Clearfield Republican. (Clearfield, Pa.) 1851-1937, July 13, 1881, Image 1

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    TEE
- CLEARFIELD REPUBLICAN,"
aUBUBaaB BrBBV WBDBBSB4V, At
CLKARFIILD, FA.
EDUCATIONAL. ,
by m. l. Moquown.
A now school house will be built at
Oak Grove in Gullcb township, thi
Summer.
Tho Now Washington Normal school,
we understand, will be conlinuod four
woeka after the present session ex
pire. The teachers' examination for Qulich
township will be held at Itamey tbis
year, and for Beccaria township at
Utahvillo.
Mia Kitta Logan has been employed
to. teach the Marron school, in Fer
guson township, for a Summer term ol
two month.
REPTJ
IGAN.
:if ABLIIIIED IK lt1.
I Ik larg-eit Clrealatlaa af any Nawapaper
In North Central Pcnneylraula.
CLEARFIELD
Terms of Subscription,
If paid la adraaoa, 01 within t month (Ml
ir paid after I and before moBlhe....... go
f paid after the axplratloa of moathe.. S UO
Bates ot Advertising,
Traniieat edrertleemeatj, per aqnareef llllneior
laM, I time! er leu . $ a
for each eabeequent ineertioa a
i.linlniatratori' and Eteeatore'nottcea-. I IB
Auditor!' aolleea I II
Cautiona and Kitraye 1 eB
piiiolution notleea S B0
Profeulonal Carda, I Hnaa or loaafl year.... I BO
L-el notleea, par Una .. IQ
YEARLY ADVKRTISKMENTS.
I inoere ft. OB I eolnma...., M BB
niuerea.. It BB I I eolumn........ TB BB
I iquares.. SB IB I eolama....,....13S
9. B. OOODLANDER
Publisher
jj w. smith,
attorney-'at-law,
tlilil. Clearfield, Pa.
J J. LINGLE,
ATTORNEY-AT - LAW,
1:11 Pbllipebur;, Centra Ce Pa. r:pd
JOLAND D.SWOOPE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Curwrnirille, Clearfield eoantj. Pa.
oat ,'!- If.
QSCAR MITCHELL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
umia in "(JIB Wetternl building, (up-etetr).
dot . '781';
JSRAEIi TEST,
ATTORNKY AT LAW,
Clearfield, Pa.
j?gr Office ooa door aalt of Bhaw Heaae.
IJTjlM
-y M. SI. McCULLOUGIT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
Oftl.-e In lleionio building, Seoond atreet, op-
prima mo voun tiouee. jezo, 7B-M.
C. ARNOLD,
LAW A COLLECTION OFFICE,
CURWINSVILLR,
Clearfield Conner, Penn'e. Joy
C T. BROCKBANK,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
(Jf5o In Opera Houaa. ap lo,'T7-ly
M a. A. Wam.acb Davin L. Knaa,-
llinitr F. Wai.hi a War. E. WaiLaca.
yALLACK & KREBS,
ATT0RNEY8-AT-LAW,
jnl'M Clearfield, Pa.
gMlTII V. WILSON,
.1ltornty-nt-l.au,
CLEARFIELD, - PKNN'A.
Mfr-Offlre Ib tbe Maeonie Building, over tba
luunty national liana. luierZo-Su.
J F. SNYDER, "
attorney' at law,
clearfield, pa.
Olfine erar the County Natloaal Bank.
Jnna W, "TStf.
jRANK O. HARRIS,
attorney at law,
Clbabfiilb, Pann'a.
Kirit-eleii Lira and Fira Ioaaranoa Compaolrl
r..T.ent-d.
MTOrneo la Iba Opera Duaia.-Sa
Mar. Id,'ll-ly
run. a. nvasar..
orana aoaooa.
jURRAY 4 GORDON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
Jefir-Offivo la Pla'i Opera llooia, leoond floor.
:J0'74
yiLLlAM A. EA&ERTY,
.t TTOMUre:iT-I.A ',
oi'I'll'K orer T. A. fleck at Co.'a (tore,
OLKARFIELD, PENN'A
Mr-Will attend to all legal builneie wltb
promptneaa and adellty. p:ebll, lo.tr.
iuara t. b'biullt dabibl w. a'cuanr.
McE:
cENALLY & McCURDY
ATTORN KYS-AT-LAW,
Cietrfleid. -
L((f.I business ettended U pronptly wlthj
LMtlitj. Office oa tieoood trees, ftboTe Ike First
Ml ion U iletik. JD.1;7
T P. .McHRNRICR,
" a
DISTRICT ATTORNEY,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
All laaal buiiBeu rotralted to bll ear ttill ra
ftelve prunpt attentian.
NrOfflce la the Coart Houio.
au14,la7l-lF.
t G. KliAMER,
A.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Real Eatata aod Colleotloo Agent,
t I.F.AHFIKLII, PA.,
Will prompt! attend to ail legal butlneaa ea
1,0,10(1 to hie eare.
-OBoe la Ple'l Opera Iloate. Jaal'7l.
JOHN L. CUTTLE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Ind Real Ratate Afrent, Clearflrld, Pa,
Offloa ea Third itreet, bet.Oherry A Walnat.
JB)BTMHeipaetfull7 offera bla eervleea in lolling
aad baring land! in Claarflald and adjoining
eeonttea and wltb aa oiporlenoeot orerlwentr
yaara aa a earrevor, flattera blmielf that ha eaa
reader aatlilaotloa. laea. ie:na:n,
I'ltpiclnia' Cards.
JJR K M. SCHEURER,
IIOWKOPATHIO PHT8IC1AN,
Oflloa la reaideaoa on Flrit ai.
April 14, 1871. Cleerllcld, Pa.
jyt. W. A. MEANS,
PHYSICIAN SURGEON,
DUBOIS CUT, PA.
Will attend profaiiloaal aalla promptl;. angll'7l
jyi. T. J. DOTER,
fllYsfciAN AND SUROKON,
OAoa on Market Street, Clearfield, Pa.
vr-filto. boon: I to 11 a. at., and 1 lo p. at.
I)
R. J. KAY VTRIGLEY,
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN,
t-Br-OSW adjoining the raiidanea af Jamai
fl K., oa Heooad St, Vlaarteld, Pa.
Jl;l,'7 U.
C.JENKINS, M. D.,
I'llYSICIAN AND SCRQEON
i
Cl RffENSVILLE, PA.,
i 1 ! al ra.ldaare, eoraer of Rule aad Pine
Mt.. Jaa. Hb, IHBl tf.
J)U. II, B. VAN VALZAH,
(I.KARFIKI.I), PKNN'A.
''I Flff IN RESIDENCE, CORNER OF FIRST
AND PINE STREETS.
OtW boora From 11 to 1 P. M.
Ma; 11, 1I7.
1)
U. J. I'. BURCHFIELD,
l. Sargaoa of Iba lid teglmeat. Piaaijl.aela
Volaataara, baring reteraed Iroai the Arm;,
I.ra kli profenleaal urelael te Iheelliaeaa
'Cl.atl.ldao.nt;.
Prof.iaioBalaalll prompll; atlaadel te.
Me ea Beaoad .treat, tormarl; !,
"r.Woodi. aprB,'M-M
GEO. B. QOODIANDEB, Editor 4 Proprietor. PRINCIPLES, NOT MEN. TEBMS-$2 per annnm in Advance .
VOL. 55-WIIOLE NO. 2,729. CLEARFIELD, PA., WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 1881. NEW SERIES-VOL. 22, NO. 27.
WILLIAM M. HENRY, Jubtici
or tmu Plici aid BciiTBRf k. LUMDBR
CITY. CollMtiotii mid tod Bona prompt,;
paid etr. Artie 1m of kcraiBDt ftod dtada of
oarayano bmUj ai Mated ad warranted eor
reel or bo abarga. IJJt'TI
HENRY BRETIl,
(oitbro p. o.)
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE
roa bell Towainir.
Ha; I, 1TS--
JAMES MITCHELL,
BtALBB IB
Square Timber & Timber Lands,
J.11'71 CLEARFIELD, PA.
V. UOYT,
Land Surveyor aniCivil Engineer,
PniLIPSBURO, PA.
etAll baiiaeai will be atuada I to promptly.
Deo. IS, 18801;.
REUBEN HACKMAN,
House and Sign Painter and Paper
Hanger,
Clearfield, Peun'a.
ta.Will eaeeate Joba la bll line DromptlT and
In aworkmanllka manner. arrl,fl7
PRANK FIELDING
L1 AND
WILLIAM I). B1GLER,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
Nor. 1 7th, U10.lt.
WEAVER & BETTS,
DBALBBB !
Real Estate, Square Timber, Saw Logs,
AND LUMBER OF ALL KINDS.
Cr.Oflt am RnA . I . I t. .
moia of Ueorge Wearer A Co. jant, '78 lf.
RICHARD HUGHES,
JVSTICE OF THE PEACE .
-por
Ifrcntur Township,
Oioaola Mill. P. 0.
II offloial bailneia Bntra.teil to bin will be
promptl; attended la. mohSV, '71.
EI
AURY SXYDKK,
BARDbH AND IIAIRDHESSKH.
Bbup on Market Si., oppoitte Court Houii.
A aleaa towel for every eaitomer.
Alio dealer in
Ueft llranda of Tobacco and Cgar.
CloarAald. Pa.
nar lt, tl
JAMES K. TURNER,
Jl'STICE OF TUS PEACE,
Wallaceton, Pa.
Jter-He ha prepared bimeelf with all tbe
neeeuarj blank forini ander tbe Pern ioa and
Boontr law, aa well ae blank Deede, ete. All
Ugel matter o trailed to bii ere will reeWe
prompt attentloa. Mae Tib, 187V. tf.
Q. H. HALL,
PRACTICAL TUMP MAKER,
NEAR CLEARFIELD. PENN'A.
dr-Pumps aiwaya oa band and Bade to order
en tbort notloa. Pipe bored oa reaeooabte term.
All work warranted to render eat i (faction, and
delivered tfdealred. BiT36:.rpd
JLlvery IHtable.
THE andarelffned bee;i leave to In torn, thepab
lle that he is bow full j prepare to aeeommo
date all la the way of furnishing H-.tes, Buirgles,
tladdlee and Harness, on tbe shortest aottoe and
bb reasonable terms. Residence on Loenst street,
between Third and Fourth.
MEO. W. OEARIIART.
Claarflald. Feb. 4, 1874.
THOMAS H. FORCEE,
BBALBB IB
GENERAL MEHCU AND1SK.
CRAHAMTUN, Pa.
Allo,eltenalre manniatirtr and dealer In Rqaara
llmoer ana nawea Lamneroi an ainui,
aT-Ordara aollolted and all bllli promptl;
Iliad. rj;i'
S. I. SNYDER,
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
ARB DBALRB IB
jWntcho", Clocks nd Jewelry,
0raAaia'l Bow, Harlfi Strut,
CI.EABtIEI.I), PA.
All bind, of repairing la m; line promptl; Bl
ended to. Jan. lit, 1S7D.
oaaanu. L. biodlr.
Clearfield Insurance Agency.
HKnn k nittiti.r., Jr'n",
R.preienttba following anl other Bnt-olui Co'a
Companlaa. AMeta.
Llrerpool London A Olcih.-U. g. ISr..tl.Sl,
Lveomiognn mutual A oa.h plana. . B,0no,OOB
I'bienil, of llartford, Conn I, (14.08
Insurance Ce. of North America 6.43M74
North Brltl.h A Mrroantlle U. 8. Br. 1,!H,8IM
rVotli.b t'oaimeretalU. B. Braarh.... 87r,i4e
Watartown T4,l
Trarelara (Life A Aecldeat) 4,i5.4M
Offlce on M.rhet Ht., epp. Oeart Mooee, Clear.
Bald. Pa. Jnna I, tf.
JjlOB TINWARCI, IIARDt
ARE,
HOUSE FDMISHINO GOODS,
aad
NEEDLE.", ATTACUMKNT8 AND PARTS,
and all klnda of
MEWING MACHINES,
(10 TO
0. B. MKRRELL, Agent,
CLEARFIELD, PA. (June 1, 'HO If.
Insurance Agency
or
WILUAM 0. HELMBOLD,
Pa 1 1 on Work, (urtrtntrillf, Pa.
Companies Represented i
Catomereial Vnlna lat. Co., Aemi.H,H",7(ll 15
Firemen'! Fond Inl. Co .A.eala l.lM.OIIBil
I nioa Imnraaea Ca.. AilaU 1,120.0.17 8
Trarelere' Aeeident Inl. Oo.. Aaeela.. t,tll,IB411
Xortbera laa. Co. of Now Yarh Ai'ta Ml,lll OB
Iniaranee plaeed oa all kiadi of propart; at
equitable raua.
Cnrweoa.llle, Pa, Feb. Id, IMMf.
THE MUTUAL BENEFIT
LIFK INSURANCE COMPANY,
Newark, If. 4
INCORPORATED IM4. PTRELT Ml'TPAL.
A as arte, Jaa. 1, t8l, as asMrtelaed
bT KianlRiBR Cotaiatssinaere
aaf U.Mtwhiieetla.Ubte aad New
jmnt9 ; A.u,rt,i 91
Ltiiiutiea, as statad by the easae. 11,111,438 84
fltrarme bj Mass shu'e Btaodard- 8,(U,Mi 08
Si artrt bj New Verb Standard... I,t88,t 8
AH poHeleeaeafbrfblUble after eeMiad
year i leweipaeeet leritedlrldeads He
el arid aad paid erery yar slaee orgtB
tealton i ample surplus : surrender rallies
sanet liberal j los-es procopily adjasted
aad paid.
OrrtrBii :
LEWIS 0. (1ROVKR, PnasiPtjiT.
JAMBS B. PKAR8'N, Vtca-PaaaiaeaT.
En. L itoanae, Pee . Tese. MeouetTT, Traat.
POTTER A KEY Kft, rteta AgeaU. 411 sj
aal street. Pblledelpbla, Pa.
R. M. M'KHAIJ.r.Spelel A(tt. OAea la
Moeeop'i batldiai, Market street, Clearleld, Pa.
WITHERED ROSES.
Withered roeleavea la ea urn
Erar? where our flanees turn,
Time old graves uoeovers.
Many a delaty, perfumed Bote,
ilao'li'long eold usee aerinly wrote,
il id iicn here by lovers.
Abt the nanly hearts, aow eold,
Ab 1 tbe Beta'rie. sweet end old.
This quaint room discloses.
All tbe weraitb te ebill to-day;
All the life has passed away ,
Naught ii left but roiee
Roies, a Ithered now an J dead ,
All Ibnfr aoolent swee.neis fled
With their ancient splendor.
As I bend above, I feel
A raj ue fragrance tnm thorn steal.
Like a mom'ry tender.
Of their olden pie at ant days,
When tbe sun's rich golden blite
Kfseed their cheeks to glory.
Ah 1 the peln these mam 'He giro !
Ab t the pain that one nuit lira
When our life's sweet tory.
Holds do more tbe olden joy !
Of whatvieaTelued toy
Vt ban its charm Is broken f
Of our life when youth Is o'er
Of the paet which oomee no more.
Are three Sowers tbe token.
When the sod baa lost Its light,
When tbe fell of Winter's Bight
Our Aulomn-tide o'er eloee
Call we then the mem'ries sweet
Of Ihnie vanished moments fleet
Aabes of youth's roses t
MEETING AT LOSQ II RANCH.
GARFIELD AND GRANT SHAK
ING HANDS.
ANXIKTT AND EXCITEMENT OF TIH COT-
TAOEK8 WHEN THE (JREAT PRK8I
DENT ANDTHE QUEAT EX'PREH
IUENT CAME TOOETUER
ORANT AND HIS FU
TURE, AND OAR
FIELD AND
UF.ALTU.
Wo happened to beat Long Branch
when these two Radical chumpionn mot
faco lofaec. ThcgOHeiping was gigantic.
Wo nil! alli.w Mr. Lambert tlie cor-
rcti)oideiit ol thojFbiludi'lpbiii 7"t'mcs,
in a letter dated Juno 2iith, to portray
tbo Bfcno a fjllowH :
Tbo final mcctiniiof President Oar-
field and Ex President (.irantbaslifted
an awful load of anxiety from tbo
mind of tho averago visitor to Long
llranch. Hundreds peoiilo seem to
have como hero for the particular pur
pose of seeing tbo illustrious men moet,
and many of them stood around for
several days with thoir hands in their
pockets wondering what sort ol a scowl
(I runt would give Garfield and what
kind of laces Uarfleld would mnko at
Grant Calculations have been mado
as to whether either of tbo parlies
carried concealed weapons, and tho
court tuilora were appealed to fur in
formation as to wuetlior it has been
customary to build tho Presidential
pantaloons with pistol pockets or oth
erwise; tho weight of tho boots of
each man was oonsidored and the
probablo propelling force calculated,
but on none of tlieso points was any
satisfactory conclusion reached. For
threo days, liowovcr, people weni
around witb buckets, prepared to save
tbe blood of tho great men wbon the
collision came, and thoro wcro the
strongest evidencos of agony and deep
concern among all the cottagors up
and down tho beach for miles.
SCOWLING ACROSS THE STREET.
For threo day Mr. (iarflold had
lived just across tho drivo from Mr.
Grant and Mr. Grant had lived just,
across tba drivo from Mr. Garfield. It
was exactly the eamo distanco from
the cottago where Grant was to tbo
hotel where Garfiold was as from Gar
field's hotel to tbe (rant cottage, but
the dixtanco either way was too great
for either to travol. It was, howevor,
just about the right distance for a man
to see without glasses, ana it was weu
known to every man, woman and child
in this place that Ex President Grant
spent tbo greater part of his daylight
time behind tbe window shutters of
the hmiPM) trying to see what Presidont
Garfield was np to across tho way.
At Ibis identical time Presidont Gar
field occupied an cligiblo position bo
hind the window shutters ot tbe LI
boron Hotel, whoro he closely watcbod
overy Buspicious movement of tho ox
silent man across tbe avenue. Tbo
strain of all this upon imaginative peo
ple here was simply awful. It would
nave been a great relief if one great
man had dared the other groat man
halfway; it would hnvo been still
more gratifying if Garfield bad gone
out into tbo middlo of tho road and
strutted around with a chip on bis
shoulder, or if Grant had dared Gar
field to como insido tbo fenco, or if any
thing in tbe world could havo happen
ed it would have boon very pleasant
to the expectant crowds who daily
hung around to ace fair play.
HOW Tllir FINALLY MET.
Rut the mooting finally occurred.
The great President . and tbe great ex
President got tired glaring at each
other through the window shuttors.
Tho Presidont wont out to rido and
the cx President wont out lo walk,
and they moat unaccountably encoun
tered eaeb other. It was one of thoso
mornings when Grant bad forgntton
to tako his pistol Irom under his pillow
and put it into his pocket, and as be
felt around under his coat tails for it
be turned white and began to wondor
if he bad left bia will and his Mexican
Railroad and the third term in good
order. Ho felt certain that Garfiold
would got the drop on him, and he re
garded complacently, aa a brave man
can, tbe closing moraonts ot an event
ful lilo. lie did not know that Gar
fiold bad mis laid his bowie-knife and
be was not near enough to tho Presi
dent to see that bo turned palo at the
discovery. This was a tilualion fur
two mon whom tho newspapers and
tho gossips had got Into a tamper to
cbow each other in pieces. 1 hoy had
finally mot and neithor had a weapon.
There waa not even a club or a stono
within reach. A soore or more specta
tors, who had assembled to gather up
the fragment of greatness after the
fight should ond, wore brouthlora with
fear. Prosidont Garfield looked at
ex-Prosident Grant and raised his hat ;
ox-PresidcntGrantlookod at President
Garfiold'and raised bis hat; the one
drovo away; tho othor walked on, and
the war waa over.
You mast have noticed the way in
which all this waa done, much as
couple would flirt and finally meet on
a pleasant afternoon in the Park. A
lady who entirely understood these
thing pronounced the affair "just too
sweet and lovely for anything."
THE RELATIONS OF Till MIX,
Tbo olhcr meeting between Garfiold
and (irant took place yesterday, and
lias boon described in lb dispatches
from boro. It was a purely formal
affair, Genoral Grant having gone over,
as a lot of cottagors had, to a reception
of tbe Presidont, There i, nothing in
common between those men, bo t oeit her
is aa tmall aa the average of people
who have been talking about tbem
here for torn day seem o indicate.
Garfiold, at the beginning of bia ad
ministration, asked Grant for somo ad-
vieo, and got somo, but as tbe advico
ho got waa not exactly tbo kind be
asked for bo laid it aside. He may
have it snmowhoro around tbe house
yot, but if ao it is covered with dust.
That, of course, rathor hurt the feel
ings of tho late Presidont. Ho had no
further ubc for Garfield, and bia rela
tions are now purely formal.
A prominent friend of Grants said
yesterday that tbe advantages of a
good understanding botwoon Grant
and the Presidont wore appreciated
particularly among Grants menus.
Kx-Colleclor Murphy, who has boon
with the ex President almost constant
ly for a week, has boon working very
sinceroly to bring about an under
standing which should be useful in a
political way, but it boa not yot been
accomplished. Tho scheme back of
it includes the roturn ukdimcoe ConkJ
ling to tbo Senate, which is part of tho
arrangement that tho President will
not likely consent to.
THE FUTURE OF ORANT.
"Grant," said a business friend ot
that eminent citizen, "should take his
mind out ot politics. It is nonsenso
to talk of ovor again making him
tho President of tho United .States,
and I havo reason to know that Grant
himself has givon up the notion. What
ho wants to do now is to lot tbe poll-
tieians, whether Conkling or anyone
else, take careof themsolvcs. It they
can't do it without Grant's help, let
thorn go. Grant's future is all right.
uis children aro all looking alter them
selves. Fled and Vlysses, Jr., aro in
the railroad business with all tho ad
vantages tbut could bo desired, while
Jubho here is already well fixed, having
mado a lot ol money in somo lorlunato
miningspeoulations. Theoldman my
informant was referring in his familiar
way to friend Grant "bns got some
thing laid up and there ia a quarter of
a million to be given him in a abort
time. Ho needn't bother himself about
the future and if bo takes tho advico
of friends ho will find a good place to
live and settle down and not Iota news
paper man como any wbcie in tho same
word."
"Why do you say that 7"
"Well, a man liko Grant can't do
too little talking to tbe newspapers.
lie has some grievances which he
wants to talk about, but overy man's
grievances look mighty small wbon
they got intoprint and it always seems
to mo the bigger a mnn is the smaller
his griovanco looks. Just put it down
as official, young man, that Grunt will
never again bo a candidate for Presi
dent." 1 was willing to bcliovo what
tho man caid, because all of Grant's
friend's hero aro saying much thosatno
thing.
THE ORANT COTTAOR.
Tho Grunt collage looks rusly'and
almost dilapidated, and it appears still
worse because it stands next to 31 r.
Georgo W. Child's cottago, which baa
been put In its hummer attiro, witb
now paint, a closely cropped lawn and
a profusion of flowers on tho balconies
and about tbe windows whicb bido a
largo part of tho cottago from view.
There is not a neater looking placo
along the beach drivo anywhore than
Mr. Cnilds , and there is not a less at
tractive looking ono than General
Grant's. Tbo Grant cottago needs
paint on tho outsido and whitewash on
the insido. Tbo grass needs culling,
tho trocs need irimmingandtho lonces
are demanding repair. It has been
given out that all thoso things would
be dono, but there has so fur bocn no
commencement. Mcuntimo tho ex
President ia comfortably domiciled at
tho modoat cottage of his lucky son,
Josso, whore he smokes and reads and
receives bis friends. Thoro are not a
great many callers, however, and the
ex-President goes and comes in a quite
ordinary way now, taking frequent
walks and attracting little attention.
Ho likos tho illustrated pnpors, which
ot late have had several cartoons of
him, and bo laughs at them in tho tit
most good nature.
Grant likos being in what is called
tbe Klbcron part of tbo town. Tho
toshionubla drill is that way and all
tbe mora elegant cottuges now build
ing aro in that quarter. Why those
struoturea should bo called cotlages ia
beyond tbo understanding of ordinary
people ; many ot thorn are palaces.
Commodore Garrison, for instance, is
finishing one which will cost him
ninety thousand dollars and he will
have lo buy his furniture out ot
another fund.
THE PRESIDENT'S HOLIDAY.
Garfield expects to leave hero to
morrow and roturn to business at
Washington, but ho will come back
again after awhilo. He has enjoyed
this brief holiday very much, and will
go away improved. Thoro waa no one
who needed tbe restoration more.
Garfield doesn't look as ho did a littlo
moro than a year ngo when at tho
Chicago Convention, but bo has soon
a great dcul of trouble since then and
has a groat deal moro to sco before he
gets through with bis experience as
the Chief Magistrate. He told ono of
tho Pennsylvania editors who were
here during the week that ho should
suppose editing country newspaper
would atlord moro Inn and bo lur eas
ier than serving us President. Un
doubtedly Garfield is right, but there
woro some of tbo Pennsylvania editors
wbo would havo tradod places with
him. J. 11. L.
THE ESC A TLX 0 STEAM.
Topnoody mado up his mind tho
other day that ho was not going to be
boesed any longer hy bis wile, so when
he wont homo at noon he stalked in
and called out imperiously:
"Mrs. Topnoody, Mrs. Topnoody I"
Mrs. T. camo out of the kitchen
with a drop of swoat on the end ot her
nose, a dish rag tied around hor head
and a rolling pin in her band.
"Well, air," she said, "wbnl'll you
have 7 "
Topnoody staggorod, but braced up.
"Mrs. Topnoody, 1 want you lo un
derstand, Madam," and he tapped
bia breast dramatically"! am tbo en
gineer ol this establishment."
"Oh. vou are. are von 7 Well. Top
noody, I want you to understand that
I and she looked dangerous "am
the boiler that will blow up and sling
tho engineer clear over inlo the next
county, lo you bear the escaping of
tbe steam, lopnoodyr
Topnoody heard it, and be meekly
inquired if there waa any assistance
he could render in the housework.
Patient old lady : "I have been
great sinner for more than eighty
years and didn't know It." Old col
ored servant : "I knowed it all de
time! "
Phort courting:: "Rachaol, tbe Lord
bath sent me to marry thee," aaid the
suitor. "The Lord a will be done.
waa the submissive reply.
HIGJ1 UEELS AND LAME
BACKS.
A SIMPLE CURE FOR A FASHIONABLE DIB
ODER SOME PECULIARITIES OF TUE
FEMININE MIND.
A Now York reporter, crossing the
Fulton ferry some days ago, was made
an unwilling listener to some fem
inine confidences on backache As all
women and tbo grcotor part ot their
mon folks are directly or indirectly in
toroxled in tho subject, tho reporter
visited a man of science who was nam
ed by ono of tho young ladies as hav
ing cured bor trouble
"Oh, yes," said tho doctor ; "back
acho is very common among women ;
moro than two-thirds ol thorn suffer
from it. liut there is ono kind of this
trouble, caused bja provoiling fushion,
which women ouht not to allow them
selves to sutler f "."
"Alo you i. st e'Saiist for fashionable
backache 7"
Tho doctor laughed. "I will tell you
all about it," said be "Throe years ago
a fashionable young lady called upon
me, saying that hor back was very
lamo, and bad been so for a considera
ble tinio. Tho pain had lately so greatly
increased that she had become fright
ened about herself. She had been
obliged to shorten ber promenades, so
she said, was almost incapable of dana
ing, and ber life was gradually becom
ing a burden. She had "tried every
thing, and taken medicine all the lituo,
but and tben she broke down in such
a way that I began to suspect hysteria.
"Sho looked tired, and bor faco boro
an expression of pain and dospondoncy
whicb was not compatible with her
years sho was about twenty three
nor ber evidencos of constitutional
force, which I judged to bo strong. 1
confess 1 was at a loss to account for
her trouble, and closo questioning gave
me no indications for treatment. 1 at
last prescribed a tonic on general
principles and asked ber to call in
about a wock. When sho appeared
again, a glance sufficed to show that she
wus no belter, and 1 was much puzzled
as I saw bor walk up and down tbo
office in nervous excitemont, exclaim
ing that she would never get well, she
knew she wouldn't, etc. As 1 lookod,
a certain peculiarity in ber walk led
mo to think that thcro might bo some
spinal troublo, and I commenced a
cross examination, which sho brought
to a sudden close by saying: "Why,
doctor, sovernl of my friends aro suf
fering just as 1 am, but they aro not
yet ao worn out with tho pain ; wo can
not all have spinal complaints, can wo?"
"I thought it impoBsiblo, of cotirso,"
continued tho doctor, "and tho inter
view ended by mo asking bur to call
again on tho next day and bring ono
of her friends with ber, whon 1 would
mako anothor effort to discover the
real causo ot tho troublo. I bad, in
loot, made np my mind that some
peculiarity in dress was at tbo root of
tho dillloulty. Tho ladies called and
had hardly traversod the ollieo whon 1
observed in patient number two tbo
same idiosyncrasy in walking which I
had soon in the nrst patient, i was
not long in discovering that tbe real
difficulty lay in the high and tapering
hoots of my patients' gailors. Closer
examination revealed tbo fact that
thcro was a difference in tbo height of
the boot heels of tbo ladies, and 1 found
that my first pationt, who was tho
great sufferer, was the one who pos
sessed tho bigbor bools. Thcro was
nothing to do but to proscribe suppers
and woolon stockings for a week, to
bo followed by the wearing ol shoes
having low, broad heels."
"And it was this treatment tnul
cured tho backache?"
'All signs of lamoncsB disappeared
within eleven days, and my first pa
tient of this kind, togothor with many
who havo followed ber, regained their
health and atrongth. There aro many
physiological rcaxons why undue oleva-
Uon ot Hie hoc! must cause Irouiuo. it
will sulllco to say that it serves to
throw forward the contents of the ab
dominal cavity, and the muscles, nerves
and cords more or loss connected with
or surrounding tho back aro subjected
to unusual strain in resisting tho tor
ward impulse. Of courso, in such
cases, lamo back is not of itself a dis
oasc, but only the indication ot deep-
seated trouble, which is sometimes
diflicult to deal witb. Ladies should
be warned that this fashion in beels is
cortaln lo bring them soonor or lator
great troublo. If they must adhere to
tho prevailing style, thoy should lane
caro to woar slippers on overy possiblo
occasion which the tacrcd duties they
owo to fashion may pormit. That a
porson may as well be out ot tbo world
as out of tbo fashion is a law more in
exorable in the minds of many women
than those ol nature or ot health.
G HA YE YARD IX S URA XCE.
OPINION OF AN EMINENT PENNSYLVANIA
JURIST,
Touching this important subject,
tho venorablo Judge Pearson, of llar
rlsburg, says : "I am well satisfied
that a largo portion of the insurance
companies supported for tho purpose
of insuring lives are public nuisances,
and that those carrying them on,
thoso acting as agents, and thoso act
ing as inspecting physicians for tbem
ought to bo indicted and convicted for
misdemeanor, and that they enter Into
a conspiracy in establishing such insti
tutions and in conducting them in tho
manner they do. Wo know not mere
ly by publio report in tbe newspaper.,
but by what has been tried frequently
in tho courts, that thoae, tho men in
terested in these insurance ofllcoa, are
sometimes porfoctly honest. Generally
speaking, tbey know what is going on.
Anu iney Bomoumea anow mat wdul
ia going on is neither honest nor sale.
The physician who certifies to a man
being a good and suitable subject, a
proper porson to have bis life insured,
know well he ia over eighty-fivoycani
of ago, teeblo and miserable, and at
the same timo hardly expects to live a
year, and yot thoy will insure him for
twenty, thirty or forty thousand dol
lars on his lilo, not in iavoroi relatives,
but in favor of some person or other
who hire him to use bis name to bavo
tho insurance taken. Those thing
unquestionably are a high misdemean
or. They are conspiracy to cheat
It ia an evidence to choat. It ia an
evidence to choat on tbe part of those
who manage tbe company II iney
know what is done. I is a conspiracy
to choat on the part of the physician
tho parly who certltioa to cases of that
kind on those who take insurance
Thcv cannot recovor a penny on thorn
if they only know it, but al the same
time thtry are misleading mar.y. In a
neighboring county it led to a case of
murder, where mon were banged
lor a crime of thi kind. They con
spired to gel la man'a life insured,
whicb they did, in a oonsldorable sum
of money, Tbey font d thai he would
not die quick enough and tbey put
hitn to death. The whole ia a nui
sance, deceiving thoso who onler into
them. A man goes there be imag
ines he can tako insurance on the lile
of a man whom be would not trust
witb $25. Ho tukos an insuaanco on
his life tor 15,000 and pays the insur
ance for a year or two and calls that a
fair business. It is such a transaction
that could not bo recoverable in any
court. Tho man is cheating himself
as well as the community. I have
long intended to call the attontion of
tho grand jury to offenses of this kind
that bavo not been committed here,
but in tho neighboring counties of
Lebanon, Lancaster and Berks thoy
havo become vory common. But they
aro becoming common here and will
lead to great evil unless stopped, and
the effectual way to stop them is to in
dict the insuranco companies and to
indict those wbo act as their agents.
They bavo no interest in tho lives of
tho porson. A man nan elt'ocl insur
ance where thore is an insurablo inter
est, as a relative, but wbon insuranco
is in favor of a total stranger it is
strong evidence of an Intention to do
fraud, and such would disable them
from ovor recovering a penny on tho
policy. Lot it go on for a littlo while
longer and it will lead to murdor.
Thoso person will get tired ol paying
on tbe policy. Hero to a person who
don't own a ponny ono whom no ono
would trust with a ponny and nobody
expects to livo six months. Yet thoy
will tako insurance on his life for fifty
or sixty thousand dollars. This is
done by strangers. It is practiced
daily and is in violation of the law. 1
should have no hesitation in convict
ing any agent of a company who took
insuranco of that kind, no hesitation
of convicting for conspiracy. Only a
fow days ago an old man com
plained of tbom having insured his life
for :W,000, and thoy wore lo give
him $25, but only paid him (8. This
is a species of tbe worst kind of gam
bling. If tho Legislature will pass no
laws to put a stop to such buaincss, tbe
courts of justico, who havo tho morals
and interest of tbo community in their
keeping, will endeavor to look nfterit.
1 should never hesitato a momont to
convict any person who should tako
insurance in that way and under those
circumstances.
C0XD1TI0X OF TJIEJEWS.
Tbo Jews have been wandering up
and down the earth over since tho Ro
mans destroyed Jerusalem. Kinco that
timo tbey have bad no permanent
abiding place. Thoy gave the Chris
tian religion to tho world, and to-day
tho Christians in Russia arodostroying
thoir property, and driving them in
many instanco beyond tho boundaries
of Holy Russia. In the Russian town
along the Austrian frontier tho houses
ot tbe Jews have bocn plundered and
burned. The Jews found it necoesary
to flee for thoir lives across tlw border
to Austrian toil.'
At Odessa, on tho Dniester, near the
Black Sea, the plundering continued
tho entice day. The rich Jews fled,
and the poor witb their families were
left to be taunted and buffeted by a
bowling mob of drunken, brutal men.
At Kieff, on tbe Uncipor, tho syna
goguo was broken open and tbe con
gregation grossly maltreated. Tbo
Jewish quartor of the town was sack
ed. In tbo dark ages the Jowa were
mobbed by Christian and thoir prop
erty destroyed. In this enlightened
nineteenth century, howovor, tho per
secution of the Jews ia ontiroly out of
placo. Thoy aro morointolhgent than
tho native of Russia. They educate
thoir childron better. Tbey aro moro
temperate. Thoy save thoir money
and soon bocomo rich and influential.
Tho Russians a a race aro fearfully
givon to drunkonncss. Evon the priests
get beastly drunk, Whon tho shep
herds fail so doplorably in their duty
what can be expected of tbe flock?
Tbe Jew acknowledge tho power
that be. Thoy don't agitato against
absoluto rulo, and henco the Russian
peasants who bavo boon wronged, kept
in ignorance, degraded, cheated, suffer
ed untold hardships under tbo rule of
an absolute sovereign, doubtless feel
that the Jew have basked in tbo sun
shine of the Czar and grown rich in
contequenco.
And again tho Russian is fearfully
bigoted. Ho firmly bcliovoa thatthoie
is only ono road lo heaven, tho one his
fathers traveled, and ho become wild
with rngo if any man asserts there is
any other road lo that blessed abodo.
The Jews for age past havo traveled
anothor road.
Thoy toach thoir children that tho
road Abraham, Isaac and Jacob trav
eled leads to heaven. In consequence
the peasants become aroused against
tho .lows whorevor donso ignorance
and bigotry prevail. A ahhrt time ago
tho Germans were agitated against the
.lows, but not being bigots m religion,
tbo Jew woro not mobbod. Tbe Jew
past timo have suffered fearful in
justice at tho hands of Kuropean na
tions.
Timely Hintb. On tho contrary
vines and croepcrs on tho wall pro
tect thorn, and make a bonne warmer
and dryer, and also mako it look much
better.
The host oil for making boot and
harness leather soft and pliable is ca
tor oil.
Glycerino is excellent to. rub on
chafes, burns or chapped hands or sun
scald.
Raw bi'los make the bost and most
durablo bolting for farm or other ma
chinery. Put tho hair siilo next' to
the pulley.
Wbito lead ground in oil is an ox
celled application for saddle chafes
or harness or yoke gall on horse or
cattle.
Keep your boot well oiled in winter
and they will lust longer, while your
feet will be dryer and warmer.
A few drops of diluted carbolio acid
in a kettle of glue will kocn it from
spoiling for several day in the warm-
est weather.
Autumn ia tho propor (oason to pro-
pare gialt and cuttings. Of tbe latter
cuttings of grapes, currant, quinces,
goosoborries, poplar and many other
plants, taken off in the t all ana ouriea
in the ground all Wintor, will grow
with facility in tho Hpring. Graft
should aiwaya bo taken off in the Fall
and kept in moist sand or sawdust till
ready to use.
Chloride of Lime. A French jour
nal state that chloride of lime scat-
tored about where rat and mice fre
quent will cause tbem to desert the
spot. A aolution ol it brushed ovor
plant will effectually protect them
Irom Insect. 1 1 scattered over ground
infested with grubs, it will froe it of
them entirely. Hunches ol cotton or
tow smeared with a mixture of chlo
ride of lime and hog's lard, and tied
about in different part of tree, will
guard It against the attack of insects,
alugagrubs, etc., and drivo away thoae
already in possession.
IN CLOVER.
Loralr, annny, Sumner daj,
la a batntnoak iwinglng,
fiee-nevee brifhtlT fleihinf near,
Happ ainia a-iinain.
Hum of pipe and bum of bee,
Whir of iniaeta blending
In n dream irmpbonr,
Ringe of amoka aeeending
On tbe air to break and fad,
Ureen bwgha erebina orrr,
Fragrance born oa ererf breeu
lan't be in elorar 1
Flower-dotted gran baneath,
Ulna ikr o'er biin lolling,
Pretty girl on eltber lide
Ploeiaatl beguiling
One with faa and ahade wboee tinll.
Wltb the winga are rring
Of the gorgeoul butters ioa
Oarly round them ning,
One with book from whioh iba reada
Hong of maid and lorer
In a roiee of melodr
lin't he In elorer 1 '
NEW GAME LA'S.
Srrri.EMENTB WHICH HAV BE!t ADDED
TO TUE OAMI LAW.
Tho following are tho full text of
several amendment to the general
game law, which were passed by tho
last Legislature and bavo been ap
proved by the Governor :
A lupplement to an Act to amend and eonaolidate
tbe eererel Aeta relating to game and game flib,
approved tbe third day of June, 107S, chang
ing Ihetime for hunting end killing dear, iquir
rtll, rabbit, wild turkeri, pbeaiaota and prai
rie ohiekeni.
That tho first section of tho act to
which thi is a supplement shall be so
amended as to rend and be as follows :
That no person shall kill or pursuo in
any part of this Stato, any elk or wild
deer, save only from the first day of
October in any year, to the tbirty nrst
doy of Doccmbor next following, and
no porson shall havo in his or her pos
session or offer for salo or transport
any elk, wild doer, nnlclopo or fresh
venison, save only from the first day
of October in any year, to the thirty
first day of Docombcr next following.
No person shall at any timo kill any
fawn, when in its spotted coat, or havo
tho fresh skin of any sueh fawn in his
or her possession. No porson shall
pursuo any elk or wild deer with dogs
in any part of this State, or shall kill
in tho water any elk, or wild doer or
fawn which has been driven thereto
by dogs. Any person offending against
any of the provisions of this section,
shall bo deemed guilty of a misdemean
or, and shall bo liablo to a penalty of
lllty dollars, ior eacn oik, wiiu ueer ur
fawn so killed or pursued, or trappod,
or fresh elk, wild deer, antelope, or
fawn skin, bad in bis or ber possession,
and may bo proceeded ngainst in any
county 01 tno mate wnercin no may
be arrested, having tbo saino in his or
her possession ; and providod also that
any dogs pursuing elk, or wild doer,
or lawns, may bo killod by any person,
and any constablo or other town otli
cial may kill any dog that habitunlly
pursues elk, or wild deer or fawns, and
the owner of such dog shall be liable
to a penalty of ten dollars, for each
elk, wild deer or fawn killed by such
dog.
That section twonty-fivo of tho act
to amend and consolidate tbo several
act relative to game and game lish
explanatory of tho same, approved
Juno 3, 1878, be and the samo is here
by amended to read aa follows :
".No person snail by any means or
devico whatsoever oatch or kill in any
of tbe waters of this Slate, any black
bass, green bass, yellow bass, willow
bass, rock bass, Lake Krio or grass
bass. mko. or pickerel, or wall eyed
pike commonly known as Susquehanna
salmon, between tbe nrst day oi Janu
ary and the first day of J uno, nor shall
catch or kill any of said species of fish
at any timo during the year, save only
with a rod, hook and line. Any vio
lation of this section shall bubjoct tho
offender to a ponnlty often dollars for
each and every ollenco ; providod, this
seotion shall not apply lo tbe wators
of Lake brie, except In tbo ponds on
the island or peniusulu forming the
north and east shores ot the harbor of
Krio.
That no person shall at any timo
catch, tako, kill or bavo in his or ber
possession ulter the samo has boon
killed, any speckled trout or California
mountain trout for sale less than five
inches in length, and it shall be unlaw
ful for any person to fish in any stream
in this Commonwealth for a period of
throo year in which brook trout bavo
bocn planted by tbo fish commission
or of the Stato, under a penalty of
twenty dollars as providod for in sco
tion thirty-six ol act ot assembly ap
proved June 3, 1878; providod, public
notico has been given oi said planting
at the timo in any newspaper published
in tho county wbero said streams are
located for the period ot threo weeks,
That it shall be unlawlul. lor any
person or persons to Lake, catch or kill
any shad in the Susquehanna or Juni
ata mors Irom sunset on saturauy un
til sunnso on Monday of any week
during tho run ol said fish from March
15 to Juno Zo ot each year, but fishing
shell bo permitted for said fish from
Monday at sunnso tin bulurday at
sunset of each week during said time
with seine or seines, Dot or nets, not
loss than four and ono-half inches in
tne mesh, measured from knot to knot
diagonally ; that if any porson or per
sons violato the provisions of this sec
tion during the closo time any nsb
warden, constable or ahorifT of any
county in said Commonwealth is here
by empoworcd to arrest the ollender
or ollender on sight and confiscate all
soine or soincs, not or nets, boat or
boats of any kind, and implements of
fishing outside ot any onclosuro used
in connoclioo with tbe same, and sell
the snme at publio auction and appro
prialo tho proceeds loss expense to
tho school fund of said district wboro
the violation occurs; and tbe same
ponaitio of forfeiture shall apply to
any person or persona wbo shall om
ploy or uso in any way wbatovor any
gill or drift soine or seines, not or nets
at any tune, and In addition to the
forfeiture aforesaid the person or per
sons so offending shall be doomed guil
ty of a misdemeanor, and upon con v lo
tion (ball bo fined not exceeding 150
and imprisoned in the county jail for
not less than three months or both or
oilhor at tbe discretion of the court
trying the same.
That section thin) of tho act to which
tin is a supplement to read as follow
Ho person shall kill or expose for sale
or have In hi possession alter ine
same has been killed, any hare, com
monly called rabbit, between tbe first
day of January and the first day of
ftovemher in any year unaor m ponai
ty of (5 for each and overy hare or
rabbit ao killed or exposed for sale or
had In his possession. J0 porson snail
hunt or cause or permit the bunting
of hare or rabbit wltb a lorrol or ler-
rots under a penalty of f 10 for each
and every bare and rabbit caught or
killed by mean of a torrot or lerrou.
All acta or part of acta which are
Inconsistent with this act be and the
same are hereby repealed.
Approved Juno lo, 1HH1.
Henry M. IIoit
Aa Aot to amend pari af aa Aet entitled an Aet
lo amend and eonaolidate tne aavirai Aeta ra
lating to game and game tub.
That soction fiftoen of tho act enti
lied an act to amend and consolidate
the soveral acts relating to game and
game fish, approved June 3, 1878,
which provide as lollows, namely:
"Mo person shall kill, catch or discharge
any firearms at any wild pigoon while
on ita nosting ground or break up or
in any manner disturb such nesting
ground or the bird tboreon, or dis
charge any firearm within one-fourth
of a mile of such nosting place of any
wild pigeon or pigoons, or shoot at,
maim or kill any wild pigoon or pigoon
within tboir roostings under a penalty
of twenty dollars; provided, That no
person except citizens of tbis Common
wealth snail trap or catch wild pigeons
with nets In any of tbe counties oi tbia
Commonwealth, unlos he shall have
first taken out a hconBO from the coun
ty treasurer in the county in which
said pigoons aro found, for which li
cense be shall pay tho aum of fifty
dollar for tbe uso of said county, un
der a ponalty of one hundred dollars ;
and provided further that no porson
shall at any time or place within tbis
State kill or lake any wild pigeon witb
any net, trap or snare, nor set any
such not, trap or snare for the purpose
of taking or killing any of said pigeons
during tho nesting season, nor shall
any person sell or expose for sale any
of the aaid pigeons alter the same shall
have been no taken or killed, under a
penalty of ten dollar for each bird so
taken, bo and the, same is hereby
amended so that it shall read us follows:
No person shall kill or tako any
wild pigeon or "squab" while on its
roosting ground or break up or in any
manner disturb such nostingor roost
ing ground or the birds there on, or
kill or catch with gun, net or trap or
otherwise lake or destroy any such
pigeon or pigoons within one milo of
any nosting or roosting ground, or
discharge any firearm within one
mile ot any nesting or roosting ground
under a penalty of fifty dollars ; pro
vided, That no person except citizens
of thi Commonwealth shall trap or
catch wild pigeons with nets in any of
the counties ol this Commonwealth
unless ho shall have first taken out a
liconse from tho county .treasurer ot
tbe county in which said pigeon aro
found, for which license bo shall pay
the sum of fifty dollars for the uso of
said county under a penalty oi one
hundred dollar. Approvod Juno 10,
1881. Henry m. Uoyt.
TOADS AMONG PLANTS.
A writer in the London Journal
give somo interesting statements re
specting the toad. In the matter of
feeding he say tbe toad is not vory
particular, oilhor as to quality or quan
tity. Anything that creeps or crawls
ill do tor him wood lice, booties,
spiders, slugs, worms, oven snail with
their shells, aro pnt out ot sight aa il
by magic, tor bo lias a peculiar way of
catching hi proy. lie watches the
moving insect lor a second or two;
tben suddenly darting out his tongue
while at a distanco ol ono or two incbos,
tho insect is snatched np and swallow
ed instantly. Ono evening ho gavo
one a wasp and a bumble boo. Both
wcro snatched up directly and they
commoncod to move, apparently with
out causing tho toad tbe slightest din
comfort, though thoymust havo roachod
his stomach in a tolerably active con
dition. In plant bouses, espocially
forcing houses, where insect increaso
their numbers so rapidly at all seasons,
the toad's services are espocially valu
able; and ii a suitable ladder, madeol
narrow board with bit oi lath tackod
on it two inchoa apart, bo set in a cor
nor, slanting from tbe door to tho stage,
bo will climb It, and thus bo enablod to
make himself still moro useful. But
porhaps tho most romarkablo fact con
corning the toad is, that though bo
can, and does, eat a groat deal, be can
exist a long time without eating any
thing, lcara ago bo buried one lor a
month in the earth, a an experiment,
and when dug up it waa apparently aa
well as evor. Moro recently, having
boon bothered with myriads of wood
lico in an early cucumber house, and
not being able to nnd toads In febru-
ary, he lator on, when thoy bocame
plentiful, buried three in a nine-inch
pot, with a elate on top, eighteen
inches under Iho ground, that bo might
have them handy lor the next early
forcing season. Rut that season be
did not require them, so thoy romain
ed buried until tbe following one, and
were then, on being taken up, appar
ently not much tho worBe for thoH
eighteen months' fast, though thoy did
not bavo any ico water or alcoholic
bath.
INTERESTING TO NATURAL
ISTS. WORM THREE HUNDRED FEET UNDER
AROUND.
From the Gold Hill (NaT.) Newl.)
A .AVife reporter has been shown a
queer species of worm found in the
lace of the Lord of Oorno Mino, near
Lower Gold Hill. They are found in
a solid stratum of atifty clay, 700
foct from tho mouth of the tunnel,
and 300 feet below the surface of tbe
earth, amid the voin matter of that
portion of Comostock. Superintendent
Mi: Don gal lound quite a number of
them by soaking and washing the clay,
and they are no defunct relic of ante
diluvian times, but aro all alivo and
kicking, incredible as it may appear.
These quoer littlo subterranean worms
are about throe quarter ot an inch
long by about an eighth of an inch in
diametor, short and thick, resembling
somo species of grub. Kach ia incased
In a very neat littlo shell of siliceous
material, corrugatod and firm, of a
blgish cast, liko a silver ore, with
small round spots, having a molallio
lustre. At his forward end appear a
vicious-looking little head and six leg
or feeder capable of being easily folded
whon he draw back into hie shell.
On top ot his bead is a small helmet
or cover, of the same material as the
shell, ao thai when he haul in for a
soooT.e or self protection hi lop piece
or holmot Just closes tbe hole nicely.
Why thi hard shell covering or pro
tective armor, or how it is that those
very peculiar worm are found alive
in such a depth ol ground, i not easy
ot explanation. Their presence can
bo aooountod for on the score of some
deep crack or disturbance of the earth
at some time, yot what thoy am doing
there and what support tbom is a
mystery, for the cly i noway rich,
though 11 la wormy. I hey certainly
aro a great natural curiosity.
What a man wants all he can get
What a woman want all sho can't
Fame is like a pig with a greased
tail hard to hang on to.
Pop go lo the bappy land of ca-
lllliv, vuv lata fu lu ui i-uimvu.
Thomas C. Hopkins, of Weal Deca
tur, won a prize at the close of the
Summer session of Dickinson Seminary
at WilliamsporL
Tbe School Board of Chest town
ship aro electing a new school bouse
at McGarvey' Ridge ior occupancy
tho coming Winter.
Wo held tbe first examination of
teacher for tho current year at Pino
Grove school house, in Lawrence
township, on Thursday, June 30th.
The annual examinationa will be
held this year during the month of
September, and probably will com
mence in August. The programme
will be published about the first of Au
gust. In general, prido is at tbe bottom oi
all great mistake. All the other
passions do occasional good, but where
prido put in it word, everything
goo wrong, and what might be desir
able to do quietly and innocently, it ia
morally dangorou to do proudly.
liusktn.
Col. J. F. Copeland, of the Stato of
Indiana, has beenongagodasa lecturer
and instructor at our next County In
stitute. Col. Copeland is pronounced
"Tho Prince of Orators" and it re
quired more than ordinary effort to
secure hi services, aa bo is in great
demand everywhere.
Tho Pine Grove Normal School, in
Lawrence township, taught by Miss
Mary C, Weld, cloBcd on Thursday,
June 30tb, witb an examination by the
County Superintendent. The class
exhibi tod very careful trainingin every
branch of study. Kight member were
licensed to teach in the public schools.
Rev. Samuol Mile delivered an ex
cellent lecture before the New Wash
ington Normal School on June 29th.
rhe subject of his lecture waa "The
Boyond," irom which he delivered a
discourse full of inspiration, leaving the
most favorable impressions with bi
hearers. Rev. Mr. Miles i an ardent
worker in the cause of religion and
education.
The Lock Havon State Normal
School stands at tbe head of all the
Slate school again thi year, having
recently graduated ii pupil out of a
class of 4-. Tho applicants were well
prepared lor the examination and
seemed to exhibit great mental and
physical strength.
1 be school seems to attract students
from alt parts ot tbo Stato and much
larger this than former years. Aim
matter of interest to those who are ac
quainted with the ichool we subjoin
the name of thoae who graduated
June 2 1st, with the counties repre
sented, viz :
BaMKa.
oaBRTtBs.
Clinton.
.H Clinton.
,. Clinton.
-Dauphin.
...Herka.
...Clinton.
.....Leeomibg.
.Clinton.
Potter.
Emma S. Rrawn
I. Frank Hear; .............
Elgar L. Kaub
8. H. llemperlj .............
Tillia alantlne
Ella Wllliaati
Libbla Lowe.
Alloe nail
Carrie BiahopM
fc.lt Carroll..
..Clinton.
Uueiie Wolfenden -Clinton.
Marr A. Waltera
Clinton.
Emma Ileacook-,.....
Kate Paxtoa
Lnof Goreon.
...Columbia.
...... ....Lyooming.
. Cape May, N.I.
York.
Potter.
. Clinton.
Union.
Bmdlerd.
....Clinton.
Annie M. Qulokel
Florenoe lloilanbeek-.
Mary M. Yardley.
Annie bonnnra
Nellie Aitell
Claire Waggoner
brnma af. Waltera....
Cllnlaa.
Jaoob Haboob .Snyder
W. 11. Bombard..
Lyeomiag.
George Wylie
...cemeron.
...Denpbia.
....Clintoa.
......Centre.
John llantaberger
Jatreal Wometdorf.......
W. R. Leather
Cherlea Keleon.
Potter.
W. II. Rich Cliatoa.
J. A. Uallagher.....
....Cl.ar4.ld.
A. W. tiebanak
W. Lererty
'leorre Reerdoa ........
...Centra.
.....Clinton.
Clinton.
.........Clerloe.
Potter.
..Potter.
.....Huntingdon.
-Lyooming.
.....Cameron .
.... Perry.
,. Clintoa.
1. J. Wolfe
Thurlow ureeamaa .
Mark 8. H array
Prloe Urafiiul w
W. R. Rillar
Mitchell U. hook. .11.
h'mmet M. Anmlller
8. T. Stephoneon...
AXSUAL mcfOKTS.
The annual reports and certificate
have been received since the ltith
day of June, aa follow:
Durnside township received judo zi.
Pike Independent " " 21.
Bloom township " 21.
Huston " " " 21.
Beccaria ' " " 22.
Cloarfield borough " 24.
Boggs township " " 24.
Hock ton Independent " " 25.
Bradford Independent " " 27.
Graham township 27.
Covington " " " 27.
Knox . " " " 2fl.
Greenwood" " " 30.
Morri " " " 30.
Nowburg borough " " 30.
Piko township " July 5.
Sandy " " " 5.
The above School Board have or
ganized for the current year a follow :
Burnside President, Jacob McKoe,
Grant ; Socrolary, Jamoa C. Owons,
New Washington.
Piko Independent President, Wm.
Cleaver, Curwensville ; Secretary,". U.
Spencer, Curwensvills.
Bloom President, Isaao Thomaa,
Forest ; Secretary, Frank McBrlde,
Forest
Huston President, George K. Will
iams. Ponfiold ; Secretary, Amos Horn
ing, Penfiold.
Iteccaria President, Thomas Flick,
I'tahville ; Secretary, Reuben Rex,
Glen Hope.
Clearfield President, O. L. Reed,
Clearfield ; Secretary, Wm. R. Brown,
Clearfield. (Uied since organisation oi
the Bonrd).
Unggs President, Barton Merntt,
Clearfield Bridge ; Secretary, James
Jloaso, West JJocatur.
Kockton Independent K. r. Peo
ple, Rock ton Secretary, Peter Beer,
Kockton.
Bradford Independent President,
Isaao Barger, Woodland ; Socrolary,
Isaac W ilson, Woodland.
Graham Prendent Philip Sbimel,
Wallaceton ; Secretary, B. 1). Hchoon.
over, Urabamton.
Covintrtoti Proaideot. Kmu Mignot,
Frenchville ; Seoretary, K. L. Coolriet,
Frenchville.
K nox President, Samuel C. Snyder,
New Millport; Hocrotary, Jared A.
Uloom, INew Millport.
Greenwood President, James Bto-
venaon, Hower j oecreury, at. rv .
Johnson, Bower.
Morris .Proaideni, reier aioyer,
Kylorlown j SocreUiy, lr. Al Thorb,
Kylertnwn.
Newbnrg President. K. HildebraDd,
llurd; Secretary, Gilbert 8. Tor.er,
Uurd.
Piks Preeidant, Joseph L. Dale,
Curwensville; Secretary, il oh neon Ii ol
den, Curwensville.
Sandy President, A. Uaborling,
Jefferson Line ; Secretary, K. C. Wash
burn, Babula.