The globe. (Huntingdon, Pa.) 1856-1877, February 02, 1870, Image 1

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    FM
TERMS THE GLOBE
0
Pores:Rim edvisfk',
'Aix months
three months.....
ITHRIIS 'OP ADVERTISING
'I time. 2 do 3 do .lanouth
75' 1125 $1 50 $175
.—. 1 50 2 25 2 75 3 25
~... 2 25 325 400 475
.
•
3 months. 6 months. 1 Yiiir
One in .nr 00 $6 00 $lO 00
;Two inche s , ' " • 6. , 25' ' 900 15 00
;Tbrenpithes,.—....— 850 • • 12.00 20 00
,'Pour 10 75 16 00 25 00
'*Onarter oolumn,..— 13 00 18 00 30 00
kHalfooknusa,--... 20 00 30 00 45 00
one column, .............30 00 45 00.... ..... .80 00
Professional and Business Cards not exceeding six lines,
" $5 00
‘AsbninietritOrel and Executors' Notices, 6 1111.8, $2 60
Auditors' NOteCCS, 4 times 2 00
Or IRlser short Notices 1 50
Advertisements not 'marked With the number of inner.
'ens desired, 'will-be continued tliktorbid and charged to
rordingalsaliess terms. . •
rOr Special Notices, l 0 cents a line for single in.
eertin. 'By the year at a reducLd rate.
Ou • irices for the printing of Blanks, Handbills, ctn.
reasonably low. -
eineitroli, or lege
-2!Twoolnetes,
Three inches;.:...
ofesstonatiV gams g`ar.bs.
- -
1 Having A. B: BRUAIBAUGH 6IJ ,
permanently.locatedat, Dimling,ton, offal
professional services to the community.
01lice, the same an Ant jntely occupied by Dr. Linton
on 11111 street., - , aplo,l ?AG
DR: JOHN MOCULLOdHy offers his
firOftsilonal services to the citizens of Huntingdon
•end -vicinity; 'Office on Hill street, one door east of Heed's
Drug Store: ' ' 'Aug. 28, ,ss.
ALLISON MILLER )
PE Tr
b ias rpmpvcd r
B I it 1(0% opposite the Conrtj tiodei
ANIL 23, 1859.
J - E
N
DErini.. was,
; . 1 2 t m i c t e r _r ! nipyed n t to Leisteri
'July 317141 u
7;
W. 4OHNST9N,
Lt 1-11-6:Rscf: 'INSURANCE AGENT,
ziuNnsatom, 1,-A.
Office on Smith street
j A. POLLOCK,
. , ,
UR VEYOI? LC. REAL ESTATE AGENT
.• - •
ItUNTING DON, PA.
Will attend to Surveying in all Its branellea, nod will
buy and sell Real Estate, in any port Main Ualtol states.
'toad for circular. dec2o-ti
T ,
•
TTOILVEY, AT LATV,
. .
• . .HUNTINGDON, PA.
Oleo selll.l .1. PrAvi.!:Orsly.enr, I:eq. m 3111.610
J.
siLy`kNL7B BLAIR,:
• • , 11 1 .
P ATTORNEY AT •LA Tir,'
HUNTINGDON, PA,
Ornei',llllllll stiett, three'dctoiant id - Dula,: y5'69
J. USIA: • • rt.E.l:iu.
NIUSS.Ett W.,l'l_;tAintG; • ,
ATTO:RNEES-AT-LATV,
HUNTINGDON, I'A. ••
Oft/co tecogil floor of, Leistcr'o building; on 11111 bt!tyt.
Pehehnis uudyther claims prodiptly cplke!ed. .
E L.N. 'FOR tOLLECTING
bOLILIE BS' C . LADIS,IIOU:tTY, BACK PAY AND
All nho may have any claims . against the 0 neernmetat
fotlttnnsty, haat' ray aid lielisions,cau have their claims
pronisly collected hyuppt3 eitlicr itureuil ur by let
ter hi -'"'
W. 11. WOODS,
ATTOR AT L.I
llustmuutes . , r:\
f 1
arm
K _ALLEN LOVELL,
AT . .776t.6TEY LA TV,
rt : • " Pk
SpriclaLettoptlon given to Collectionp of nil kinds; to
the autttement ut•Estatek, &c 4 and all other legal bus!.
urea prosscntoilaith hdeliq and dlvpatch. jan.1.115b7
J 01.13 SCOTT, ci 11111351. i. IiTtORT, ; JOIN M. uku.s.r
v.L
• k •
gibe namo fkrm hfp been (thaw,.
frOni SCOTT & 1 . 11t0WN; to ' •
SCOTT, BiLOWIT. & ( BA./:ILEY,
Mee whleh' amnia they elll narrater ouuthiet their
piactioa s•
.ATTQR.2I7#T3 .. 2 1T,LA
zzikioi4, and allebilme orzolillaa s end roldiere heirs
against the Uorernment, will be promptly prosecuted.
m f ,o7,lsdk-tr.,, ,
_ 4 &
"77:
icar., Lytle Milton S. Lytle,
• • • 'ATTORNEYS : AT - LAW,
• : . HUNTINGDON, PA.,
Hare' 'Dinned a partnership under the name and firm
or
P. M. & M. S. - LYTLE,
And bare removed to We office on the aouch side of
fillstreet, fourth door west of innith.•
• • '
They will attend promptly to all kinds of legal bnal
-11C33 entrusted to their Care. " • ap7.tf.
jO_ § 1 !-F1 AB,Ti ,•
MANUFACTURER OF AND DEALER IN
WILLOW AND SLEIGII BASKETS,
--• Oraß theta and descriptionel, • . -
! " s '•
- ALEXANDRIA ; 1111:kTINOLON CO., PA. r: --
Juno 9,1869-If
LOSSES PROMPTLY PAID
HUNTINGDON INSURANCE
G. B. ARIVIITAGE;
HUNTINGDON,' PA.
Represelat tho Mat reliable Companies la
the Colustr). Rates as low as Is eousisteat
with reliable Indemnity. sap "
e
PitPi PepreiOnted over $14,006,U
BARGAINS !;1' BARGAINS!
SELLING OFF AT COST
"
Are now disposing of their entire - stock_ of
Goods AT CO S T. Persona wishing
DRY GOODS,
PlloPYTYst,
QUEENSWARB,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
RATS AND CM'S,
yaq, ETC., :ETC.,
Will save money by calling on us, as we
re determined to close out our entire stook
without reserve
REMEMBER THE K., ACE;
Smith's new building, Ilia Street, Ilqnt
, 7-5; (7 ';
ngderf, 1- PE: ^ 00t12
I - HUNTINGDON LIVERY STABLE.
undersigned, baying purchased the Livery Stable
recently owned by Mr.• Simon Weston, , .Se now pre
pared to aocommmiate the ;italic with :Emu mud.
ages en reasonable terms.
Stable at the neer et the Jackson goose, near the B.Z.
aug2.6419 L..I.MEERTSEE h MASON.
READY, -RECKONER -„- •
-A cOMplete Pocket' NOady Ifeetioner, In dollars
and oenta, to which are added forms of Netco, Blpd, No
govt., Petitions, &c., together with r Bet of noaful - Wdea
containing rata of interest from one dollar to twelve thous..
and, by th`Angle day, with a table of wageo, and bocrd
byAhe woot and day. For sale at
1104.4"
MUM
COUNTRY DEALERS .- can
;( bny CLOTHING from me In Htintingdon it
" WHOLESALEea Aeap ea they ,can In the
ties, as I hero - 4 n'holemiln Here in Philadelphia.
.1&.Agg414;
42 CO
. 1 00
WILE: LEWIS, HUGH LINDSAY, Publishers
VOL, XXV,
IL 'O. SUMMERS
UNION STEAM BAKERY
Gandy . Manufactory,
HUNTINGDON, Pti.
undersigned have fitted up a
fiiot.rinse Etcant BAKERY at. the Castilian Barden
on Church strut, and me prepared to Banish nll kinds
of
BREAD, ROLLS, ,BISCUITS, PIES,
Plain and , Fancy CAI ES/ . &c , ' •
In large or small typo titiett,"at reasonable prices.
W 6 would call espeeiai Attention of country dealers to
OUR CANDY MANUFACTORY.
We manufacture all kinds of Fancy and Common :on
fectioneries. tqultt to ally that comes from the city, and
ore prepared to till large or small orders on short notice
and at cur NUM.
We also keep on hand a large and constant supply of
FRUITS AND NUTS,
whir:it : they will furnish at reasonable rates..
The proprietors !latter themselves that it needs but a
trill' to convince the most sceptical, and please the most
fastfdlous.
fapeztfully solicit a liberal chore of 'public' patro•
nage. mid shall endeavor to merit its continuance.
5e1,1860 SUMMERS & REILEY
•
Inyirto
HEAD QUARTERS
: , FOR
D. P■ CWIN
INFORMS THE PUBLIC
THAT HE HAS
SPLENDII STOOK of NEW GOODS
CAN'T-BE BEAT
CHEAPNESS AND QUALITY
COME AND SEE.
D. P. GWIN
lltintinplon, Oct. 4, MD.
MaLIC STCat
• ;.1-2441%-:"4-73;::-2'431.,.-..
1 . 777 Z; 3" : 4 , , 1
trie t ,.. c -is„,:„
~ . .-ft .
__e '94r-Avn 1 , 4-V: !
_.;;:„.___
11 tp -1
• lii•
~..a „., ' . t. „,... , -- f
fiz '
.
311. S. Gli-XLIELIMIVTIM,
Eneceseor to B. M. aItRENE2
DEALER IN . . •
STEINWAY & SON'S PIANOS,
And Mier Junkie,
MASON & HAMLIN CABINET ORGANS,
Mel. &one, Guitare,Tiolins, Fifes, Flutes, Aecordeons,
Le.. &c.
Jlr - Piartos, Olgane, and Melodeons Warranted for flee
years. ••
Cireul ars - sent - on application.
Address N. J. OBEENE,
Huntingdon, Pa.,
241 floor I:oister's New Building.-
jau27,69
HUNTINGDON: FOUNDRY.
EASTON BLAKE. M. MARION McNEIL.
_ •
. BLAKE & McNEIL,
- Pr.'. M. CUNNING HAM & SON.]
Iron and-Brass Founders,
11UNTINGDON, PA.
IRON and BRASS CASTINGS made in a first class
mgr Foundry. We liavealways on hand all
, tom, kinds of Plow. and Stove Castings, Wash
~.• Kettles, Col lar•is ludou s, Grates, Coal hole.
Castings for pavements, Window weights
of all sizes nail weights, rmejoints, , Sled ,
and cotes, Wagdic, boxes, Aladdin, Castings, fur
steam andater t grist, saw, sumac nu plaster mills of
nil doses 'pitons. .• ' • •
lIBA.TERS AND IRON FENCES,
of the mdst improved style, oven doors and frontal, door
sills, and in f tat ever) thing made in this lino.
We hays a larger stock of patterns, and con furnish cas:
tinge at ehort notice, and cheaper thou they ran be had
in the country. Gat in a good drill, we firs prepared to
do drilling and fitting up of all kinds. „
Office iu Liestars' New Building, Hill street, Hunting
don, Pa.
Melt. IT, 1869. • • a BLAKE Si McNE.IL.
West Huntingdon Foundry.
JAMES. SIMPSQN ' • ' *
• IMISNITACITIES •
PLQWSb ,THRESHING MACHINES,
FARM BELLS, SLIM AND SLRIMI DOLES,
WAGON' BOX ,; IRON liEtnts,
:Cleassibirtsia •
•For Furnaces, Forges, Orlat and SaW Mills, Tanneries
and Itrichyaids,
AND. JOB 4 iFOR,I. GENERA.t. •
ARCHITECTURAL, & ORNAMENTAL DEPARTMENT.
'lron Porticos and Nerandalis,
Balconies; Columns and Drop Ornament for worden
porticos and verandahs,'
Window Lintels and Sills, " ,
Cast Ornarnonts for wooden lintels,
Cellar Window (Wardler all sizes, -
Cliiinney Tops and Flues,
Dash - Weights, Carpet Strips, - -
Registers, Heaters, Coal Uratos, .
Vault Castings for cad nod wood cellars,
Arbors, Tree-boxesrLamp-posts, Ditching-poste,
Iron Railing for.porticos, verandahs, balconies, flower.
beds,• . ' : •
!Park and geinstery Fences,',etc. 1 •
Par:Denier atisiltion paid to fencing (Imlay Lots.
Address 'JAMES SIMPSON,
5e28,68 Runtingdon, Pa.
. , .
EMIL
1869: 1869.
CLOTHING.
H.'. ROMAJM.
MEN AND BOYS' owyryjmo
' JIM
AND WINTER,
OREAP CLOTHINSI STORE.
For Gentlemen's Clothing ei the beet material, and made
In the beet'rratkamelike hammer, call at
•
. ROMAIVS,
ei;postie'tboirotinymuela/dattcpt Ettoting
I=
AND
NEW GQODS,
Just OPENED
THAT
J11.3A
JJET RECEIVED
-RO-14 A N'
HUNTINGDON, PA., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1810.
61obe.
HUNTIN,G6O - N, PA
WE ARE GROWING OLD
We are growing old ! how the thought will
• rise;
When.a glance is backward cast
On some long. remembered spot that lies
In the silence of the past !
It may be the shrine of our Gaily vows,
On the tomb of our early tears ;
But it seems like a ftr•off isle to us
In the stormy sea of years.
Oli! wide and %wild are tho waves that piirt
Our stops from its greenness now,
And we miss thejoy of many a heart
Anti the light of many a brow ;
For deep o'er many a stately barque
Have the whelming billows rolled, '"
That steered with us from that early mark
0 friends! we are growing old.
Old in the dimness of the dust
Of our doily toils and earns ;'
Old in the wreekW of love and trust
Which our burdened memory bears
Ea'oh forth may wear, to the rpassing gaze,
The bloom of life's freshness yet ;
And beams may brighten our latter 'days
Which the morning never met :
But, oh the changes we have seen
In the thy and : winding way ;
The graves in our paths that have grown
green,
Ant the locks that have grown gray !
The winters still•on our way may spars •
The 'sable or the gold;
But wo see their snows upon brighter hair,
, And fOend?, we are growing !dd. •
_ . .
,
We've gained the world's cold wisdom now,
We have learned to praise and fear -,
But where are the living founts whose flow,
. Was a jne J of hearts to hear? , .
. ..
We have won the wealth of many a clime,
And the lore of tunny a pnge;
Bat where is the hope that saw in time .
But its boundless heritage?
Will it come again when thevielet wakes,
And the woods their youth-renew
We have'stood in the light of sunny brakes
Where the blOom is deep and blue.
And our souls might joy in thc,spring•time
- then i '
But the joy was faint and cold,
For it never could give us the youth again
Of hearts that ate growing
[For the Globe./
ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL,
BY TRADE
"I will learn you, you dirty scoun
drel;" thus remarked Mr. Bell as ho
withdrew a No. 10 from the extremity
of Bill Jont.‘:,' cont-tail.
Mr. B. was a good citizen, and was
highly favored by the Creator'in ma
ny respects, yet be lacked one great
object, the goVerriment of temper.
Bill Jones %Vila a young man of six
teen years—one of Nature's beautifdl.
1.19 possessed a reputable character as
well as ability unexhibited and une
qualed by any other young man in the
community.
The town in which they resided bad
a Literary Association. One of its
principal requiremedts - was the read
ing of a manuscEpt paper, weekly.—
Ed Preston was appointed editor for
the - approaching week,-and called on
many of his fel:ow members, among
whom was Bill Jones, for communica
tions. Bill was the first to comply.—
Ire;prepared the following :
"DIED.
.Sometime bet Ween the - commence•
ment of time and the' closing of last
week, a young bawling quadruped of
D. Bell's, aged about as many mouths
again as half and about the same maim
berof days, more cr less. This ani
mal came into existence and bore pros•
poets of long life as welfaS any other
animal of the same kind, but finally
came to its destination by the stoppage
of-breathing.
_Tile cows and other
do
mestics of the farm-yard are requested
to attend the hauling out which will
take place somewhere between the H.-,
sing and setting of the sun.
"Poor calfy lived and diedtigain,
Before it reached the age of ten ;
'lt kicked and bawled and. bawled its last,
-And now its living days are past."
Oi course it was, read at the next
assembling of the , Associalion. , 11.1 r.•
Bell, being present, was' terribly offen
ded, and determined to chastise the
young urchin,
as he termed Jones.—
What course to parstio'*as the query
with Bell. At last,lio .decided that
Abraham, his eldest son; should,retali
ate by replying in the' next . iieue.—
New, Abraham was a tall, robust fig
ure, face covered - with-beard, of inferi
or ability to Jones,and possessed some.
influence among the ladies, which ho
exorcised, largely in the company. 9 1
Josephin'e Dudley, whi6h ias.oftenor
than occasionally.
Josephine lived in the same town
Jones and Bull did, which was known
by the "Station."
The next evening for the meeting of
the Association- arrived. Abraham,
with paternal, considered
himself ready or the occasion. It be
ing generally understood that sport
was brewing betWeeti. Jones and Bell
the attendance was larger than usual.
„Hip communic4tiort- tvas.pootinally
egNiostid and eiptitltid .
insulting were:ait
hiired •to!' Jline`aWiis thentiotied perl-
sonally and-a great effort was made to
raise-,a lane( on the . ,:opitaph of ealty.
After,lhe • res.din... Tomartta Tier°
calla for: hinny ideaii 'having been
advanced, Jones occupisci the floor,
and poaredfoith the following effusion:
,`I-would inform-the Association ,
'Pt a itsairis at the Station, ' '
•
klonz-legged, hairy:gent,
Thid *rate a piece •Makiiificont,' •
And tried hie butte raise a laugh
Oa little -
I have no doubt he sprained his brain
To get hie thoughts m such strain;
•To have there on • the 'paper wrote
To show that be was born a shoat .
TQ Show to this Aettoeietien.
-PVRSEVE'RE.:-
That ho was troubled with irritation.
,
How strange, that such a solid U 1555
Would try to imitate an ass.
But; Abraham, I'd tell 'you here
You need the ass's lengthy,ear,
And I wouhrhave you bear in mind
You need the ass's tail behind.
Now, let toe tell you, as it friend,
Never to such things attend ;
Always try, to others dU
As you would have them do to you ;
Neier try two things* once—
Never imitate a dunce.
Then, the best advice of mine.
Is, go and sec yout..lbsephine." •
WO will let the, reader, imagine the
sensation of the Association.
Itr was after the Society adjourned
and:on the way homeward that. the
difliculty occurred whicli I mentioned
in'„the beginning of my 'narrative.
•The result was, Bells and Joneses at
enmity with each other. Week - after
week' passed, but' the Bells did not
.speak to the Joneses, neither did the
Jon6s speak to the Mils. Inconvei3i
.ence-frequently ensued: If a tea par
ty was given by any o r the elite of the
conni'ry, the company of the ono NOB
solicited as well as the other. If any
of the family of the one would attend,
, the other would learn it and remain
away. Indeed, so great was the enmi
ty towards each other, that neither
would attend nor contribute to .the
Society of the Poor,, io Which they
had, always attended regularly and
contributed liberally.' - What the one
would be co»nectbd,With the other
would oppose If one. dealt at the
store on the corder the other would,'go
to the store up to . wn, or if ono em
ployed Dr. B the pther• would call' in
Dr. Q. So extensively did enmity ex
ist between them that it became- th'e
general gossip, and numerous wore the
whya and means devised to procure
peace and frienali . ,'lceling, but all
failed.
Now, respecting the'fmancial of
and, position in the community, Bell,
Sr:, could not boast over Jones, Sr.—
Both: were wealthy aMI equally situa
ted. Even the families numbered the
same—four of each.
Itiss Emma Bell wa's about entering
her — teens. She possessed a vory•re
finekand elegant appearance for, so
yOung a nutdanfoiselle; had attended
the village school until her eleventh
year, since then at the seminary of 11.,
where .she purposed rem aining until
that. institution 'would confer the hon
or; of graduation. Iler intellectual
ability was superior to Abraham's,
consequently, more expense and great
er care were exercised in her moral
and intellectual training.
'Clara Junes was a young lady of
very amiable ability, refined Manners
and polished education. She tres an
expert in all she undertook, front the
=kiln the kitchen to ttle"kid'Y'llillie
parlor. She was accomplished. Her
suitors were numerous and report was
already current that she was engaged.
Nobody knew the appointed day.
During the oil excitement in western
Pennsylvania, Bell became so deeply
involved in stock that his presence
Was necessary ; consequently, he re.
Moved thither.
Two years later, Jones moved his
family to D— county, Wk., where
ho had invested extensively in lands
which of late years, had increased
considerably in value.
Ten years later ; I took.a trip to the
"Land or Lakes" for the purpose of
prospecting and while there called on
my old friend Jones Of course, I was
anxious to hear .of Bill and was glad
to learn that be lived in the same town .
and oil the sate street 'Jones, Sr., did.
"After' dinner Nro will go up and see'
said' Jones, Sr.',
The houp.at hand we were at Bill's
—the old, familiar name sounds the
best—and imagine my surprise when
receiving an' introduction to 11.1. rd.
Jones -- Bill's ivire—fornierly Miss Em
ma Bell.. It was with difficulty that 1
could realize it.
-"That, is not,the cream of the joke,
Traver reinarked Bill: "This even
ing we will_ero,s to the other side of
the 'lake and see Abraham."
,"Ahraham Bell r asked
.ilres," answered Bill.'
"Is he married ?" I tt;lted.
"Why, aro
,yon that far behind the
tittles?" responded Bill. "lie bats been
marded nearly (bur years, and they
have three babies."
—"Three babies ! why, who did he
marry
"Sister Clara,":heanswered.
"Is it por-sible l" Lexelaimed
with astonishment. -"
"Yes, te-morrow, when at leisure, I
will relate the circumstances, particu
larly, to you."
1 awaited anxiously OM arrival. of
the time. It . came, and Bill, accord
ing to promise, prci6ccded :
"Trace, take my telescope 'and look
down the country about-three. miles."
I looked.
"Do you see that , reddish-looking
house ?" he asked. "
I answered affirmatively. '
"That's where:Stunuel Bell resideo,"
continued He is the brother of
our_ enemy at the Station;.and owns
all the land within five miles square,
extending one mile on. this side of that
house and four miles on the other.—
That is ono mile east and four miles
west, and about two , and three-quar
ters north and one, and ono-quarter
south. That white house,yon observe
is where our "oil speculator" lives. He
fizzlod when ho was boring for the ole:
aginous matter. When we moved
hero we owned all that land of Samuel'
Boll's, in addition to what we have
now. Two years after we came here
Samuel purchased and built
immedi
ately. The third year he brought his
I family, and we have been on most in
timate terms."
"During the fourth year the white
house was built. And just five years
from the time we !lift the Station, my
father-lb-law occupied the .White, map.-
sica. I presume ruy sstordshmant at
. . '
,'. Nl:= '- , • :
....z' • ~
4's :'•'...,-', Al:. • . ~.
. . .4.
fit,-. ;'!:' ''" ,3 :; " - '-
] 1 . ..
1% ,cili\i,,
~ -.....,_..5., ,;:.:, ~....,..`- . -,..,.
- -' r .- / I' x '3- At -'• -' •
that timo•was equal to .yours yester
day. '
"During the greater part of the sum
mer before they moved, Emma was at
her uncle's and I formed a new ac
quaintance." •
"Did she graduate at II? I asked. .
"o, yes, just ono year before her fa
ttier became : Insolvent," ho answered.
"Well it scorns strango, but how does
it come that Abe inurried. Clara?
It, was rumored she was .engaged,
when .at the Station." • „.
"So sho , was. Poor
~ Ed „ho died ;
with icsingular disease' ; -
. .
"Ed:L'reston you have reference to,
I presume '1" • , .
. .
'Yes. .The physicians. couldn't do
anything- for him. Poor Clara! I
pitied. her, but "All's .well that ends
well.. ' .
"Is'Abe in business?" I inquired.
"Yes, indeed, very extensively.—
Didn't you notice that largo brick
store•room.on the corner below fath
er's ?" ho asked.
"Yes "1 replied.
"Weil, he is in the mercantile busi
ness there. That.stone-building. store
and .a tract of ono hundred ,acres of
land north :of 'town, are in hiss name,
but more than the half of it belongs to,
the old gentleman.' That's their own
business, you know." '
,
MARRIAGE. SHORN OF ,POETRY,--LThe
Rev. D., a Methodist minister, station
ed at Mnadville,„Pa , sOrne years ago,
one evening received a note informing
him that a couple living in the suburbs
of the city tlepireil to be unitcd . in the
bonds of matrimony, and requested his
services at nine o'clock in,the morning.
At the proper time he went to the
house,designated. , lie inquired of a
young who was busy ,wznibing
dishes if there vas a couple therm Vlid
wished. to, be, mart ied. •
"Lam the lady," said she, blushing
"Sohn will be in, in a moment." "
The minister was surprised to seo no
preparations, and so stepped to the
door to view the surroundings. Two
mean were. bard at work grinding
scythes in the yard, and another, who•
proved.to. be the "John," was tending
a cow and calf. The young lady came
to the.door pretty soon and liouted
"John, John, hurry ; the preacher's
here !"
John leaped the fence and rushed to
the house, the girl wiped her hands on
her apron, and after joining hands,
said they were ready. The minister
proceeded and had jest got through
qttestioning they - nun man when' the
old lady rushed into the room, shout
ing : .
"John, John, you didn't turn the cow
nwny frou tho calf ?
Ile let go his sweetheart's hand, in -
stahtly, and rushed into the barnyard,
put the old.cow through ,thc. bars, Attid
then retarded to Alie house, dgaih -took
his position, when the remainder °NA;
ceremony was performed. The mitt
inter went on his way, John went to
the bay fields, and the lady resumed
her dish-washing.—Forest (Pa) Rcpub
lican.
Teaching from House to House,
."Let Inc maka you acquainted" is
the American formula fur which Euro
peans substitute "Allow mo to intro
duce.", Each hits its advantages; each
is characteristic. Lttroduction
America implies.acquaintance,at least,
possible; but it does not in Europe.
We ministers need to go to the
houses of our 'people, that they may
be assured we are in earnest about
them. They do not wonder if we talk
earnestly when a 'congregation is' be
fore us. slost mon fuel the stimulus
ofa crowd. But, if they find us in
their hodsoif its much in earnest about
a family or an individual as in the pul
pit, they will begin to behove in, us
and in the religion we represent. It is
thus that the old law realizes itself
"A house-going minister makes a
churchgoing people." -
We ministers must'go to the people
in their houses, that they may know
us. What no idea a man' who works
very hard all the week has of the
ister whom he never sees but ,in the
pulpit and never hears hut' in the
clarotion Of divine trhth ! .llo' comes
to think him a sublimated,
,ethereal
person; who'wallts_ withwit toughing
earth; without passions, feelings, ex
cept.offiefal, or sympathies.
,So, also,
in somemay, of her. 'own, ,thinks his
wife:' And both consider that it is all
very nice for him to talk .'so at, the
height of his pulpit;! but if ho- were
like thein l and had' to come 001 'to
their life, he'Wohld fitid it another
entirely. And agfor thechildren,
they, are apt to regard a'minister as a
heing•between whom and them there
there is al grcaLgalf . fixed, which could
only be bridged, over by their going
to college and seminary, when they
grow to be men, and then getting or
dained—whatever that may mean.—
But. if we 'go ti kindly,, plain, sensible
men, "without any nonsense," and see
the family in their own house,. - talk• to
them, enter into their life, and bring
ohr Sabbath-Meitsago. to . Merit in their
own tongue wherein they wore born,
they come into. sympathy' with tte,
learn to feel that atter•all religion bad
to •rork.in us on, much the same mater
ial as in them.--dka..Mia Hall.
An editor of a paper informed his
readers' that the ladies alWays 'pull off
the; eft stocking last, This, is may be
supposed, created some stir amoog the
fair readers, and while in positive terms
they denied the statement, -they
sisted that he had no business to know
it, even if such were the fact, and pro
nounced him no gentleman. He proves
it; however; by a short argument
•"When one stocking is pulled off there
is another left on; pulling .off this ie
taking theleft stocking off lgst."
ste,- Subsoribe for Tur. Gr,ezz.
MN
TE4TIES, , $2,00 a yeai in advance.
DT REV. T. DE wiTT:TAMiIAbiI.
Scene : A crisp morning. Carriage
with' spinning wheeley,whose spokes
glisten. like splinters of the sun. Roan
horse, lecked with foam, bending into
the bit, his polished feet drumming the
pavement im , Ohallenge of any horse
that thinks ho can go as fast. , Two
boys running to get on the back of the
carriage. Ono of them with 'quick
spring succeeds. , •The:cither leaps, but•
falls and fills' en , lholuirt; of tho body
whbre it is most appnpriate to fall.—
No 'sooner' had - strack • the 'ground.
thakbe shoUts' to' 'the!! driver' of the ;
ca'rriage; "Out behind ' '•' • •
Haman nature the 'sfrio'in' boy -as
man. Alt running tolgaik the vehicle
of success. Some aro-spry, and 'gain
that for 'which ' they = strive. Others
:11'68k:4;0d tumble down k they who
fall ' ci•ying out against' the.ise whO
mount; "Cut behind • - ' -
A political officer rolls past. A Mill
titude spring to their feet, and the race
is in. Only one of all the number
reaches that for whictr , he runs. No
sooner does liegain the prize, and he
gin to )siipo the sweat from his brow,
arid think how grand a , thrng is to
ridoin popular pref&rment, than the
disappointed candidates cry out ;'"ln
competency ! Stupidity I•Praild ! Now
let theAteWspatrers arid iplatformal of
the country, "Out behind '
There ig'a golden' chariot of wealth
rolling'dowif- the street thousand
peoPle 'are trying catch it They
run. They; Jostle.; 'They' treatron
eaclrcither. Push tind Pull; arid ttigl
Those talk 'most: against — Helios; who
caiinoCget them. elder the track fdr:
the racers! Ono-of the thousand reach- -
eS the golden Prize and mounts.; Forth
with the air is full' ohcries : -"Got it'hY
fraud ! Shoddy! PetrolOm ; aristoenr
ey ! His father was a ragpicker His;
mother was•a;washerWoman FI knew
him - when he: blackened his own shbos !
Pitch him'off the buck part'of the gol
den • chitribt! Cut behind ! Cut behind !"
It is strango•there should'bo any ri
valries among . tln3 ministers of religion,'
when there is:so much' room for all''to
werk. But in somethings they are
much like others. Like all other class
es of men, they Inive one liver 'apiece,.
and here and there of them a spleen
In all cases the epigastric region is
higher up than the hypogastrie, save
in the act of turning sornerset Like
others, they cat, three times a day
when 'they can get anything tb -
Besides tine. - - it, sometifnes "happens
that We find_ them racing' for some
profession, chair or pulpit. Thoy'run
well—neck and neck—:white.ehurches
look on and xN;onder wheaibr;it will be
"Dexter" or, the
deep
Rowels plunge deep find ,ilerce is the
cry. "Go 'long! Go long!" The privi T
loge ofpreaching the Gospel to the poor
on live thousand dollarsayear isenougli
to make a tight race anywhere. But
only ono mounts the coveted place;
and forthwith the cry goes up 'in the
associations and , synods :;`.'Unlit.;for
the place! Can't preach'. Unsound in,
faith I Now is your chance, oh, con,
ferences and presbyteries, to Cut Be
hind !" , . -
A fair woman passes. Wo all ad
mire beauty. flu that says he don't
Um. A. canting man; who: told, me he
had no 'admiration fox.anything earth
ly, used instead of listening the sermon
to keep squinting overboard the •pew
where sat Squire Brown's,daughter.—
W.hother,God plants a rose in parterre
or human cheek, wo, must admire it,
whether we will or ' .'we
arc deciding ; whether, \'e ;had better
take that dahlia, the dahlin; takes us.
A star doeA not ask the astronomer,
to admire it; but, just winks at him,
and he' surrenders, 'with all his tele
scopes. This fair. woman in society
has many 'satellites. TIM boys all
run for the prize. One . : of them, not
ha,vingyead enough novels to learn
that ugliness is maim desirable than'
beauty, 'wins her..., The cry is up :
"She paitils! Looks' well; but she
knows it. Geed shape ;.but I wonder
what is 'the pyide :ef cotton ! Won't
sfie make ItIM ataad around ! Practi
cability worth more than' black eyes !
Fool to•marry,''a virago !" ' • , "
lir inany'eyes success is a crime.
dti'hof like' you," Said, 'the snoWflake
to "the snowbii.d • '.Why ?" said . , tlin
snoWbird:':' "Because," said the snow
flake- "yiiitiaiT going up, and I mn go
ing dounir '• ' •
. .
'lVe,haVe testate that the man in
the, 'carriage 'on th'e Crisp morning,
riacl,:t
_long with
which he could have made the
ing boy yell most lustily,' did not; 'Vtd,
behind. Ho was an old man ; ih the'
corner of his• men th -a- smile, , :which
was' always as reads;"to play as a kit
ton that' watithcs 'for some ono - wi ill ; a
string to 'Off. r 'the -Slightest induce
ment." He heard' the shout in the
rear, itril'ettid "Gocid morning,
My so'n'.
That 'is right; climb over and 'sit', by
the. Hare are the reins ; take; hold'
and drive. Was a boy myielf
und.l. know whatAieklcs yoUng'sters.",
Thank:God there are so many in the
world that never"eut behind," but are
rowdy to give's fe,lloit arid© whenet,
er he wants if: Here is yoiiiik man,
clerk in a store. He has small 'wages,
and a,mother to take eare of., For
ten 'years,he'st a
ruggles to get in high
er.place. ' The first of Januarfeernes,
add theltead of the:Commermal'honis
lboke reUnd and myth, '"Trying to get
up;are you?"' And by the time three
more years haTe 'pissed, the bey . site
right beside the old than who hands
over`the `r6int; "Drive I" - for the old
merchant kneirwhati would tickle the
younister';' , "' To'natEtart Goodhue -was
a boy behind the counter ;lout his em.'
ployor gave him a ricle,''and London;
Canton and Calcutta lieard'the scratch
of his pen.—Lenox, Grinnell,''and the
Aspinwalls carried in - any,Y9uog men
NO. 29.
Out Behind,
TO SUBSCRIBERS;
Those subscribing foithiee, a siic or
twelve months with the unclerstadWhi
that the paper be - diseontinued ) unlesS
subscription is renewed;reeooiiig,iii) . 4:
per-marked with u f_bbfere the_name._
will understand that „thk,thine_ kW .
which they subscribed is uP: nie§.
wish-the paper continued they-19t
their: subseriPtipathr*igh"ai4
Otherwise. . • .
um, Afl ideas of p4111,,,f)99y
oreamen tat, Ibb Printing n neat.l4,Msiti.
expedtipusiy eliaelated at the '!Grwzr'
Tice. Terms moiler4t6,., , .
uil
a mile on the high ioad priii3perty:
- There arc hundreds of Veo'ple
chief joy is to help others titi: -
feu sniile;,nowl a gpod wsitd;
dollars. ActanSr such• a kind man
ways have a- carriage Ao ride in'and
horse .11 et too, iski be' goes:.
down the, bilt.offif,d;
,iney„the, breech-,. r
ing strap he strong.. enough,
brick the load. WhOn he rid'd'en to "'
the end of the earthly' faiid;'
have pleihy-of friend's Ito; help bim-itmdl
hiteh,and assist him, Ant of : ; car., J
riage. On thatpool, night ; it, will be ,
pleasant to hang , the whip' with
which ho drove the enterprises of &-
lifetime,
,and feel that: With it he / newel'
‘etit'behincf ; ' at thoiniw;hp Wereatirw,
Where the Wages o.o7Soberthdlights
for :Workingmen,, , --
:Why' is it that so'many of rho firir~
lies Of th'e falibring men in 'imir'tb*iiii"
and cities liVe in, such'a pooi , beggardllt
ly way, and in so many damp"; dark,:
basements, and-up-in-such close, con
fined, ricketty old atticks 7 Many"-of
'the heads , tlf ,these fittnilies .receivO,
good .wages, and, get their pay,., every d
- week or in . Opth,ren- It
ularlv.
,luwhere
in too Many crises,
do' their 'gagese
to-? Not to the baker, the grecor,tb€l l
butcher,' the inerdhant ;.• they ::go
strong drink, ale and, heer, , _:which
not strengthen • the,.phyttieal ; man.,,--q ; ,
Franklin taught the printers of Lon
don thaveold water better
ale; and:66ld; Water.:haa lost; none' of
its virtues' in:l4o years. • :1; .1
Tk,‘ cost of tipplingis in the -aggrez
gate etiormotaiL'.'Tlie inquiry is often
made, how aro so - -many drinkihr
hoitses 'sustained'? Cot us' see. - - Twen
ty:mon, at 30 'cents a day, twill .pay - i
one of the "tippling shops" 523,90 ; A l
year., A man who pays thirty contstt
dtif for "drinliti; ; ' pays $109'50 a'year.
This is:tha interest-on sl,s64iito7:Jpeel
cent. at „simp i ley,interest
30 cents a day, amounts in ten years„;
to 51,171 95, All this is wasted, paid
out for "an enemythat stealiraiv - ay
man's brain's," and robs him and his' ;
fatally of every comfort., . Intoxicating4:i
liquors give, neither, strength to 4.1.113',: i
body, vigor to the inind,:resOlutiop to"
the will, el6vation to 'the' Morale' nee
dignity ,to the Chararter::Strong-driolt
drags a,-man down from,.bis,,bigh„qs-
tate, - depraves, all his , appetites, ,and
leits'eS bini in want and misery - , - .tl4'
mere wreck acidseniblance‘of a man:'''''
-The constant use of lutoxiCating -li, -
quors makes hard times fori many , ail
man ; thus, a .family of five. persons
will consume , 'fotir barrels of flear' - a - ,
year, or 1,060 liotitids' Of'
is-nearly three:lit:Muds-a; daY.--Good;? ,
flour can-be bought now at - $7. a. bar=;;
rel.; four times seven MACS , ;_add. ;
thirty edritti - 4 day . for, drinks: is $109, r ,,
50, or 582,50 M -or& tier year than' 09'
bread "for ti family-'of five ''pertions"
costs. , "But,". , says A., ."1-"only take%
two drinks a day.';',,
pay then for your drinks ,87,a . year f
only 515 more than yew
,pity'forlile
bread consumed by your whole' family .
if it contains five persons. This Bunt:
would, provide tea and coffee for.theint, z
here, then, i we seo, that i ,the,,mag.
who, pays eveU,tiVenty genie a
day foi'
liquor 'spends a' sum stiffidieht to sup=
ply his family - with bread; tea 'and coil':
fee'for the' year. Iti. , -itrstrange, -that •
times aro hard—that men complain . or,
the Government, and charge that .li,
oppresseli'thezii With' 'onerous "taxes`?
The above:figures show-how men.taai
themselves; and how. they tax properly
too. „,
.
In• 1868 the4nobriatO Asylum .cost.
the tax payees of.ilis eity•5144,472,40;'
While the amount of money paid by"
the city for flmir•for• all its hospitals,:•
asylums, and for the relief.of:tho poor,•,
was only. .1,02,,.5,7 . 3 3S. „ ' .• i,
Tie outilOer'peor cost the7citi,j , ,.iri.
1868, $122,228 64. How much of, this
could be' charged•to inteinportincer 2 V'
The•number of persons ~committebr I
to the workhouse in this city
was 15,738. .the Commissioners„su„
"a Considerable:proportidn'of theCoM
mittals is'forintokication" 'The
. pol
lieu statitinN.the prisolis,,the almhousH
es, the penitentiary,,'the , _ miserable;
homes, all-tell of the—work of intem
perance. ,It is the great curse of :CIO'
land—it feeds upon the wages of labor;,
and-like.the liorseleech's,daughtpr,."it;
cries give, give," until, all iiiutgone, ; ef
h e alth, ebaracter,,life.—;.A, Y,—Ppse.r,
TupSpcnt4l: 77 ".ll.othor,"sakla'philit
ten, yoars ofpgq,,q .k
;wmut t , tonpiv„titt?
,
scorn!. of-your ,away tutfind . ey,Fy
night and morning
"Why, my child,?!'._
"Beetlsc, IV must be, to L ses spme,ohe
you,loy,e vory, much!! „. „, ,
"AO think 5n,?!..?„.
‘_‘lgeoaeselllways tl 4t ifhtitl ;
you come,hapk you appear Lobe, more
happy .t.4a
f.. Well suppose-I .do . go' and seo
Friend I love, very„initel6, and:that-after.,
seeing film eoa_couyer'§ing.,Nyi,thjlire,-,
I :Cm more happY that,. before, why..
should you wish to kho_W, anything
bou ?"t
lecf:,use
• wish to do 'as you do;,,
that I may'b,e happy too.". ..
.0Y.911,,,thy wlian; I leave yott
in the morning and atoning it is „to, -
ool i n u no w ith my Sayiour ; :go ta,
ask him forlds grace to make mo holy
and happy. '• :wk/ilia to assist me is
all the duties of the Tday,,and especial
ly to keep me froka committing, any
B i n against him,, and ahe t vq. all,l ask ,
him to have mercy on you, and save
you from;tho miseries of thosa,who site,
against him."
_• , •
"0, that is the secret r said the child;
then -I must ge with you." ,
;—•The.'tew.:boat Star, of PittebtirO r
collided with's bridge on :the' Ohio;
river; On Suu'day evening; and; 'sunk
with seven coal baigie. ka eho .was
einking, her , boiler exploded . *V 'a.
Wolfetah"viras