fight for our order."
IN FATHER ABRAHAM.
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