Father Abraham. (Reading, Pa.) 1864-1873, June 04, 1869, Image 1

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    PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY,
RAUCH & COCHRAN,
No. 13, South Queen Street, Lancaster.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
ropy, one year, 4 1.
550
copies, (each name oddreased,) .7.
10 copies " ~ 13.00
15 copies " it 18.00
911 copies " 41 2.00
And 41.10 for each additional anbeeriber.
FOR ctrns, IN rActreess.
5 s
copies, (to one address,)
10 copts " 12.00
15 copies " 46 18.50
90 copies " " 20.00
• And 81.00 for each additional subscriber.
SiirAli subscriptions must invariably be paid
in advance.
JOB PRINTING
Of every description, neatly and promptly exe
cuted, at short notice, and on the most
reasonatdeterme.
' i ilroads.
PENNSYLVANIA CENTRAL R. R.
The time of the arrival and departure of the
trains on the Pennsylvania Railroad, at Lan
caster, has been changed, as follows :
ZABTIVAILD. WILSTWARD.
C incin. ... .120 a. m.' Pittsburg Ex. 1:27 a. in
Phila.Express 4:02 " 'Phila. Exp... 2:39 "
Fast Line 6:35 " Mail 11:15 "
Lane. Train.. 8:58 "Fast Line 2:85 p.m
Day Express. 1:10 p.m. Columbia Ae. 2:15 "
Harrisb , g Ae..5:51 " Marrishtg Ac. 5:54 "
Southern Ex..4:00 " ;Lane. Train.. 7:29 "
Cincin. Ex....10:38
READING RAILROAD
SUMMER ARRANGEMENT,
MONDAY, APRIL 26, 1869
Great Trunk Line f rom the North a ad North
west for Philadelphia . , New York, Raid
ing, Pott.'wille, Tamaqua, Ashland, Sha
mokin Lebanon, Allentown, Easton, Eph
rata, Litiz, Lancaster, Columbia, ctr.
Trains leave Harrisburg for New York as fol
lows: At 2.35, 6,20, 8.10 a. m., 12.26 noon 2.00 and
10.65 p. m., connecting with similar trains on the
Pennsylvania Railroad, and arriving at New
York at 9.45 a. m.,11.45 a. m.,8.50,0.45, 9.80 p.m.,
and 6.00 a. m. respectively. Sleeping Cars ac
company the 2.35,5. N a. in. and 10.65 p.m. trains
without change.
Leave Harrisburg for Reading, Pottsville,
Tamaqua. Minersvlile, Ashland, Shamokin,
Pine Grove. Allentown and Philadelphia, at
8.10 a. m., 2.00 and 4.14, p. in., stopping at Leba
non and principal Way Stations; the 4.10 p. m.
train making connections for Philadelphia,
Pottsville and Columbia only. For Pottsville,
Schuylkill Haven and Auburn, via Schuylkill
and Susquehanna Railroad, leave Harrisburg
at 3.30 p. m.
Returning: Leave New York at 9.00 a. m., 12.00
noon, 6.05 and 8.00 p. in., Philadelphia at 8.115 a.
in. and 3.30 p. m.; sleeping cars accompany the
9.00 a. in., 5.05 and 8.00 p. m. tunics nom New
York, without change.
Way Passenger Train leaves Philadelphia at
7.30 a. tn., connecting with similar train on East
Penna. Railroad, returning from Reading at
6.30 p. in., stopping at all stations; leave Potts
vine at 7.30, 8 45 a. in., and 2 45 p. m.; Shamokin
at 5.26 and 10.36a.m.; Ashland at 7.00 a.m., and 12.30
noon, Tamaqua at 8.30 a. tn.; and 2.20 p. in., for
Philadelphia and New York.
Leave Pottsville, via Schuvlkill and Susque
hanna Railroad at 7.01 a. tn. for Harrisburg, and
11.30 a. m. for Pine V rove and Tremont.
Reading Accommodation Train : Leaves
Reading at 7:30 a. m., returning leaves Phila
delphia at 5:15 p.
Pottstown accommodation Train: Leaves
Pottstown at 6.25 a. in.; returning, leaves Phila
delphia at 4.30 p.
Columbia Railroad Trains leave Reading at
7.041 a. m. and 8.15 p. in. for Ephrata, Litiz,3.llol
- Columbia, &c.
Perkiomen Railroad Trains leave Perkiomen
.Tnnction at 3.00 a and 6.00 p. in ; returning,
leave skippack at 8.15 a. in. and 1.00 p m., con
necting with similar trains on Reading Rail
load.
( on Sundays: Leave New York at 8.00 p. tn.,
Philadelphia at 8.00 a. m. and 3.15 p. in., the
8.00 a. m. train running only to Reading; Potts
ville 8.00 a. m.; Harrisburg 5.20 a. m., 4.10 and
10.55 p. m., and Readingat 12.55, midnight, 2.54
and 7.15 a. m. For Harrisburg,at 12.55 midnight
and 7.05. a. m. for New York; and at 9.40 m. and
4.25 p. m. far Philadelphia.
Commutation, Mileage, Season, School and
Excursion Tickets, to and from all points, at
educed rates.
Baggage checked through; 100 pounds allowed
each russenger.
G. A. Nit OLLS,
General Superintendent.
Itita DIN°, Pa., April 26,11368. [april 30-ltd & w
READING AND COLUMBIA It. R.
ON AND AFTER
THURSDAY, APRIL 15th, 1500,
PASSENGER TRAINS WILL BE RUN ON THIS
ROAD, AS FOLLOWS:
LISAVIL ARRIVIL
Lancaster EPOS a. m. Reading .....10:90 a, m
,4 3.10 p. mi. " 6:80 p.
Columbia 8.00 a. " 10:20 a. m
3.00 p.m. 5:30 p.
RETIJRNING:
LEAVE. aitaivr.
Reading 7:00 a. m. Laneaster.....9:ls a. m
" ..... 6:15 p. m. It
.....8:25 p.m
•' 7:00 a. m. Columbia .....9:25 a. in
~
..... 0:15 p. in. 1.1
.....6:30 p. m
Trains leaving Lancaster and Columbia as
above, make close connection at Reading with
Trains North and South; on Philadelphia and
Reading Railroad, and West on Lebanon Valley
Road. Train leaving Lancasterat 806 A. M. and
Columbia at 8 A. 111. connects closely at Reading
with Train for New York,
Tickets can be obtained at the Offices of the
New Jersey Central Railroad, foot of Liberty
street, New Yolk; and Philadelphia and Readin g
Railroad, 18th and Callowhill streets, Phila.
Through tickets to New York and Pliliadel
phia slid at all the Principal Stations,and Bag
gage Checked Through.
.IWi[lleage Ticket Books for 800 or 1000 miles,
Season and Excundon Tickets, to and from all
points, at reduced rates.
Trains are run by Philadelphia and Reading
Railroad Time, which is 10 minutes faster than
Pennsylvania Railroad Time.
apl 16-4110.tf] ORO. F. GAGE. S
NORTHERN CENTRAL RA_
WAY.
Trains leave York for Wrightsville an
lumbia, at 6;20 and 11:40 a. m., and 3:30 p. m
Leave Wrightsville for York, at &to a. ru
1:00 and 8:50 p. m.
Leave Yolk for Baltimore, at 5:00 and 1 '
in., 1:05 p. in.; and 19 midnight.
Leave York for Harrisburg, at 1:39, 6:25 an
a. m., and 20 and 19:15 p.
TRAINS LEAVE HARRISBURG.
GOING NORTH.
At 3:25 a. IN., and I:2A and 4:20 p. m.
GOING SOUTH.
At 8:45 and 6:25 a. in., and 12:30 and 10:45 p
deell-tfd
Photographs, &c.
GOLDEN GIFTS.
Parents to Families,
Father to Daughter,
Mother to Son
GENTLEMEN TO LADIES
When the light has left the house, memorla
such as these compound their interest.
GILL'S SUPERB PHOTO.
Miniature or Opal Pictures, admitted to be
the best in't„he city, and no superior in the State
Constantly' increa sing demand and great expe
rience in this stve of miniature give us greater
facilities and better results than any establish
ment outside of large cities.
STEREOGRAPHS OE HOME VIEWS for the
Centre Table. Also, prismatic instruments.
Large Colored Work by some of the best Ar
tists in Philadelphia and elsewhere in the high,
est style of th e art. India Ink, Pastille, Crayon
and colors, at
GILL'S CITY GALLERY,
No. 80 East Rlng-st
.Pin 1-Iyr]
Hotels.
U . S. HOTEL,
OPPOSITE PENNA. B. U. DEPOT,
lIARRISBUR 0 3 PA
W. H. EMMINGER & CO.,
sahl2-41 Proprietors
to see the right, kt of stripe on to ;Int
we are in; to bind up • the nations
VoL 11.
Claim Agency.
JAMES BLACK,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
AND
MILITARY AND NAVAL CLAIM AGENT,
No. 66 East King-st., Lancaster, Pa.
Being duly licensed as a Claim Agent, and
having a large experience, prompt attention
will be given to the following classes Of claims :
BOUNTY and PAY due discharged Soldiers and
Sailors.
BOUNTY (additional) to Soldiers who enlisted
for not less than 2 or 3 years, or were honora
bly discharged for wounds received.
BOUNTY (additional) to Widows, Children, or
Parents of Soldiers who died from wounds re
ceived or disease contracted in said service.
PENSIONS fnr invalid Soldiers and Sailors, or
to their widows or children.
PENSIONS for fathers and mothers, brothers or
sisters of deceased soldiers, upon whom they
were dependent.
PENSIONS and GRATUITIES for Soldiers or
their Widows from Pennsylvania, in the War
of 1812.
PAY due Teamsters, Artificers and Civil em
ployees of the Government.
PAY due for horses lost in the United States
service.
CHARGES.—Fees fair and moderate, and in
no case will charges be made until the money
is collected. [dee 25-Iyr*
Insurance.
THE OLD PENN MUTUAL
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
OF PHILADELPHIA.
ACCUMULATED CAPITAL, $2,000,000,
After paying Losses to the amount of $1,120,000
CHARTER PERPETUAL.
All the Surplus Dividend amongst the Policy
Holders every year.
THE ONLY TRULY MUTUAL COMPANY IN
THE CITY OR STATF
For further laformation apply to
JOHN J. COCHRAN, Agent,
From "Father Abraham" Office,
n02.0-tf] .14u:waster, Pa.
WORLD MUTUAL LIFE INS. CO
OF
NEW YORK,
NO. 160 BROADWAY
J. F. FRUEAUFF, General Agent for Penn , a.
NORTH QUEEN STIIEET,
(Above J. F. Long & Son's Drug Store.)
This Company pliers more SOLID and RE.bil,
inducements than any other Life Insurance
Company in the country.
Sind or call and get a Circular.
Active solicitors, male or female, wanted in
every township in the State. [jan 1-6 m•
Hats, Caps, Pars, &c.
1868. 1868.
•_ :113 . LTZ & BROTHER,
I A 'll' E R s ,
' NOHTII QUI3EN
_ ANCASTKR, PENNA.
and Winter EATS
:.11 qualities ar.d
_A DIES' FANCY FURS
We are now opening the largest and most
complete assortment of Ladies , and Children's
FANCY FURS ever offered in this market., at
very low prices.
ROBES! ROBES!! ROBES!!!
Buffalo Robes, lined and unlined; Hudson Bay
• Wolf, Prairie Wolf, Fox, Loon s ite.
BLANKETS AND LAP RUGS
Of all qualities, to which we would particularly
invite the attention of all persons in want of
articles in that line.
GLOVES, GAUNTLETS and MITTS.
OTTER
BEAVER,
NUTRIA
SEAL
BUCKSKIN
FLESH
, &c., &e
Ladies , Fine Fur Trimmed OW, , Gauntlets
Mitts and Hoed
PULSE WARMERS and EAR MITTS.
WOOLEBALE AND RETAIL
no9:l4f]
.Banking.
I=!
BAIR & SHENK,
BANKERS,
NORTHEAST ANGLE OF CENTRE SQUARE,
LANCASTER, PENNA.
no2o-131
MECIIA—NICS , BANK,
NO. WI NORTH QUEEN STREET,
(INQUIRER BUILDING,)
• Deals In
UNITED STATES FONDS, STOCKS, GOLD,
SILVER, AND COUPONS
Drafts given on all the principal Cities
Collections made promptly.
Interest paid on Deposits
JOHN M. STEHMAN, SAMUEL SLOKOIII,
JOSEPH CLARKSON.
Rankers as
STEHMAN, CLARKSON & CO
inh26-an
Periodicals.
THE DAILY EVENING EXPRESS,
FURNISHES ITS READERS REGULARLY
WITS
THE LATEST NEWS BY MAIL
AND
MAGNETIC TELEGRAPH,
And all Important Local and General In
telligence.
Titans: $5.00 A YEAR; $1.25 FOE 8 MONTHS.
THE WEEKLY EXPRESS,
A SATURDAY PAPER OF THE FIRST CLASS,
Contains all the news of the week up to Friday
night, and gives more fresh reading than can be
had elsewhere for the same amount of money.
Tues: $2.00 PER YEAR, IN ADVANCE.
Address
PEARSOL d GRIST Publishers
dec 18.6m] L ancaster, Pa.
THE WORN WEDDING-RIFE.
Your wedding-ring wears thin, dear wife; ah,
summers not a few,
Since I put it on your finger first, have pass'd
o'er me and you ;
And, love, what changes we have seen—what
cares and pleasures too—
Since you became my own dear wife, when
this old ring was ifew.
0 blessings on that happy day, the happiest
of my life,
When, ti a tics God! your low sweet "Yes,"
matte you my loving wife ;
Your heart will say the same, I know, that
day's as dear to you,
That day that made me yours, dear wife, when
this old ring was new.
How well do I remember now, your young
sweet face that day;
How fair you were—how dear you were—my
tongue could hardly say!
Nor bow I doted on you ; ab, bow proud I was
of you;
But did I love you more than now, when this
old ring was new?
No, no! no fairer were you then than at this
hour to me;
And dear as life to me this day, bow could
you dearer be?
As sweet your face might be that day as row
• it is, 'tie true,
But did I know your heart as well when this
old ring was new?
0 partner of my gladness, wife, what care,
what grief is there,
For me you would not bravely face—with me
you would not share'?
0 what a weary want had every day, if want
ing you,
Wanting the love that God made mine, when
this old ring was new.
Years bring fresh links to bind us, wife—small
voices that are.here,
Small faces round our fire that make their
mother's yet more dear.
Small, loving hearts your care each day makes
vet more like to you,
More like the loving heart made mine when
this old ring was new.
And, blessed be God, all he has given are with
us yet, around
Our table, every little life lent to us still is
found;
Though oare's we've known, with hopeful
hearts :Le worst we've struggled
through;
Bless'd be his name for all his love since this
40:.1 ring was new.
The past is dear; its sweetness still our mem
ories treasure yet;
The griefs we've borne, together borne, lore
would not now forget;
Whatever. wile,..tha.Zuture briags r beastsuee
heart still true,
We'll share as we have shared all else since
this old ring was new.
And if God spare us 'mongst our 1301:18 and
daughters to grow old,
We know his goodness will net let your heart
or mine grow cold;
Your aged eyes shall see in mine all they've
still shown to you,
And mine in yours all they have seen since
this old ring was new.
And 01 when death shall come at last to bid
me to my rest.
May I die looking in those eyes, and resting
on that breast;
0 may my parting gaze be bless'd with the
dear sight of you!
Of those fond eyes—fond as they were when
this old ring was new, 01'
"It's very strange," mused Blanche Pen
roy, slowly weaving together the wreath
of scarlet autumn leaves, with which she
was decorating her hroad-brimmediitmw
hat. " I know so little about him', I have
only known him ten days, and yet; when
he spoke of leaving Elm Point, last night,
it seemed as if all the sunshine had gone
out of the world. Oh, Blanche, you
naughty little Blanche!" shelidded, lean
ing forward, and apostrophizing the fair
face mirrored in the glen-stream at her
feet. Is it possible that you have allow
ed yourself to tall in love with th,lit tall,
dark-eyed fellow?"
The roses mounted up in her cheeks as
she wondered within herself whether Gil
bert Evcring eared for her.
" I wish I knew," she 'uttered aloud.
"Knew what?" demanded a halm
voice, and Mr. Evering seated hbuself on
the log beside her—a straight, handsome
man, with brilliant black eyes, regular
features, and a deep color glowing through
his olive skin.
I=l
Blanche demurely looked up at, him.
She was not to be taken by 'storm thus
easily.
" I wish I knew whether it will rain to
morrow, for I want to wear my white In
dia muslin at our picnic."
"Oh, the picnic! I had Negates that
when I spoke of leaving to-sorrow. Of
course, though, my presence .or absence
would make no very great diterence."
Somehow that scarlet and brown spot
ted maple leaf required a great deal or ad
justing just then. '
"Blanche, shall I go or stay?"
"Just as you please."
" No. Just as somebody else pleases.
Yes or no? And I forewarn you that yes
means a great deal."
"How much does it nieau, now?" ques
tioned Blanche, half archly, half timor
ously.
" E very th ing.
"Then you may stay."
" My Blanche, nay little white daisy!"
he whispered, bending his stately head
over the slender hand that lay on the au
tumn leaves. And Blanche felt that in
the golden stillness of that October dell she
had turned oves a new page in her life.
She was very happy, and all that day
she seemed to be groping through the mys
teries of a dream. But with the morning
came other feelings. Alas! that shadow
ram
SionWow.
ADOPTED.
should always follow sunshine in this
world of our
“ I am not disposed to be unreasonable,
Blanche,” said Gilbert, in a whisper, as
he arranged her white lace shawl for her
amid the merry tumult of the picnic
ground, "but I think you have waltzed
quite often enough with that puppy Bir
mingham."
"Jealous already, Gilbert?" taunted
the girl, flushed and rosy with the tri
umphs of her beauty and the irresistible
instincts of coquetry. She colored crim
son.
"Of course you will do as you please;
only I warn you, Blanche, it is a choice
between Birmingham and me. You dance
with him at your own risk."
At that instant Walter Birmingham
came up, and respectfully asked, "If lie
could have the pleasure of a polka with
Miss Penroy?
And Blanche, defiant and willful, and a
little piqued, answered:
" es."
And she glided away with her plump
hand on Birmingham's shoulder. (filbert
had no right'to be so unreasonable.
His grave, stern face rather startled her
as she came back to the rustic seat of
twisted boughs, when the dance was fin
ished and Birmingham had gout , td bring
her an iced lemonade.
"Gilbert, why do you look so cross?"
"Because I have a reason. lam sorry
that you pay so little attention to my
wishes, Miss Penroy."
She drew herself up haughtily.
"You are beginning to dictate rather
too early, sir."
"Have 1 not the right' "
"Nothing of the sort, Mr. Evering."
"Be it so, Blanche," he said, in a voice
that betrayed how deep the arrow rankled
in his bosom; "I give up the right, now
and forever.' ,
Blanche was startled. She would have
said more, but Birmingham was advanc
ing toward her, and when she next had
leisure to look around her, Gilbert was
gone from her side.
" What have I done?" she thought in
dismay. " see him this evening, and
coax him into a good humor once more.
He surely can't be vexed at me for an
idle word like that."
Ah, little Blanche, it is not the well
considered sentence that does all the harem
in the world; it is the idle word.
"Such a charming day as we have had,
Mrs. Train," said Blanche, as she came
up the steps of the - plazza, as sinning and
radiant as if the worm of remorse were
not gnawing at her heart.
" That, of course," said the blooming
matron, who was reading in an easy chair,
under the shadow of the vines. " But
who sent Mr. Evering away in such a
hurry?"
" Sent him away?"
" Yes, by the evening train. lle Caine
home, packed up his things, and drove
away as if there was not a moment to lose.
lam very sorry. We shall miss him so
much."
Blanche went slowly up stairs and sat
down by her window, looking at the pur
ple glow of the evening landscape as if it
were a featureless blank. So he had gone
away, and by her own folly she had lost
the priceless treasure of Gilbert Evering's
love.
" I cannot write to him, for I do not
"glow his address," she said, with cla , ped
hltnds. "Well, it is my own limit, and I
mist abide the consequences as best I
ma j. 4?
Blanche Penroy went from the gay sum
mer 161Kging place a sadder and wiser
woman; uttl the November mists drop
ping over the brick and mortar wilderness
of her New York home, had never seemed
half so dreary to her before as they seemed
now.
"1 shall be an old maid,' thought
Blanche, as she walked up and down in
the tirellAt dailipess of her quiet drawing
renal, •vrfth het dimpled hands clasped be
hind her Waist:
" I never cared for any one as I cared
for Gilbert;, and I dare say I shall keep a
eat, and grew fond of green tea, and scan
dal, and the sewing circles. Ah! well a
dal. NA Mud of life cannot last forever."
Sh,e,rang the bell with a very impatient
jerk:
"Are there any letters, Sanderson? "
"One, ma'am; it came by the evening
post, only a few minutes since."
Blanche sat down by the fire, opened
the letter, and commenced to read.
" Black-edged and black-sealed. So poor
Mrs. Marchnont is gone at last."
It was from the executors of Miss Pon
.roy's distant cousin, formally and briefly
, announcing her death, which had taken
place, in one of the West India islands,
some months since, but the melancholy
newel of which,. so the :otter ran, had been
otikf fleet received. It was not entirely
unexpected, as Mrs. Marchmont had, for
ovma years, ,teen slowly falling out of the
'world, a victim of hereditary consumption.
"Leaying one child, a son," slowly re
peated Blanche, leaning her cheek on her
hand and looking down into the quiver of
the white, hot coals.• "Poor little fellow,
he feels nearly as disconsolate and alone
as I do; only I have one advantage.
"I have a sufficiency of this world's
goods, and this orphaned child must not be
thi own penniless and alone on his own re
sources, for, if I remember aright, Mrs.
Marchmont forfeited all the wealth of her
tint marriage by her second alliance wit`s
that poverty,-stricken lawyer, whose death
plunged her into such bitter mourning.
That was a genuine love match, yet how
much trouble and grief it brought with it,
leaving one child, a son! Why should I
not adopt the waif, and make it a business
of life to cherish and comfort him? I have
no object in existence; there is one that
im who shall hare borne the battle, and
dose and his orphan, to do all which may
it cherish a just and a lasting' peace
retires and with all nations."—ol. Z.
DI
Providence seems to have pointed out to
me."
Once more she rang the bell, with a fresh
color glowing in her cheeks, and a new
light in her eyes.
" Bring me my writing desk immedi
ately, Sanderson, and get ready to take a
letter to the post-office."
The old servant obeyed, wondering at
his mistress' unwonted energy, and yet
well Weased to see some of her old anima
tion returning.
It was a very simple and unconscious
letter that Blanche Ponroy wrote to her
"far away , cousin's executor from the
fullness of her heart.
" I shall never marry now," she wrote,
"and it seems to be my plainly indicated
duty to undertake the care of the orphan
child of my cousin, Mrs. Marchmont.
With your approval, therefore, I mean to
adopt him, and endeavor, as far as in my
power, to supply the place of his lost
mother. You may at first deem me too
young to undertake so grave and serious
a responsibility; but I was nineteen last
month, and am very, very much older
in feeling and thought than in years. Of
course, at my death, the child will inherit
the property which was left by my dear
deceased parents."
"I hope my cousin's executors are like
the nice white-headed old lawyers one
reads about in novels," said Blanche to
herself, as she folded the little perfumed
sheet of pink paper, "and not cross 01l
foeies, talking of expediency and appro
priateness, for I do so much want some
body to love and care for; somehow,. I've
a sort of premonition that this little fellow
will be nice, rosy and loveable. I think
I'll teach him to call me aunty."
Just a week subsequently, a prim legal
note was received from Messrs. Alias &
Corp is, the deceased lady's executors,
statang that they saw no " valid objection
to Miss Ponroy's very laudable object,
and that, in accordance thereto, the child
of the late Mrs. Marchmont would arrive
at Miss Ponroy's residence on the follow
ing Saturday."
"Saturday—and this is Friday;' said
Blanche, with a new brightness dancing
in the hazel eye. Oh, how glad I shall
be! Sanderson, tell Mrs. Brown to have
the blue room fitted up immediately for
Master Marchmont,and you had better go
yourself to the depot with the carriage at
o o'clock to-morrow afternoon."
Yes, ma'am," replied Sanderson,
somewhat stolidly. The apparition of a
green, unruly boy, trampling with muddy
boots on the velvet carpets, and haunting
the house with ball and marbles, and lung
splitting ballots, did not possess theeharm
to sanuersou's eyes that it seeme t to his
'Macre. s'. And even the patient Mrs.
Brown remarked, with a species of exas
peration, that—
•• She didn't see what put that freak
into Miss 'Blanche's head."
Saturday was a day of hail and tempest,
and by .5 o'clock the drawing rooms were
lighted, and the crimson silk curtains
closely drawn to exclude the stormy dark
ness without. Six times within the last
fifteen *minutes had Blanche looked at her
watch, as she stood by the fire waiting to
hear the approach of the carriage. She
was dressed in a rich blue China silk dress,
with pearl pin and ear drops, and a little
point lace at h r throat, and the clear rosy
tint on her cheek. She was, unconscious
ly, very beautiful.
• 'Here's the little gentleman, Miss, said
Sanderson, with a half-suppressed sound
between a laugh and a snort.
But instead of a child seven or eight
years old, a tall, handsome young gentle
man, something over six feet, with a
black moustache, and merry hazel eyes,
brimming over with mirth. For an in
stant Blanche stared at him, as if she
could hardly credit the evidence of her
own senses.
" Gilbert!"
"Exactly! Ycu wanted to adopt rue,
and here I am!"
No, but Gilbert—"
" Yes, but Blanche!"
"You are not Mrs. Marchniont's son!"
" I am—by her first marriage. Al
though I am by no means the penniless
infant you seemed to suppose, as all my
father's wealth comes to me. lam quite
willing to be adopted—particularly as you
are not married to Mr. Birmingham."
Blanche struggled between tears and
laughter, uncerta:n which would best ex
press her feelings, but Gilbert Evering
drew her tenderly toward him.
" If you adopt hie, dearest, it must be
for life. Nay, do not hesitate. Our hap
piness has already been too much at the
mercy of trifles. You will not retract
your offer?"
" Well, after all," said Blanche, rather
demurely, "you will be a good little boy,
and mind all your Aunty tells you. All
I wanted was some one to 1 we and care
for—"
"And I shall do very well in that
capacity, eh?,"
Sanderson, who had been listening dili
gently at the door, crept down stairs to in
form Mrs. Brown that. they were going to
have a new master.
A certain amount ofopposition is a great
help to a man. Kites rise against the
wind, and with the wind; even a head
wind is better than none. No man ever
worked his passage anywhere in a dead
calm. Let no man wax pale, therefore,
because of opposition; opposition is what
he wants and must have, to be good for
anything. Hardship is the native soil of
manhood and self-reliance. He that can
not abide the storm without flinching, lies
down by the wayside, to be overlooked or
forgotten.
MEM
OPPOSITION.
CASH RATES OF ADVERTISING
IN FATHER ABRARAL
Ten I - Incept ;leeward] econ4t4tuteja ware.
_ _ t
ME!
1 week .
weo4 b .
3 w .
1 moll •
2 naoerlui.
8 reositke.
ti mouths.
1 year...
Exeept t ore , Notice
AdniMlittetorat
Assirkees , 18914 e...
rwm,
Ale— E algid
aRSGLA.L.IIO , AIOIid--Tee hentehiteeder the
first inenrylon. mold Seven cents a line for each
haseirehat briertton.
REAL ESTATE advertisentante, Tee *seta
line for the first ins ertiona leiVe cents a line
derma& laeleemedr
~GALL KINDS or JOB PRINTING isionsted
alitti aesthete end despatok. •
NO. 29.
The following touching story is takes
from the Boston Traveller: At one end or
a row of graves in the Newbern (N. C.)
Cemetery are two graves, of which un
common care has been taken, and to which
our attention was . called by the keeper.
They bear the following touching inscrip
tions:
(The name is not given on the board,
but we learned that it was a merhber of
Company E. of this regiment.)
The other road as follows:
" Miss Carrie E. Cutter,
"Betrothed to No. 1744.
"Burled at hie aide at her own request."
Probably many in the old twenty-first
will know the circumstances and tell the
story of these two lovers; but the inscrip
tion on their head-boars is all we know
of their life of love or devotion at death.
But other incidents we do know that are
full of interest to us, and we doubt not to
your readers, which are recalled as we
stand by the flagstaff and read over the
familiar names on the white board before.
us: "Follijambo, Tenth Connecticut."
All, yes! that is the very grave they told
us about, and this is the sad story of love
they told us.
" The soldier lying in that grave was
reared by kind parents, in Hartford, and
at the age of 20—an honest, intelligent
young man—he went to New Haven_
rhere he became acquainted with a young,
lady . by the name of Fenin, who came to
visit her brother, then in college. Thee
became engaged to be married, and all was
sunshine in the path of life. But the re
bellion came, and she returnedto her home
in Harlem, to wait for his return from the
war, to which he was determined to go.
Two years of correspondence and two fur
loughs cemented their affections,
.untiT
they felt that no earthly obstacle could
come between them and the sweet joy's of
life in store for them.
But to the loving heart in Harlem
there one day came a report that her be- ,
trothed was. killed. In wild suspense she
waited for his letLrs, but none came.
lice flatlet wrote to the Colonel and to the
Chaplain. could only say that he
was 'inissing. , With no thought (dummy,
or trouble, or eve, the old gray-headed
father, wlrbse daughter, since the death of
his son, was his all, searched unceasingly
for some clue to the missing one;. even ven
tured into the lines of the enemy, She,
with that sublime fortitude which•only a
woman catecommand when trouble cornea,
and with that devotion which makes a wo
man's love so pure and sacred, shared the
dangers and fatigues of a two years'
search, knowing nothing, caring for no
thing, unless it concerned her lover.
Finally his grave was found in the woods
near where the Tenth once formed a skir
mish line, and a little head-board beating
his name carved in crooked lines• with a
pen-knife, marked hidresting place.
" Word. was sent to the mourners, and
the next conveyance brought them to the
spot. For a while the daughter sat in the
carriage; and would not getout, not daring
to trust herself within view of the spot
where lay the dearest form she ever knew.
'Come Nelly,' said the old men, and with
a forced calmness he assisted bin daughter
from the carriage. Going to"the grave,
she walked around it, read slowly the in
scription, and then folding her arms across
, her breast, she exclaimed ' Oh, Charley!'
and fell upon the grave a corpse. The
old man, alone in this world of grief, was
led away by the driver a maniac. To
day, at the asylum in New York, he is
constantly inquiring in his delirium, why
his daughter is not married."
HAPPY BOY: "I say, boy, why dorm
whistle so gaily?"
"Cause I'm happy, mister."
" What makes you so happy?"
"Cause I got a new shirt; look-a-here;
ain't it nice?"
"It don't look very new, whs is it
made of ?"
" Why 'tis new, 'cause mam made it
yesterday out of dad's old 'un!" '
" And what was `dad's old 'un' made
of?"
" Why, one of granny's old sheets, what.
her mam gave her."
ABOUT llonszs: Horses as a general
thing get too much licking and too little
feed. If a man loses his hat while driv
ing his horse, he licks his horse to pay for
it. If he runs into another wagon through
his own carelessness, he licks his horse to
make it all right. If his horse slips or
stumbles, he gets licked for it—if he does
anything, he gets licked for it—if he don't
do anything he gets the same. A..great
many horses know " a sight " more than
their drivers, and if they could change
places with them, society at large would
be :miners and so would horses.
TRE comments of a colored preacher on
the text " It is more blessed to give than
to receive," are inimitable for point as
well as eloquence. "I've known mug a
church to die 'cause it didn't give enough;
but I never knowed a church to die 'cause
it gave too much. Dey don't die dat way.
Brederin, has any of you knowed a church
to die 'cause it gave too much? If you
do, just let me know; and I'll make a pil
grimage to dat church, and I'll climb by
de soft light of de moon to its nioss-cover
ed root and I'll stand dar and Many
hands to heaven and say, 'Blessed are de
dead dat die in de Lord.'"
TUE richest bridal dress ever seen' in
New York was worn by a Cuban heiress
worth 820,000,000.
$ 1 40 $ 2 1
.
Ir .
,e 0 $ VIVO] is ii
1 00 ZI 00
o
s 00 1 30 00 1
11 Fi t
00. 20 00. 40 1 00 0 CO 4O 00001
$
1
406,
7 00
12 00
Two GRAM.
" No. 1744.
"Twenty-first Massachusetts
Betrothed to C. E. C."
CI
nteE
rcEn
1111
1400
171*
:
MI OD
7100
120 00
.tea
• 2 al
.sr