Clearfield Republican. (Clearfield, Pa.) 1851-1937, December 24, 1879, Image 1

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' CLEARFIELD REPUBLICAN,'
CLEARFIELD, rA.
BITABLIHHBD IN lT.
Tin Urgeet t'lrealaUoa eranjr Mewapaper
la North Central Pannaylratua.
Termi of Subscription.
tr paid i advenee, or within t moetbj....t (Ml
If paid after I end before I Booth t BO
If paid after l!io eiplralloa of t moutbe... OO
Bates ot Advertising,
Traueioat edvertlaemeaU, pet aqoare of to llneeor
Iobb, s limee or .............
For oeeh enbeeqneat laeortioB.............
Adiaiatetrelora' Bad Eieeatora'aotieee. I
Audltore' Botieea - ........... S
Oantloneaad Betraye............. ... 1
Diaeolattoa aotieee S
Profeeotooal Cerde, i How ot Un,l yew....
I miI Balleee. Mr HBO ...
YEARLY ADVERTISEMENTS.
I equate ...IS t I eolotna. 5t
I irfaoroiM. I to I I eolnmB.. ......... To
I aquaree... ...It 1 eoloma.. IS'
0. B. I100DLANDER,
Publiaher.
Cards.
1 OR PBIHTI1IO OF EVERT DE8CE.IP
tloa eaatly eloeated at tble etjoe.
JJ W. SMITH,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
tl:l:Tl
riaarflald. Pa.
T J. LINGLE,
il'TORKEY-il - LAW,
1:11 Pbltlpabarg, Contra Ca Pa. yrpd
JOLAKD D. SWOOPE,
ATTORNKT AT LAW,
Curwenavillo, Ckertold ooanty, Pa.
eeuS, 78-If.
QSCAR MITCHELL,
ATTOHKEY AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA
aVOflliio la tbe Opera Honae. oelv, '7t-tf.
R. W. BAKUETf,
Attorney and Counselor! at Law,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
January St, 1879.
JSRAEL TEST,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Clearfield, Pa.
VODlea la the Court Hoaee. iyll,'T
HENRY BRETH,
(oarrea r. o.)
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE
rot BKLL TOWHIK1I.
Mhj , 1878.17
M. M. McCDLLOUOH,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
OA la llaeonie building, Second afreet, op-
poaile tfaa Court llouee. Jeze, to-ii.
Ay C. ARNOLD,
LAW k COLLECTION OFFICE,
CURWENCVILLE,
I Cleerlleld County, Panne, toy
So
T. BROCK BANK,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
Offioe In Opera Iloota. ap JJTMy
JAMES MITCHELL,
BBALBB IV
Square Timber & Timber Lands,
Jall'tJ CLEARFIELD, PA.
J F. SNYDER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
Offlee lo Pio'a Opera liouee.
done M, Islf.
WILLIAM a. wtiuri
a tear p. wallacb.
datib l. aaaaa.
joss w. waieLar.
WALLACE & KREBS,
(Euleoaaoro to Wallaee A Fielding,)
ATTORNE Y8-AT-LAW,
Janl'TT Cleerlleld, Pa.
Fruk FI.IJ..J.. W. D. Biglev..... V. Wllm.
YIELDING, BIGLfiR A WILSON,
ATTORNEYS -AT - LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
oT-Offloe la Ple'a Opera Ilee.e. taob-7.
FI
ARRY SNYDER,
BARBER AND HAIRDRESSER.
Shop oa Market St., oppoalto Court Hoaee.
A oteea vawoi lor every ouaaeaner.
Aleo dealer la
neat Brando of Tobacco) and C'f are,
CUarSold. Pa. aaae II. Tt.
TBOB. a. SUBBA.
nana aoaae.
jyjURRAY & GORDON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, FA.
aT-OBee tat Plo'i Opera Hoaee, eeeoed tear.
Jo'ie
marl a. a bballt.
SABIBI, W. II'COUT.
TITcEXALLY A McCURDY
ATTORN EYS-AT-LAW,
Hearflell, Pa.
jBMF" Legal baalaeaa attended to promptly witnj
Ideltty. OBee oa Seeond atreet, above tee Flrat
National Hant. jaa:l:ia
A
G. KilAMER,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Real Eatalo aad Cwlleetioa Agent,
CLkARI'IKLI, PA.,
Will prompt!; atlead to all legal kallaeee ea
treated to bia eare.
jmOMm la Plo'e Opera Hoaaa. Jaal'Ie.
J F. McKENRICR,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
AD legal bailaeea totroated to ble oaro will ro-
eetre prunpt atteattea.
OIBoe eppoalu Coart Hee.e, la Maeoale Bulldiag,
eeeedSoor. augl4,'7s-lj.
D
R. E. M. 8CHEURER,
HOaKSOPATHIO PHYSICIAN,
Omee la reafdaaeo oa Flrat ft.
April 14, 1871. Clearleld, Pa.
T"R. W. A. MEAN8,
PHYSICIAN A 8URGEON,
DUBOIS CITY, PA.
Wlllatteai profeaeloael ealla promptly, aagll'll
jyn. T. J. BOTER,
fUYSIClAN ANDSUROION,
Ofloe oa Varket Street, CWeraelA, Pa.
AVtr-Omea bearat 8 U II a. ., aad I to I p.
D
R. 3. KAY WRIGLKY,
BOMCKPATBIO PHYSICIAN,
ay0(lf aajolalng Ibe rertdeaoo of Jamm
Wrigley, Kao,., ea Ibeoad St., Olearteld, Pa.
Jl;ll,'; tf.
M. II ILLS,
'OPERATIVE OK.WTHT,
CLEARFIELD, PENN'A.
eyft(loa la realdeaeo, eppeelle Sbaw llooao.
Jy,I87t if
D
R. H. B. TAN YAL3ABT,
CLEAR PI ELD, PENN'A.
OFFICE IN HER1DKNCE, CORNER OF FIRST
AND FINE STREETS.
p- OBee boen-rroai It to 1 P. M.
May It, 1871.
D
R. . T. BURCHFIELD,
Late Serf eea ef ibe 884 lUglBMmt.PeaiBaylvaBm
Vol teeaa, bavtafl rotaraoA f rem Ibe Army,
ofere ble prefeeawiaa eerrteee to eboarUaame
afOtoarloldaemaey. .
ael rmtaaoteaal eaUe praaptry ailoadiloe,
Omeo aa leeead atreee. (ereaertyeoaaplad by
Or.Woe4o. aaee,'M K
CLEARFIELD
GEO. B. GOODLANDEB, Editor
VOL. 53-WHOLE NO.
TVHTICBH' at CONHTABLEm' PEES
We haea printed a large aauber of taa new
FEE BILL, and will aa tba reeeipt of twenty
tee oenta. mall e enny to any aridrea.. mvtl
WILLIAM M. HKNKY, Juhtice
0 TR PlACB AMD BdUTMeSB, Lt'MBIR
CITY. UulleietioDi mad md mwy promptly
paid Tr. ArlklM of frMaiant and dtwtla of
tontayaaoa Batlr UM.U. aati warraaled or
rwel or ae bare. 4jy'7i
JOHN D. THOMPSON,
Juatloo of the Peaoa and Scrlraner,
Curwenarllla, Fa.
taColleelioai aiada and money promptly
peldorer. febtl'Tllf
JAS. B. GRAHAM,
dealer la
Eeal Estate, Square Timber, Boards,
SHINGLES, LATH, A PICKETS,
tilO'71 Clearleld, Pa,
REUBEN HACKMAN,
House and Sign Painter and Paper
Manger,
Cleat Held, Penn'a.
m-WIll exeeate Job. In bia line promptly end
la a workmanlike manner. ay r4,67
JOHN A. STADLER,
BAKER, Market St.. Clearleld, Pa.
Freab Bread, Raak, Nolle, Plel end Cakea
on hand or made to order. A general aaeortmeat
of Confeetloneriea, Fraita aad Note la etoek.
loo Cream and Oyetere la eeaaoa. Salooa aearly
oppneite the Poetofneo. Prioeo moderate.
M.rrk ta-'tt.
WEAVER. & BETTS,
DBALBBB I
Real Esta'e, Square Timber, Saw Legs,
AND LUMBER OF ALL KINDS.
0-OOtee OB Beetrnd etreot, la rear of etore
room of Ueorge Wearer A Co. Jen. "7- If.
RICHARD HUGHES,
JUSTICE OF TUB PEACE
FOB
lircalur Totttuhlp,
Oaeeola Mllla P. 0.
All ofleial bualneal antraated to him will be
promptly attended to. mob29, '7t.
JAMES H. TURNER,
JI PTICEOP THE PKACK,
Wallaceton. Pa.
pm-H dm prfpard binMlf Hh alt the
Bwu.17 blaok fiiruti aadr tba Pen-ioa and
Boooty iawi, aa well af bitak UhIi, (. AH
legal maturs ntrmtad to hi. aara will rira
prompt atttDtioa. May Tth. 1ST --if.
JOHN L. CUTTLE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
ud Baal EaUte Affut, Cleirfleld, Pa.
OBflf a Third itret, bt. Charry A Wain it.
-Rtntfolly offari bit larrlaai lo lUng
ud buyiag lMd la OUarfiald and adjotni&g
aoaatlai aod wlthaa aspariaaaaaf avartwcDty
ytan M a nrrayar, lattara aimiflf tbal ha taa
nnatr taitiiaaiioB. in.
A1SPKKW I1ARWICK.
Market Ktreet. Clearfleld, Pa.,
AtDrACTaaaa aud paAtvaa im
Harnett, Bridtet, Saddles, Collars, and
Horse-furnishing (foods.
T-AII kiadt of repairing promptly attended
to. Bad J Ian' IJardwaro. rlorta Braihea, Carry
Oomba, Ao., alwayt oa bond and for aala at the
lowaat oaab pnea. aiaroa i, ior.
G. H. HALL,
RACTICAL PUMP MAKER,
NEAR CLEARFIELD, PENN'A.
aaVPempa alwayt an hand and made ta order
en abort aotloo. rtpee oorea ob reaeonaDie tereaa.
All work warreBted to render latlalaetioa, an
dolleored Ifdeaired. mytt:lypd
lilvery Stable.
TUB andoralgaed bega leaea to laioraa th.peb
lle that be la aow felly prepare1 to aeeomma-
date all la the way of faraiahing (U.eea, Beggiea,
deddlee aod Harneee, ea tba aaorlort aotiee ana
aa reaeeneble torma. Reaideaoe oa Loeait atreet,
eetweea Third aat Foorth.
UEO. W. OEARHART.
'nearteld, Feb. 4, 1174.
WASHINGTON HOUSE,
SLUM HOPE, PENN'A.
rTtllE aaderelcned. bovine: waaed"'thie 'aoa
X modinao ll.,talr la tbe village of (lien Hope,
ia aow prepared to aeeommodata all who may
aell. My table aad bar aball be .applied with
tbo beat tbe merkot avnrde.
UHOH.lB W. DOTT8, Jr.
OIob Hope, Pa., Mareh it, ISit.tf.
THOMAS H. FORCEE,
BBALBt IB
GENERAL MEKCHANDI8E,
CRAIIANTH, Pa.
Alao, eiteativa maaafaetaror aad deakr ta Eoaare
Timber aad Bawea Lamberol all tlBda.
4r-Ordere eolielted aad all bllle promptly
Hied. Iyia7l
E. A, BIGLER & CO.,
aaaLaaa ir
SQUARE TIMBER,
aad aiaaoftwtarert of
A LI. KINUtl OPKAWEO LUMBER,
I-T7I CLEA.RFIKLD, PENN'A.
8. I. SNYDER,
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
ia aaAiaia m
Watchoa, Clocks and Jewelry
Ormlmm't Row, MmrkH Stri,
(LbARKIKin, PA.
AM kinda of rwpairing la aiy line nrvMptty at
ended to.
April 2( lata
Clearfield Nursery.
EN'COURAGE HOME INDUSTRY.
THE vaderelnod, baelag aetabliabod a Nor
eery oa tbe 'Pike, abeot half way between
Clearteld aad CarwenaTtlle, ie prepared to far
alak all kiada of FRUIT TREES, (ataaaaH aad
dwarf,) Evergreeaa, fihrabbery. Grape Viaoe,
leoeeoberry, LawtoB Blaokbarry, Htrawberry,
aad Reapberry Viaea. Alao, aiberiaa Crab Treoe,
Uaiaao, aod eerly eearlet Rbabarb, Ao. Ordere
promptly atleaded to. Addroee,
J. u. w KHIHT,
eepll (S.p , 0,weeilla, Pa.
MEAT MARKET. 4
F. M. CARDON & BRO.,
Oa Market It, aaa dear watt ef Maaaloa Fleaae,
CLEARFIELD, PA.
Oar arraacemeata ara rf tba eaoet eomplet.
bararear tor feraiabiag the pablio with Freak
meat, or ail lied, and or taa very neat oaaiity.
We alee deel ia all klade of Agrlealural lraple-
meata, wkleb we keep ea eihlbitiea for the bea-
ott ef the eeblio. Cell arnaad when la Iowa,
aad take a mob at thing., or eddme aa
r. U. CAB DOB Bnu.
Clearteld. Pa., Jely 14, llft-tf.
1rarHeM Inturattct 1trttry.
cabbolib. aiaata.
A ERR BIODLE, wfrm".
Rapreeeat tho fnllowtng aad ether trfftUaa C't
Oomnaniee. Aaaata.
Llnrpeet LeadeB A alnbe-0. Br.44.inl.et
LTOnarag ea mete. I A oeab plana.... t,tee ,tnt
Phereia, ef Hertford, Coaa I.tll eJ
leaereaoe Co. ef North Aaerli t.4.1l.t74
Nenb (rllitb A Mereoatlle V I. Rr I.7H.MJ
Heelilek Cemmereiel-U. I. Breech.... 47,Ut
"etoreewa ttl.lll
Traeetora (LUb A Aoeldeat).... 4,i.1M
OBeo ea aveebot St- aaa. Caart Heaao. Cleat-
ield, Pa. Jaae A, TMf.
& Proprietor.
2,652.
For Ibt OLRAtriBLD RapcaLid-AR.
1HB APPROACH OF WIN1F.R.
Old WlDlcrhiteome with hiweold,)iillla breath,
And tba vardara all fall from tba trtat i
AH Nat ura iwoi touohad with tba ftnsar of daath,
Aad tba fftraatat ara aeginatnc ta rroaa.
Wkta tba waatoa young ladt a'ar tba river do
ltd,
And Klo-a attaodi hi aa mort:
WhiU you art an joying a good Itraiida.
Than yoa ought to roaoaibor th poor.
Whta tba oold-ftatbared mow doth to pUaty
ejoaooau
Ami wbiUna tba proptet aroaorl i
When tbo hoon-fluttiog wind from t ha North hall
attend.
Uard ohiliinr and fraeilnc the sroand t
When tbo billi and tho dalaa ara all oorarad with
whitt.
And tba North wind around yoa doth blow.
And a bright twinkling tur ahull proclaim a cold
ngot.
Tata 70a aboald ramtiober the poor.
(Than th poor, harm lata hart lhall be traced to
tba wnod
Itf bar fnoUtepa indented la mow :
When your lipi aod your flngera are ittrted with
blood,
Aad tba fcatkimcn a t atno-thootinv ioi
When tba poor Robin Hedbrcaat appraaobea roar
001,
And tba lololea hong at your door ;
While your bowl antokae with aonatbing reviving
and hot.
That'a tba time to remember the poor.
Soon a thaw w 111 eneot and the water inoraait.
And the riven vehemently flow;
The fl ah from their prtaoai will gain a ralaaae.
And in danger tbo travelers go (
W ban tba nelda ara o'6owa by the proad twell -log
flood,
And tba bridge ara aecfal no mora :
While In health you aojoy everything that it
good
Sure, you ought to remember tbt poor.
NO At
Soon a day will appear when a Saviour wat bora-
All .Nation ihall join to one volae:
The whole World .bill anita to talnte the tweet
worn
All tba eodt af tbt earth aha 1 1 rejoice
Whan gnm Death la deprived of ile all-killiog;
til. ir,
And the tirava U triumphant no more,
Sainta, aogeli aid men ba lelijab aha'l tin,
And tbo rioh aball lie down with tbe poor.
A COAL OIL HO K 110 11.
Klmira, New York, was the scene of
the lamp horror. Tbe Gazette of that
pluco gives tho detuils as follows :
It occurred on December 9th, at tho
house of John lianclall, No. 927 Col
lege Hill. About 11 o'clock at niht
Mr. Kanuall retired to bed up atuirs,
and Mrs. Kandull, his wifo, was get
ting ready to follow him. .She went
into the dining-room to extinguish the
kerosene lamp which stood on the
mantle -piece. In tbe room at tbo time
was her mother, a venerable lady
eighty-eight years of ago. As Airs.
Kandull was in tho act ot turning
down the lamp it suddenly exploded
with a report which sounded like that
of a cannon, lo tbe startled ears of the
affrighted women. In tho twinkle of
an eye the youngor Airs. Kandall was
enveloped in flames, the burning oil
boing thrown all over her clothing,
setting tbom on lire in an instant,
while pieces of the broken glass of tbe
lamp were burled all over tbe room
Tbe agonizing shrieks of tho burning
woman, mingled witb tna piercing
screams oi ner anngniea mninor,
brought Mr. Kandall. intensely alarm.
ed, down stairs, whore be was horrified
to sco bis wife one mass of nam,
while tho other lady In ai was seek
ing to extinguish tho fiercely burning
clothes of her doomc' and unfortunate
daughter. At tb't time tho carpet,
saturated with oil, was on fire, and
altogether ibe scene was one to appall
and paralyze tho stoutest heart.
BURNED TO A CRISP.
Mr. Randall hastened for bed quilts
and other clothing, which as soon as
possible were thrown over bis sn tier
ing wife, and thereby the flames were
finally smothered, but not before the
the clothing was entirely burned from
ber body and she lay a blackened,
blistered tbing, insensible on tbe floor.
In trying to aave bis wile Mr. .Randall
was terribly burned. Both hands were
almost charred to the bones, and In
"stamping" out the fire, raging in the
carpet, wbicb tbroatoned to destroy
tbo house, bis leet were to badly blis
tered tbat ho could not allerwarde
stand on them. Tne elder Mrs. Kan
dull was also terribly burned about
tho hands while trying to save her
dnughter. The fingers of one hand
are so badly blistered tbat it is proba
ble the ends will slongh off. Very
soon after tho terrible incidents rela
ted, Mr. Kenben Kandall, a son of tbe
injured ones, reached tho house, and
when apprised of the awful nature of
tba event was almost overcome with
anguish. As soon as possible ilr. A.
3. Kcllcn, who lives next door, was
called np by young Kandall, and going
to tbe house rendered what temporary
assistance was possible. When he got
there he found on the stoop burning
carpet saturated with oil, wbicb bad
been torn np and thrown out.
DEATH OF MRS. RANDALL.
On entering ho saw Mrs. Randall
lying on tbe floor, presenting a shock
ing sight, the flesh blackened and burn
ed to a crisp in places, and other parts
of the body raw and twolen from the
fierce and cruel flames. Dr. Wm. C.
Way was at once summoned to attend
(he sufferers, and quickly responded.
They were made aa comlortablo as
possible, their sufferings being relieved
lb narcotio remedies. Hut little
hops was expressed for tho recovery
of the younger Mrs. Kandall, and af
ter lingering in terrible agony, sho died
about 1 1 o'clock next day, twelve hours
alter receiving her dreadful injuries.
Owing to tbe shock to the system at
ber advanced age, combined wub ber
injuries, It It also leared tbat tbe older
Mrs. Kandall cannot live, Mr. Kan-
dall's injuries are not regarded as lia
ble to result fatally, although be is
badly oft. Mr. Kandall, whose house
hold hat thus been ruthlessly ravaged,
has been a resident of Klmira lor fif
teen years or more. He is a machinist
and well off. His wife was o lady
about filly-five years of age.
ANOTHER ACCOUNT OF TBE HORRIBLE AC
CIDENT.
Tho Free Preu says that when the
physician arrived be found Mrs. Ran
dall lying on the floor insensible. Upon
attempting to feel the pulse bo discov
ered that bor hands and wrist were
burned to a crisp, to horribly in fact
that the flesh gave way as he pressed
his finger on the forearm, lie was
compelled to ascertain hor vital condi
tion by consulting the carotid artery.
The removal of what was loft of Mm.
Randall's outward garments, wot at
tended with a most terrible experi
perience, the flesh In almost every part
peolingoff with the clotbet. It was A
most beart-i ending sight to the bus
band, himself terribly onrnod, but who
in his extreme anxiety for his wife, ap
peared to lorget bit own it.jurioa, and
remained by ber aide to do all tbat
wat In hit power lor her.
a Hoaaiaia tioBT.
In tbt meantime neighbors, bearing
of tbe oiooident, cam a with kindly
heart to render all the aeMttanre In
their power, bat at they stepped
aorott tbe threshold, and gaaed upon
the Inanimate form of Mrs, Ratvdall.
CLEARFIELD, PA., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1879.
the stoutost heart quailod at tbo hor
rible sight that was revealed. They
looked down upon face disfigured
almost beyond recognition ; upon blis
tered and blackened limbs; tresses
curled and crimped by the cruel flames,
and last, but not least, upon tho agon
ized countcnanco ol tbe sunering Hus
band or tbo woman whose mo was
fast ebbing away. Many turned back
with sickening hearts, unable- to do
anything, but enough remained to
render all tho assistance required.
A UEB01C HUSBAND.
After doing all that was possible for
Mrs. Kandall, the physician turned his
attention to bor busband and discov
ered that ho too had received terrible
injuries, ilia hands and feet were
burned to blisters, absolutely raw in
many places, and yet be did not oorrf-
plain nor utter one wordoi agony save
on account of his wife. When at last
his own condition was examined by
tbe doctor, and its pitilul nature dis
covered, he reluotanlly submitted to
the physician t attention. Soothing
remedies wore applied, and great band
agoa placed upon bis bands and leet,
and tbe doctor ordered perlcct rest.
lis insisted, however, upon being
placed on tbo bed by tho side ot his
wife and his request was grante. Those
who watched the sufferers during the
night say that whenever a groan os-
capod Irom Mrs. Kandall s lips ber hus
band would turn, and, with his blis
tered and bandaged bands, would
ondeavor to extend relief. Of course
be could do nothing, as the suffering
woman a condition did not allow ot tbe
simple touch of tbe hand.
WHAT TO DO IN CERTAIN
CASKS, AND HO IV TO DO IT,
1. Child two years old has an at
tack of croup at night. Doctor at a
distance. What is to be done?
Tbe child should be immediately un
dressed, and put in a warm batb. Then
give an emetic, composed of one part
of antimony wine to two of ipecac.
Tho dose Is a tcaspoonful. If the an
timony is not at band use warm wa
ter, or any other simple emetic; dry
tho child, and wrap it carefully in a
warm blanket.
2. Hired girl sprained her knee vio
lently. First batho In warm water, then
put the while of an egg In a saucer,
stir with a pieco ot alum tbe size of a
walnut until it is in a thick jelly j place
a portion of it on a pioce of lint or tow
large enough to covor the sprain,
changing it as often as it seems warm
or dry; the limb is to be kept in a
horizontal position by placing in on
a chair.
3. Bees swarm, and tho man who
hives them gota severely stung in the
face.
Tbe sting of a bee it hollow and
barbed, and as it contains poison, the
first thing to be done it to remove iu
Tba part stung should then hn bathed
in warm watt;, a"d a little ammonia
be rnhlel in it.
4. Some one's nose bleeds, and con-
not be stopped.
Take a plug ol lint, moisten, dip in
equal part of powdered alum and gum
arabic; and insert in tbonoee. Bathe
tho forehoad in cold water.
5. The child cats a piece of bread
on which arsenia has been placed for
killing rats.
Give plenty of warm water, new
milk in large quantities, gruel, linsoed
tea, foment the bowels. Scrape iron
rust off anything, mix with warm wa
ter, and give in largo draughts fre
quently. Never give largo draught
ol fluid until tboso given before have
been vomited, because tbe stomacb
ill not conliact properly if filled, and
tbe objoct is to got rid of the poison as
quickly as possible.
u. ioung lady sitt in draught, and
comes borne with a bad sore throat.
Wrap flannel around the throat,
keep out of draughts and sudden
changes of atmosphere, and every half
hour take a pinch ol cnlorale ol pot
ash, placo it on tho tongue and allow
it to dissolve in the moutb.
7. Nurso suffers from a whitlow on
her finger.
Dace tba whi'.low in water aa hot
aa can be borne, then poultice with
linsoed meal, taking care to mix a lit
tle greose within tbo poultice, to pre
vent it from growing hard. Bathe
and poultice morning and evening.
B. thud lulls backward against a
tub of boiling water, and is much
scalded.
Carefully undress the child, lay it
on a bed on its breast as tbe back it
scalded, be sure all draughts are ex
cluded, then dust over the parts scald
ed bi-carbonato of soda, lay muslin
over it, then make a tent, by placing
two boxes with a board over them in
the bed, to prevent tho covering from
pressing on the scald ; cover np warm.
9. Mower cuts driver t legs at ho it
thrown from the teat.
Put a tight bandage around the
limb, above the cut. tlip a cork nntler
it, in the direction of a finedrawn from
tbe inner part of the knee to a little
outside of the groin. Draw the edges
of tho cut together with sticking
plaster.
1(1. Child bas a Had ear-acbe.
Dip a plug of cotton wool in olive
oil, warm it and place it in the ear.
Wrap np the bead and keep out ol the
draught.
11. xoulb goes to skato, falls into
an air-hole; brought homo insensible.
Strip the body and rub it dry ; then
rub with a warm blanket and place in
a warm room. Cleanse away froth
and mucus from tbe nose and mouth.
Apply warm bottles, bricks, etc, to
tbe armpits, between the thighs and
the soles ot the feet Rub the surface
of tho body with the hand incased in
a warm, dry, worsted sock ; to restore
breathing, close the nostrils and breathe
steadily into the mouth; inflate the
lungs till the breast be raised a little,
then let the nostrilt Iree and prcst
gently on the breast until signs of life
ppear. 1 hen give a warm drink and
put to bed. Do not give up all hope
fur at least three hours after the ac
cident.
12. Child gets sand In bit eyes,
l'lace your forefinger on the cheek
bone, having the child before yoa ;
then draw op your finger and yon will
probably remove it ; but if you cannot
get at the sand in this way, repeat tho
operation while yoa have Knitting
needle laid against the eyelids; thit
ill turn the lid Inside out, and then
the sand may be removed with a tilk
handkerchief. Bathe In cold water
and exclude the light tor a day.
"I protest against my tentenco,"
said a tramp to Judgo Kla of Roches,
ter, N. II. "On what ground, air f"
" 'Cause I've been twice in jail, and am
opposed to a third term."
No Chinose bank hat failed for Ave
hundred yearn. Whon the last failure
took place the officer beads were cat
off and flung into a corner with the
other assets, .
PRINCIPLES, NOT MEN.
I10W WORLDS ARE HORN.
TUB SCIENCE OF ASTRONOMT AND THE
COMMON SENSE OF MANKIND.
Frof. Proctor delivoied the second
lecture of hit eourso recently in Lin
coin Hall, Washington, to largo and
doeply interested audience, it b
been announced tbat the subject would
be ' Other Worlds and Other buns.
But, through tome misunderstanding,
be bad prepared himself and brought
illustrations for a lecture on "The
Birth and Death of Worlds." After
brief apology for tbo mistake, he pro
ceeded with tbe latter, and remarked
tbat we find in ttndying tbo crust of
tbt earth, aad also in studying the
solar system, the clearest possible evi
donee, in the first place, that this
planet im whlth He livo has passed
through inimoj)" leriods of time, and,
in the secono , ' .'bat they are abort
compared witb the porioda through
wuicb tbe aolar system bas passed
According to estimates of scientists it
required at least lUO.UUU.UUO yoars to
form the strata, and 350,000,000 for
tbe earth to cool down Irom a great
molten mass until tbe suriace became
fit for living creatures to exist upon it.
That would give a period of 450,000
000 yoars to convert tbo earth from a
molten moss to its present condition.
But there was a previous state. We
have olear evidenco that the aolar sys
torn must have been originally in a va
porous condition. To convort tbe earth
from that to a molten mass must have
taken at least 60,000,000 years, giving
it a very moderate estimate 000,000,
000 years as ita duration. There is
but one way of getting over this con
elusion that all the evidenco upon
which it it based is deceptive ; that
tho earth never was a mass of vapor,
never was in a molten condition
nevor cooled slowly into a habitual
condition ; that the animals and plants
which seemed to have lived on its face,
as indicated by their fossil remains,
were formedin a single moment or a
single day in the strata, as thoy are
formed lor no other purpose tbat can
be imagined but simply to deceive
mankind. That is a view which can
not for a moment bo entertained. We
did not invent our own minds, and
whatever conclusions we arrive at by
the exercise of them we must regard
as fairly admissible. After all, it is only
because our minds are so limited tbal
the development of a planet or the ao
lar system seems so different from the
development of a troe or an animal.
We find all tbe mcmbora of tbe solar
Bystem traveling in the tame direction
round tho tun, and the groat mass ol
the sun itself traveling in the same
way. 1 bore are but two exceptions
to this rule the families of sattellitot
dependent upon Uranus and Neptune,
which seem to travel tho wrong direc
tion, but thoy are on tbo outskirts of
our solar system, it proves in toe
most incontestable manner tbal there
must have been aiven originally lo the
wuule solar syetem on. eoramon move
ment. The recognition of thia fact is
the source of the nebular theory, wbieb
ia that the whole ot our solar system
was originally a nebulous mass turn
ing round on a disk. Certain portions
of it were loll behind, not thrown off,
at large rings similar to those which
are seen round the planet Saturn.
Those broke into fragments, which
gradually collected into singlo masses,
and so the planets wore formed, tbe
outer orbs of tbe systems first. Thus
the process went on until tbe large
central mass which we call tbe sun,
was left, ' Sometimes it happened that
tbe process of collodion failed and the
fragments became scattered ; these are
the asteroids. This theory only ac
counts partially for the formation of
tbe planets. Day after day, year af
ter year, and oentury after century,
tboy are being added to by gathering
ing meteors. Wbca we combine these
two theories togolhor wo can under
stand wby it is that when wo look at
the heavens tome instinct tells us that
those stellar doptht wore once our
home.
At this point tbo lights were turned
down and tho lecturer proceeded to
illustrate by stereoscopic views tbe
birth and death of worlds. Tho first
views were photographs of immense
nebular massca observable in the heav
ens, which be regarded as tbe original
condition of the solar syslom. Tbo
next illustrations represented the plan
ets Jupiter and Saturn, which are in
the second or cooling stago. Then fol
lowed views of Venus and Mars, which
are surroundod by atmospheres liko
tbe earth, and present other familiar
features. Tho concluding viowo were
photographs of tbe moon, which is a
dead planet, being without an atmos
phere, without water or ony tign of
life tuch as wo are familiar with. In
conclusion be expressed tbo belief that
as there are lower orders of life, so
there are higher and higher orders in
finitely, and that although this uni
verse will at tome luture age dio, we
can escape the body ol thit death and
find diffused everywhere "harmony
unending. "
A MATTER OF CONSCIENCE.
Tbe Rev. Dr. Macleod, father of Dr.
Norman Macleod, passing through tho
crowd gathered beforo tho dour of a
now church he was about to open, was
stopped by an elderly gentleman with,
"Doctor, if yoa please, 1 wish to speak
to you." Being asked if bo could not
wait until alter worship, he replied
tbat it was a matter upon bis con
science "O, since it is a matter of
conscience, Duncan," said tho good
natured minister, "1 will hear what It
is."
"Well, Doctor," said Duncan, "the
matter ia this. Ye soo tho clock yon
der on the new church. Now there is
really no clock there, only the face of
one ; there is no truth there, only once
in twelve hours: and in mv mind that
Is wrong, very wrong, and quite
against tho conscience that there
should be a lie on tho face nf tho '
house of the Lord." Tho Doctor
promised to consider the matter.
"But," said ho, "I'm glad to see you
looking so well, man. You're not
young. I remembor yoa for many
years; but you have a fine head of
hair still." "Kb, Doctor," exclaimed
the unsuspecting Duncan, "now, yo're
joking ; it's long tince 1 bad my hair."
I'r. Jtlaclood looted shocked, and
answered In a tone of reproach : "O,
Duncan I Duncan I are yoa going into
th house of the Lord with a Vie on
your head?" Ile heard no more of
the lie on the face of the church.
Chambrrf Journal.
Advice to a young mother: Yoa
may safely commit tbe child' elothe
to the care of your servant, bit tbe
rest of tbe little one yot hail batter
take care of yooreelf.
No American ie ever guilty of meet
ing another wllheat taking : f Wall,
bow' trade?" Anal tt docaD t Better
II one of tbtm ie eaagmaa. .
REPUBLICAN.
LARGEST ORGAN JN TUB
. WORLD.
A DESCRIPTION OF AN INSTRUMENT TO
COST FOIITT THOUSAND DOLLARS.
The orgr.n for tho Cathodrul ill
Garden City, Long Island, now untie
construction by Mr. llilborne L. Koose
veil, is in several respects one of the
most remarkable In the world, it will
cost about $40,000, and will be put in
placo next Spring. The main body of
the instrument will stand In tbo Chan
eel, and the organist will tit there. At
tbo west end ot the building, In tbe
tower directly behind a largo stained
glass window, is a room in which part
oi the organ will be placed and con
nected with the chancel by electricity,
like tho organ built by Mr. Roosevelt
in urace Church. XHew lor. 'Abe
window will be oponed and closed by
electricity, controlled by tbo organist
Mom tbo chancel, thereby making fine
crescendo and diminuendo effects with
tho organ in the towor. Over the
ceiling, about the oenter of the build
ing, will be placed another part ol tbe
Instrument called tho echo organ
which is to be played from the chancel
by electricity. Underneath the chan
cel, iu the chapel situated there, is a
part ot the organ, wbicb it arranged
so that it can be played in tbe chapel
as well as Irom tbe chancel. Lastly,
tho large chimes which bang in the
towor will be connoeted with thochan-
col by electricity, to that tho organist
can play them Irom the key of the
organ, ibe bellows will be operated
by hydraulic engines, and the organist
can, by Bimpty turning on the water,
have the whole instrument, Including
tho chimes, at bis command. Though
this will be a mammoth instrument,
and nothwithstanding tbe great dis
lance between many ol us parts, tbe
pressure necessary to play on the keys
will be no greater than is used in play
ing upon a piano. This is due to the
use ot electricity, pneumatics, and hy
draulics, which combined render it
possible and practicable to construct
such an instrument.
Tboro will bo four vox humanas
(similar in construction to the celo-
brnted ono in rieiburg) ; ono of those
will be in tho chancel, one in the tower,
another over the ceiling, and tho fourth
one in the chapel beneath tho chancel.
All ot theso will bo under the control
of the organist in tbe chancel, and will
bo capable ot crescendo and diminuendo
otlocts. Uertainly some beautilul and
extraordinary combinations can be
produced with their aid. In all there
ill bo one bundrcd or ono hundred
and twenty speaking stops, the exact
number not yet having been delerm
inod upon, the Boston Music. Hall
organ has eighty four stops, the Cin
cinnati organ ninety six, and the larg
est organ in the world, that in Albert
Hall, London, ono hundred and eleven.
Five hydraulio engines will be needed.
Quite a small Gramme magneto ma
chine will furnish all tbe electricity
needed. Wboro mMihon,.) rrtrnn ,e
required, as In ringing bells or opening
indows, compressed air will be used
an Ingenious manner devised by
Mr. Roosevelt.
LEGAL TRAGEDY.
SHOULD A WIFE COMMIT PCRJGRT TO
IAVE HER HUSBAND?
In the llayden murder trial in Now
Haven tho other day, after Mrs. Hay-
don bad testified favorably to ber hus
band, the prisoner, the lollowing cross-
examination took place at tho hands
of the Commonwealth's counsel :
r. Waller Now, madame, you
have testified tbat the accused, who is
now on trial lor hit life, it your hus
band ?
Witness Yes, sir.
Mr. Wallor And you have told tho
jury that you were married some eight
years ago? '
Witness Yes, sir; between eight
and nine years.
Mr. Waller And you have told
them tbat you have horn him throe
children ? , .
Witness Y'os, sir.
By this time evory ono was on the
mi vive for something startling. Mr.
Waller was asking those questions in
a tone that betokoncd his earnestness
and that they were qucrios of impor
tance to tbo case of the State. Mrs.
Haydan began to pale. Counsel for
defence looked anxious, and the judges
stopped taking notes.
Mr. Waller You have told the
jury that your husband treated yon
anvctionatoiy r
Witness Yos, sir.
Mr. Waller And you still have as
much affection for bim and as much
confidonco in him as you ever bad t
Witness Yes, sir.
Mr. Waller And yoa believe that if
bo is punished lor the crime with
which he is charged, that an unjust
punishment will be inflicted upon bun ?
WitnesB Yes, sir, 1 do believe so,
so fur as I know.
Mr. Wallor Now, Mrs. llayden, I
don't want you to answer tho question
1 shall ask you yoa may not have to
answer it, and if the Court rule that
it i a proper question, you nocd not
answer it then. Give Ibe detence an
opportunity to objoct.
An oppresnive silence pervaded the
court room. Each person stretched
eagei ly forward to catch every sound
that fell from tho lips of tbo interloc
utor. A number of ladies wero sob
bing and tear drops glistening in the
eves of some of the sterner sex, while
tho (State's attorney was playing on
the heartstrings of tbe devoted wile.
Tbe clergyman fustenod hit eyes on
tho witness and seised firmly tho arms
of his chair. Mr. Waller gar.ed fixedly
at Mrs. llayden. ' Slowly he put the
rost of his question :
Aa Mr. lluydcn, the accused, it your
huband, the father of your throe chil
dren, a devoted husband to a loving
wile, and as yon have alwayt, and do
now, maintain tbe pleasantesl relations
with him, as yon have Implicit con
fidence in his innocence, as yoa believe
that il be suffers tbe ignominious
punishment that must beTell him in
case ho Is found guilty, win be unjust,
would you, madame, under such cir
cumstances, and under oath, make a
misstatement to save him, whom yon
love better than yonr life, from punish
ment ?
Tbe tceno was Intensely dramatic
Tbe witness gave way under the
strain and burst into tear. Krery
woman In the court room wept. . All
felt a sympathy for tho wooping wile.
There was a subdued hiss.
11 It' an insult to tbe witness," said
Mr. Watrous and Mr. Jones in tbe
same breath, adding : " Don't answer
tbo question."
Mr. Waller said: "I beard the
Counsel lor th defeec in an under
tone remark, 'It' an, insult to' tho
witness.' It I not an insult, Far be
it from mo to insult a loving wife and
a lady like th one now tin the witness
land. I would lay nothing to h-nrl
ber feeling! exoept what doty compels
NEW
me to say. It is no Insult to a devoted
wife to intimate that in order to save
tho life of hor husband she would, if
necessity compelled hor lo do to, per
jure borsch, it is rather an honor lo
hor. A woman wbo loves as she loves,
if she thought hor husband must suffer
an Ignomioious punishment, would ex
aggerate, provancale.and if necessary,
lull au absolute lulseuood to tave turn
nnd though sho would violate tho law
in so doing, 1 should honor ber lor It.
This is no Kutopia, and perfection has
not been and never will be reached. If
I were in a similar position to tbt ac
cused and my wile, mother of six
children whom kind Providence hat
seen fit to bloss ua with, were in the
place of tbe witness, and I though
she would not exaggerate and prevsrl
cato, and, it necessary, perjure herself
in order to save me, I would sot lovo
her with one-halt the love l now bear
her. My question wat put to show
those twelve trier that tho love ot tbe
wifo must make bor, if the be a true
wife, a prejudiced witness, and to show
them that when husband and wile are
truly ono she cannot be an unbiased
itness. Uur laws cannot compel
wile to testify against bor husband,
and tbit witness it now on tbe stand.
ut the requost ot hor husband, to tell
ber story and do what she can lo tave
him. It it her duty a glorious duty
and. although she mav not prevari
cate, i morely wish lo show tbe uourt
and jury why she should do to if
necessity roquircs. l do not wisb to
insult her."
Mr. Watrous replied that he knew
Mr. Waller did not intend to insult
the witness, but the question wat an
affront, and must necessarily bo. 11
asks ber if, believing certain tacts, tbe
would, while under oath, toll an un
truth. If the attorney lor tho State
can eliminate tbe atlront irom bit
question, bo will surpass in logic him
self in oratory. It cannot bo done,
and tbe affront stands. It it an
affront to ask one to lie when the
stands before the Court witb ber band
on the Word of God. no did not be
liovo tho witness would tell a lie,
wbethor under oath or not. He did
not beliove it was in the power of any-
thing, in love, or art, or anything this
side of heaven, where sho will corlainly
go, sooner or laior, to make ber lie, to
save her own or her husband's life. Ho
protested against such questions being
put to witnesses, and thought it out of
place, although it did give the attorney
fur tho Slate an oppirtunity to address
tho jury in bis persuasive manner and
enablo bim to pronounce a neavoniy
eulogy on wiloly devotion.
Juugo rark ruled that tbe question
was au improper one.
A BOARDING HOUSE JOKE.
REQUEST THAT WA COMPLIED WITH
THE TROUBLE THAT RESULTED.
From tbo Bridgeport (Coaa.) Farmer.
The other night a gentleman board
ar lua uuHM.Mu.i.b ..... .. m
tortably reading in bis room, the ooor
opened, when, from the loot of th
stairs, be beard a young lady boarder
with whom be was on terms ol I roe
and playful intimacy, call :
"Mr. B , tnrow mo your nigni-
gowo, please."
Sure ibat be must havo misunaer-
tood ber, called : ,
"lhtow yoa wbatr
"Your night gown, please."
He was startled. There was no mis
taking her meaning, and believing
that some new joke was on foot among
the second flooroccupante which would
seem to justify such a strange request
on the pari of the lady, he took a fresh
Ight shirt from bis bureau and tossed
it ovor the balusters. It was received
with an ejaculation which soundod like
(banks, and all wat quiet,
jiext morning, on descending, bo
iscovered bis property at the foot of
tbo stairs, wbere itseemod to be doing
duty aa an impromptu door mat. For
moment bu pronounced il very
shabby treatment ot tuch an immacu
late article by the fuir borrower, and
returned to bis room witb it ; but look
it place at the table in bit usual good
humor.
"Well, how did it work ?" he inquir
ed looking ovor expectantly at tbe
lady, oho bad omitted to give bim
cr usual cordial morning salutation,
and now her eyes were fixed upon her
plato and bor expression ot lace was
bul a shade lighter than a thunder
cloud.
Did the joko turn out a success he
pleasantly persisted.
I be lady bit her lip wilt) suppressed
angor, and bit fellow-boarders looked,
at bim in sober inquiry. Seeing there
was a mistako somewhere, be wisely
concluded to keep quiet and lot the
mystery explain itself. And it did.
That noqn he found upon hisdressing
lable the lollowing note :
Mr. , when next 1 ask yoa lo
throw me your knife down, or make
any request from you whatever yoa
will know it. 1 did not oxpect tuch
n insult from you sir. 1 behoved yoa
to bo a gonlleman. "
Calmly and in silence the gentleman
kto bit dinner, and on hit return to
business dropped a note in the Post-
olHue, of which the following it a oopy.
Alias , when next you ask me
lo throw my 'knife down,' or honor
me by any requost whatovcr, I trust 1
shall be so fortunate as to understand
you correctly, iou believed mo to be
irent oman and 1 know voa to bo a
lady. "
On hi return that evening sha went
to him In the hall with cordially out
stretched hands and frank words of
apology. A hearty laugh followed,
and each promised to keep "the joke"
a secret, and up to this writing each
ha faithfully kept tbe promise.
A Trim Appearance. No woman
can give a satisfactory excuse for per
sonal untidiness. Household work, of
whatever kind, doe not interfere with
having a clean drew on, however com
mon, a nice plain collar, and a smooth
head of bair, There is all the differ
enco In the world in different house
wives in this respect. Some always
look bright and "smart;" but other
never look decently clean in tbe morn
ing! Ihy seem to have no idea that
anybody ever notice their portonal
appearance while engage in thoir house
hold duties, or tbat it is a matter of
lb least possible concern to anybody.
They forget that Ihey have a husband,
who wot won when tboy war in fall
dree, and ttudied to attract him by
an addition il gave to their persons
without regard to the time and trouble
il required whose eye it as sharp now
a It ever was, and whose sensibilities
are just a acute. The children, too
especially th girls what a sad ex
ample to them i slovoollness on the
part of their mother I
There it a groat deal of unmapped
country within ut which would have
to be taken Into an account ia aa ex
planation ef oar fast and storm. .
TEEMS $2 per annoc. !a Advance,
SERIES - VOL; 20, NO. 50.
EDUCATIONAL.
bt m. i Mcquowit. .
BOVi AMD cinijt. "
i. , acBooi, aara.
. Silly lit Ilea ntebint ,
Coming tbrnagh the door,
Faabiog.eruwding. makiog .
A Iremendoae roar.
Vt'li, don't you ke-p quielf .
Can't yoa miad tbe rule J
Bteao mo, Ibia ia pleeaent.
Teubieg publio aohuoL
Slity Utile pilglrma
Oa tba road to fame,
If tbay Ml to reach II
Whowlllbetobleaer
High end lowly atatlona
fiirda of erery feather
Oa a eommoa level
Here are broaght together.
Dirty little faeee.
Loving little feeea,
(yea brim fell of miaebior,
Skilled la all ile arte.
Tbat'a a preoion. darling,
What are yoa abeal 7
May I paea the water 1
Fleaae may I go oat f
Boot, aod aboaa are abnffling,
tletea and beoka are rmltiiog.
And ia tbe ooraar yeader
Two paginate are battling.
Other! oattiog didoea,
What a bolberatioB I
No woadrr we grow eraaty
From aaoh eMoeietioo I
Don't fail to bear the Institute Lee
lure Course.
Brady township has thirty-five ar
tide in the Institute Fair. Brady
is aboaa.
Alex, lrvin. of Curwonsville. very
kindly sent 73 specimen of minerals
to tbe exposition. They are gem.
John Smith, Ksq., of Bloom town
ship, ha served sevsntoen years as
Secretary of tho Board of Directors of
that township.
In Union township tho parent of I
the caildren, and th Directors, visit
tho schools regular. This should be
imitated by all district.
J. F. McKcnrick has placed in tbe
institute fair aomo war relics, wbicd
are exceedingly interesting. Among
othors it a robel lestament, prlntod at
Atlanta, Ua.
A quarrel occurred not long since at
the llagorty' X Roads school, one
boy striking another with a hatchet
inflicting rather a serious wound. We
regrot vory much to bavo to record
this, from the fact tbat that school is
considered the best school in Beccana
township, in point of culture, morals
and scholarship.
Fow of the readers of tbe educa
tional column are aware that the oat-
side of tbe paper in which this appears
i printed nearly week previous to
tho issuing of th Republican. We
mention this in tbe way of an apology
for no Institute proceeding in this
day morning previous to tbe Institute,
and we can only say that when this
reaches tbe reader or this paper, tbe
Institute will be io lull blast, and if we
mistake not, it will be the best Insti
tute by far ever held in this county.
We will tell yoa all about it in the
next issue of the Republican.
ITEMS FROM LATE REPORT.
G. Curry, teacher of Hard school, in
Cbosl township, reports for th mouth
ending Nov. 4th, as follow: Whole
number enrolled, 32 ; average, 24 ;
Percent, of attendance, 92. Six per
sons visitod the school.
S. W. McLarren, teacher of Happy
Valley school, in Woodward township,
reports lorthe month ending Nov. 18th,
as follows: Whole number enrolled,
22 ; average attendance, 17 : percent.
of attendance, 85. Throe scholars
earns evory day, and five missed but one
day.
W. T. 8packman, tcachor of Psra-
diso school, in Lawrence township,
report for month ending Nov, 18th,
as follows : Whole number in attend
ance, 40 ; average, 29 ; percent, of at
tendance, 87. . riltccn missed no time.
Visit wore received from the County
Superintendent and ono citizen.
E. L. MoCloskey, teacher of Oak
Hill sohool, in Karthaa township, re
port for the month ending Doo. 4th,
a follows: Whole number of pupils
enrolled, 61 ; average attendance, 41 ;
foroent. ot attendance, 87 : f trcent.
of attendance during term, 91. Thir
teen pupils attended every day ol tbo
mouth.
J. Roll Bloom, tcachor of Evergreen
school, in Piks township, reports for
tho month ending Dec. 4th, aa follows :
Wholo number In attendance, Z9 :
average attendance, 21 ; Percent, of
attendance, 80. Eight pnpilsaltotided
every day of the month. Two missed
but ono day, A number ol visile were
received.
Zelrotta Bloom, leaober of Pino
Grove school, in Greenwood township,
reports for the month ending, Nov. ,
as lollowa : Ten pupils wero enrollod,
of whom ton attended every day ; two
bad no lardy marks, and three re
ceived but one. The percent, of at
tendance was 90. Two Directors and
several oitiaent visited the school.
W. S. (Jroor, toachor of Driftwood
school, reports for month ending Nov.
lHlh, oa lollow : Whole no rubor en
rolled during th month, 20 ; average
attendance, 15; percent, of attendance,
89. Seven pupil attended 22 dayt
each, and five were present every day
they belonged. On pupil fn spelling
766 word, missed 6 ; another oat ol
648, missed 6. . j ,
Lewi Brown, tsacber of Ml. Joy
school, in Lawrence township, reports
for the month ending Doc. 11th, as
lollnws: Whole number In attend
ance, 49 J average attendance, 40 ;
i'orcent. of attendance, 90, Seventeen
pupils attonded evory day ol th month;
1 1 visits, including ono Irom the County
Superintendent, wore received daring
the month. Tbe school is moving
long quite pleasantly.
E. C. Haley, teacher of Glen Hope
school, report for month ending Nov.
Huh, as lollnws : Whole number en
rolled, C8: Percent, oi attendance, 92.
Twenty-two pupilt attended every day
school was open, and 48 attended
evory day they belonged. The par-1
en I manifest t great interest in edu
cational work. A (ubseription wat
taktn up in lb tebool, and a large hell
purchased and placed on tbe school
boas.
J. A. Murray, teaohor of Trooldalo
school, in Boll towship, report for the
month ending Doc. 6th, a follow:
Whole number enrolled during month,
19 ; Percent, of attendance, 89. Nine
pupil attended every day In the
month, and three) attended vtry day
bul one. Tbe school ia getting along
splendidly, yet there is a seemingly
indifference on th part of the patrons
and Directors, from th fact that ibf
seldom It ever visit th school, r
- ACIMO WEATHB1.
' At last lb. aiaty 4y. give alaoa'
Ta Iboaa mora bee. aad giaaetae.
Tbat atlr tbe blood awl mead tba paaa
Aad eat tbe tbongbu a-aaaeiag.
Teath, healUa aad hope aad ooeiteaet
Areheepiog atop together,
- With barmoay af aool aad ee.ee,
Fet II la breeiof aeatbet.
Vleioaaef aaew forte, tketat aad alsdt
la boylab bralna are ranging,
f While Uahlleg droaau tbroagb girlish hoeda.
Like froot-worh aeeaae are obaegiaf .
From waltilag air. to rhvtbmte boat
Of boera eod belle together
la-door and oat, with ij ing feet
For it la braeing wealbat, ,.
Ia onnalry hvw.ye, trmargrowa,
A ehoerier life ie beetbog.
Wilbetirrup eape, aad a'eeda well blewa,
And daialy habile laotlieg,
lu a.i. ... aad .fa a4 bridle fee.
A Bi creaking kerneaa leather
Fla.h la tbe luntigbt, far and Bear,
, AUivart IbU bracing weather. r.
The bontemea take, the field to at art
Tba timid game a.eprtngief,
All eramping oaree of lite and art
Heeled him gayly tioglagi
White apeake kla gua aad aweepa kla alrlde
- la hruabwood, brake, aad bomber.
With health and etreagtb at happy tide,
For II ta braeiag weather.
To hrlp Ibe poor and wane la. eaid
!.et a. not bo forget fat, ....
Bat aeaaabilei with tree heaita aad sol.!,
And ne'er a fancy frttfol.
. lt'e live arid lot lire otertily,
Aad try lo pail logele
Wit heal a krone, for verily . .
'Tie Abo aad bracing weather.
. Havbas O. Ubsbb.
A BRITISH REPULSE. .
AFUBANS AND IKPOT FIOHTINO WITH
' DESPERATION.
1 ' London, Doo. 12. From dispatches
received bore from Cabul, dated yes
terday, it appear that vary serious
fighting ha again broken out in Af
ghanistan. It is staled lhat the com
bined movement of Gens. MacPheraon
and Massey against the Sepoys and
the more warlike of the hill tribe ha
miscarried in pretty much all its dc.
tails. The arrangement wo to com
bino the cavalry and artillery force
and make a joint assault by surprise on
tbe enomy, wbo wore strongly in
trenched in the mountain pas a fow
mile from Cabal. By some mischance
or misunderstanding the cavalry ar
rived at tbe point of junction too soon,
the infantry not having had aufflciont
time to com np. Tbo Afghan and
Sepoy forces descriod them and offered
battle immediately, and the force ot
horse artillery and three squadrons of
lancer encountered Mohammed Jans,
wbo was at the head of Ibe army 10,.
000 strong, consisting of tbe flower of
tbe hill tribes and thoir Sepoy allioa.
There wo no alternative, and the
British cavalry charged brilliantly, but
woro burled back by tbe enemy witb
slight loss. The attempt wat renewed,
bul witb little or no effect upon the
Afghans and Sepoys, who were massed
in their front and fought with a splen
did coolness and skill. Tbe British
wore finally repulsed, with tuch rapid
ity that they were obliged to leave be
hind them four guns, wbicb, however,
Ihoy had opportunity to tpike before
abandoning tbem. Io a subsequent
skirmish Gen. MacGregor succeeded
in recovering the guns, but was not
ablo to make thorn at once effective
against the enemy. Upon perceiving
the decided advantage they had gained
the Afghani pressed it and occupied
the Cabul gorge without opposition.
and were advancing directly upon the
capital. At Ibis point, they received
an unexpected check from the Seventy.
second regiment, which by ibis time
bad come up Irom Sbirpin and was
able to check theiradvar.ee. Moham
med then made a successful flank
movement for theground in the vicinity
of Baker's tomb, occupied it with diffi
culty, and is now in force on the
height south ol Balabisaar. In the
engagement twenty British soldier
were killed and seventy Ave wounded.
UinetL irge pop"uTtTo"oTil5TjSna
and Sepoys were armed with Snider
rifles, wbicb they used with the ease of '
veteran English troop. Th Sepoys,
in particular, lougbt admirably, and
although lb artillery of the British
ploughed their ranks, tbey never
flinched. A later dispatch stales tbat
Gen. MacPberson sought reprisal on
Thursday by attacking and severely
punishing a detachment ol the Sepoys,
but the final result ha not yet been
made known. Tb sitnation of the
British force is extremely ci itical, and
lively anxiety prevail her respecting
tbem.
London, Dee. 12. An official tele
gram from Simla confirm in every
particular the account already given in
these despatches of the battle between
the British and Afghan forces on tb
Ghuxnee road, txeept in tbe particular
lhat the Afghans attacked first and
were temporarily repulsed. The guns
taken by tbe Afghans were recovered
as stated in our former dispatch, but
the list of killed and wounded on th
British tide increase as the report
come in of different regiment and
battories engaged: The English loss
will certainly amount to fifty, and
probably more. The entire country is
stirred up by the nows of tho engage
ment, and it is feared by oommar.der
here that tbe most distressful and bit
ter Wintor campaign is threatening
ibe army, which is, under tbe circum
stances, in poor condition to dofend
itself. Tbe permanence of British rule
in Afghanistan soemi more problemat
ical than ever beforo.
London, Dec. 12. The rosult of
Gen. MacPherson's attack upon the
Sepoys is anxiously awaited. An un
expected combination among Iho bill
trine occasions groat consternation in
government and military circle bore.
Tho sun, tbat mantles the mountains
kissed by tbo clouds and the morning's
sun, and spcckless as the lily's inmost
leaf, is not more pure than a pur
woman.
Feelings come and go like light
troops following tbe victory ol the
present; but principles, like troop of
the line, are undisturbed and stand
last.
Kindness is stowed away in tba
heart likes rose leave in a drawer, to
sweeten every object aronnd them, and
to bring hope to the weary hearted.
Our striving against nature I like
holding a weather cock in one's hand ;
a toon as th force it taken off it veer
again with tbe wind.
The greatest evils of lile have bad
their ris from something which was
thought to be ol loo little importance
to be attended to.
Tears are to be looked at not a
proof of Tory deep sorrow, bit as a
graciooi relief to In killing intensity
of such sorrow.
Don't despise tbt small talent; they
are needed as wall a th great one.
A candle is sometime a useful a tb
sun.
A writer on school discipline say :
"Without liberal use of lb rod it 1
impossible to mak boy imart."
Good principle find birth and home
only in honest heart. Tbey grow
and flourish in no other toil.
The pride of Imaginary dignity may
help a man to strut, bat it give no
ton lo hi worth or esteem. .
It I always considered safer to
qnarrol witb temptation than to de
bate with prudence.
I W all have eor eeorat sins, and if
w know ourselves we should not judge
each other harshly.
. Knowledge without jaslic become
craft ; courage without reavto. become
rashness.