The Beaver radical. (Beaver, Pa.) 1868-1873, January 03, 1873, Image 2

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    2
- COURTING IN CHICAGO.
Chicago has long been notorious for
her divorces, bat ahe has not, hitherto, in*
joyed any special-distinction over her sis*
ter cities in the nmtter of tourtship.; d A
marriage which oocnr redin that city last
week is, however, entitled 19 notice as
showing 4he strength affection, arid
long-suffering constancy of a Chicago
maiden, known tg> her acquaintances and
to Mr. Joel H. Wicker, during the coarse
of asevea.years’ conrtship r asMi6sSarsh
Golan. It is the old story of a lonely
widower and his pretty housekeeper, bat
the incidents of this connubial voyage are
not common to every-day life, at least
outside of Shortly after their
engagement the waning infatuation of the
lover was manifested in a desire t 6 post
pone the wedding-day. This was done
until four years had passed away, when
another objection presented itself to Mr.
Wicker’s mind. His future wife must
be educated to a standard sta
tion she was to occupy. Accordingly, a
year’s polishing at a polished boarding
school in Detroit was added to the charms
of Miss Golan. Bat still the fastidious
Wicker was not satisfied, and, as his dis
taste for the proposed union became more
marked, be employed a couple of detec
tives to follow the lady, throw all manner
of temptation in her way, and bring him
evidence of her nnchastity. The minions
performed their mission faithfully, but at
the end of two years* constant service
were compelled to report to their employ
er that the lady was “as virtuous as she
was handsome and intelligent ” Then the
Chicago fire came, and Wicker, saying
that he was reduced to poverty, tearfully
released his lady love from her engage
ment. But his tears were quickly dried
when she Replied, in accordance with es
tablished custom, that she loved him not
for his riches and would wed him for his
noble self, or words to that Effect And
when, shortly afterward, she sued him for
breach of promise, and to render the case
more interesting, laid her damages at
$75,000, he had a convincing and touch*
ing proof of woman’s unselfish and un
changing devotion to her heart’s choice.
The case went through the lower conrts |
and when it reached the docket of the
Superior Court the bashful lover felt the
arrows of Cupid so strongly that he ex
pressed a willigness to compromise the
matter by marrying the plaintiffs The
faithful girl consented, and this is the
Inter-Ocean's account of tbejoyfnl occa
sion : v
“When ushered into the parlor the li
cense was produced and found to be for
Hoxy Wicker. The bridegroom, with an
oath, declared that he “supposed that he
must marry that girl” and took his posi
tion on the floor, muffled up in overcoat
and furs, holding his hat In his hand. The
ceremony began; the reluctance of the
bridegroom was such that the questions
had to be repeated to him before he won Id
answer; the bride responded promptly by
bowing. At the order to join hands they
merely touched each other’s fingers an in
stant. The ceremony concluded, the ben
edict turned away from his wife with an
oath and the remark that, now She had
attained her wish, she might go her way
with her “pals.” He started to leave,
but she. quick as light, sprang to his side,
and walked with him to the street. He
again ordered her to go to the brothel
from whence she bad come, but sbe
sprang into his carriage, which was stand
ing near, and remarked cheerily, “Lot us
drive home, Mr. Wicker.” He got in
slowly after her; they turned the horses
around and drove to the Barnes House,
where be registered himself as “J. H.
Wicker, and wife, Beloit, Wis,” They
were consigned to rooms, a fire was built
for them, and the party who had follow
ed at a distance to see the denonment of
this strange comedy waited outside, ex
pecting to see the bridegroom rush forth,
mount his buggy, knd abandon his wife
forever. But he came not; the horse re
mained where be was first fastened 'the
whole night, and until nice o’clock the
next morning, when the weary watchers
withdrew, full of wonder at the result”
THE “TRIBUNE” TRANSFORM*-
Schuyler Colfax Amnmes the Editorial
Chair—History of the Negotiations.
(From, the New York "World, 17th nit.)
The following is the history of the
events which have culminated in the
transfer of the editorship of the Tribune
to Hr. Schuyler CoPax: On Friday last
there was a meeting of the trustees of his
paper. When the future course and
management came* up for discussion it
was found that five trustees were in favor
of continuing Mr Whitelaw Reid in the
management, and of carrying out the
programme laid down by Mr. Greeley du
ring the brief period after the election in
which be again exercised the editorship.
The other two were in favor of inviting
Mr. Colfax to the editorial chair, and of
wheeling the paper into line with the ad
ministration sheets.
The stockholders friendly to Mr. Colfax
and his policy, finding that the decision
was going against them, determined to
epde&vor to get np a combination that
Would enable them to carry their ends by
controlling a majority of the stock. Mr.
Samuel Sinclair, the publisher of the Tri
bune, was then found to control fifty one
shares. 'Mr. Reid, Mr. John Hay, and
some outsiders raised the money to buy
thirty-two shares from Mr, Sinclair: . The
latter refused to sell at $lO,OOO ashare.
The opposition offered $10,500 per share,
but Mr. Sinclair said that his obligations
to certain other stockholders made it la
TION.
peralive upon him to. refuse lbs offer.
He then sold to Mr. Orton.
Hivßefd, finding the other stockhold
ers Indifferent about selling their stock,
sawthathe was checkmated, and on con
sideration with his backers concluded to
give up the battle and sell put . /
.Then there was a general transfer Aud
“Unloading” of stocks by small holders,
William O. Orton and bis party being the
buyers Mr.rßeid sold his four shares and
Colonel HayJiia two shares. Mr. Ripley
sold all of his except one, Mr. Booker
sold all of his except one, Oliver John
son sold his one.sbare and takes the man
agement of the Christian Union. Mr.
Fitzpatrick sold all of his except one, and
Mr. Runkle is 'supposed to have sold hisl
Mr. O'Rourke sold all of his except one.
This transfer practically extinguishes the
“associative” feature of the paper. Mr.
Greeley’s favorite plan concerning the
management was" that all worthy super
intendents of the concern should have a
voice in the management that should be
something more than nominal. Hence
forth two or three large stockholders will
have unlimited say.
Mr. Orton called upon Mr. Reid on
Monday night and offered him the posi
tion of managing editor. Mr. Reid refus
ed it.
Mr. Orton then proposed to Col. John
Hay to retain hia position as editorial
writer. Mr. Hay also refused.,
Mr. Orton then offered Mr. Hassard the
position of managing editor. Mr. Has
sard has the offer under consideration,
and will probably accept.
Mr. Shanks, the city editor, had offered
bis resignation on the 6th inst., but it was
refused by Mr. Reid. Mr. Shanks again
tendered his resignation in writing. It
was a second time refused. He will prob
ably remain.
Mr. Reid baa given all the Tribune staff
whose work is not political to understand
that he does not consider them bound in
honor to share bis voluntary exile ; and
it is likely that there will be no changes
in the non-political department.
Mr. Retd will continue in charge of the
paper, as a favor to Mr. Orton, nntll Sat
urday next. He will then probably study
the field for some months before engag
ing in any new enterprise.
Eight of the shares bought by Mr. Or
ton are said to be reserved for Mr. Col
fax. Dr. Ayer parts with eight of bis
funrteen shares.
WHAT MR. REID SAYS.
The writer called yesterday upon Mr.
Whitelaw Ileid for the purpose of learn
ing how close an approximation. of facts
was contained in the story circulated as
to the change of ownership of the
stock. Mr. Reid said:
“It is true as to the greater..part, al
though a few of the .detailsare somewhat;
incorrect., At the meeting yesterday
(Monday) Mr. William Orton purchased
fifty-one shares of the stock, thus obtain
ing a majority and-consequently a con
trolling Interest. I offered to take thirty
two shares at $lO,OOO a share, instead of
sixteen, as reported, but that offer was not
accepted.”
“It is said that you will retain the man
agement of the paper anti) the end of the
present week.” *
“Yes; I consented to do so at the re
quest of Mr. Orton, with whom; my re
lations have always been verwcordial.
Of course I could have no connection
with the Journal after a change of policy
had been decided upon by the stockhold
ers. ” -
“How many of those now connected
with the Tribune accompany yon in your
retirement?’’
“Many offered to do so, and sent in
their resignations; hot most of those I
have retained. and in fact discouraged re
signing as ranch as I could, so the staff
of lhe paper will not be materially affect
ed bv the change. Colonel Hay is the on
ly one who peremptorily resigns, and he
did so a few days ago."
“It Is an established fact, then, that
Mr. Colfax is to take charge of the Tri
bune?”
“Tea. It is to be made an administration
paper, as 1 understand it, and be is to ex*
cise the control,”
“Will you allow me to ask what foun
dation there was for the story published
about Mr. Greeley’s articles being alter*
ed?"
“That is so absurd that I must decline
to answer it further than by referring to
the card already made public.”
The card to which Mr. Reid alluded
was to the effect that when Mr. Greeley
sent the article entitled “Crumbs of Com
fort” he wrote a paragraph explaining
that he was not its author and disclaim
ing its purpoit. When the proof of this
was brought him he drew bis pen across
it and wrote another, telling his secreta
ry to have the first “killed,” and Its sub
stitute “set up” Instead. The secretary
encbsed both to Mr, Reid, as he was ac
customed to do with all of Mr. Greeley’s
articles.; When Mr. Reid received the
two articles at night be wrote to Mr.
Greeley saying that he would hold them
both over for consideration upon the
morrow, and that they were approved of.
The next day Mr. Greeley expressed him
self as satisfied with Mr. Reid’s action,
and said nothing about the Tribune's
making any reference at all to the obnox
ious article. The card then stated some
generalities as to the warm brotherly af
fection, never interrupted, which always
existed between the two adding
that Mr. Reid had the widest discretion
in altering Mr. Greeley’s articles or leav
ing them out aUogether. .Bfatblng fur
ther was said about the nop-prlnted par
agraphs.
THE RADS
Among the sharea by
SincWrwere thetwsvnbfr^^
tatc, aod all the other irnateesinelsted
that Mr. Sinclair was bonuduuder the
by-lawsof theamociatlon&ieU to them
before selling at the sdme prfoi to an nnt*
sideparty. Mr. Sinclair, howeTer.clalm
ed to be under ohllgatlonstoothers which
heoonld not discharge save by complet
ing the transaction offifty-one shares with
Mr. Orton. It is expected that ex-Gov
ecnor B. D. Morgan, ex-Snryeyor A. B.
Cornell, and others of that wing of the
Republican party, are to unite with Mr,
Orton in carryingthe ntock. In the final
sale Mr. Sinclair retained three of his
shares, and it Is understood desires to
continue as publisher.
The salutatory of Vice President Col
fox on the occasion of his taking posses
sion of the editorial chair of the Tnbune
will appear in this morning’s issue of that
paper or within a few days.
THE EDITORIAL STAFF.
The following names will be read with
interest as being those of the gentlemen
forming the editorial and city staff of the
Tribune, under the old regime. In the ed
itorial department Messrs- Whitelaw
Head, Oliver Johnson, and John May
have already tendered their resignations:
TenrroßjtAT. sBFABTUBMf.
Whitelaw Reid, John R. G. Hassattf,
Oliver Johnson, John Hay, Noah Brooks,
George Ripley, Charles T. Congdon, Mrs.
Moulton, Mrs. R. H. Davis, Mrs.L.G. C.
Rankle, Mrs. G. H. S. Hall, Mrs.-Laura
Lyman, Miss Hutchinson, Miss Kate
Fields, W. C. Wyckofi, Z. L. White, J. 8,
Pike, W. M. O’Dwyer, C. 8. Hunt, J. L.
Hance, P. T. Quinn, William H. Trafton,
£. E. Sterns, H. J. Ramsdell, B, C. Stead*
man, A. B. Crandell, ID. Nicholson, J. B.
Bishop. H. H. St. Clair, Clarkson Taber.
CITY STAFF.
Wm. B. G. Shanks, Goo. W. Pearce, W.
P. Sullivan, J. J. Chambers, B. B. Taber,
T. F. Blackwell, A. N. Leet, B. C. Cald
well, H. J. Mason, Henry Chadwick, D.
J. Sullivan, Tom Me Waters,Thomas
Drury, L N. Ford, Geo, B. Miles, H. H.
Mason. £.. L. Murlin, D. N. Beach, Wm.
A. Harris, J. A. Colvin, S. J. Dederick,
A. C. Ives,
JVPICUL SALABIES.
The New York World makes the follow
ing pointed comparison between the sala
ries received by judges in that city, and
our national judges:
For the nation there are, over all the
States, one Chief Justice and eight asso
ciates, six circuit judges, and forty-nine
district judges (including Territorial and
other such magistrates,) making sixty-four
judges in all While for the city and
county there are :
6 Marine Court judge 5........ $60,000
1 Recorder judge >^,ooo
1 City lodge ~ ,
9 District Police judges. . ,
6 Superior Court judges.... .>' W,opo,
6 Common Pleas judges...;... 90,000
5 Supreme Court judges....... fif,soo
43 Total. .. ... $58T,600-
. Let us now inquire what Congress ap
propriated last year for the salaries of the
judicial force of the whole nation; Here
it is: i '
For Chief Justice $ 8,500
For eight Associate justices 64,00$
For nine Circuit judges, to reside :
in circuit*••**••**•••• •• ••••*.« sijooo
For salaries of the District judges 1
of the United States 178,000
For salaries of the Chief Justice ;
of the Supreme Court of the /
District of Columbia and lour
Associate judges. 20,000
For salaries of five judges of the vv ■
Court of Claims, the chief clerk
and assistant clerk, bailiff, and , -
messenger thereof. 27,000
Total. ■,
Thus showing that the judicial force, of
that city costs the tax payers therein
$187,660 more than the whole judicial
force of the United States posts the na
tion. What will' the “reformers 1 * now
in powdr In the city and Albany do . abopt
it ? What will Congress say to this expo
sure ? Shall city salaries go constlthwn*
ally down, or Federal salaries go up?; Or
shall It be both movements? We cannot
believe it at all necessary that there be so
many courts in this country, with such an
army of clerks, deputies, stenographers*
bailiffs, attendants, and the like. What
need of six Marine Court judges and bine
District Civil judges? Why the distinc
tion between a Superior;; Court and a
Common Pleas Court? Cannot the Gipy*
ernor elect and his party soon to be in
power simplify and, by constitutional
methods, economize uhr judicial county
machinery? • ;
The natural history editor of the Lex
ington, Kentucky, Prm tells this: *‘A
lady residing in a city not a hundred
miles from Lexington is the posessor of
two pets—a monkey and a parrot—who
are by no means, congenial friends; in
(act Mrs. Ci was in the habit of locking
up the monkey whenever she left the
house, for fear of his belligerent quali
ties. One evening, alas! she neglected
to do so, and the monkey coming in found
(he parrot ready for fight, and a desper
ate one ensued. The monkey ruthlessly
pulled out every feather of the unfortu
nate parrot, and broke up the mantel or
naments, and smashed things generally.
When Mrs. C. returned she found the
monkey chattering on the mantlepiece,
and out crept the parrot, : looking deeply
injured, and greeted her with “We’ve had
a hell of a time.' 1 The appropriatenesl
ot tbe remark caused;a shout of laughter..
m
3,1873.
l§m
TAMES CALDWELL & CO
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Inrlte special attention to their.
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JUST OPENED.
IRISH AND FRENCH POPLINB,
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DR A DE FRANC MERINOS ,
EMPRESS CLOTHS AND SATEENS,
All the new shades
BLACK ALPACAS AND HOBAIR LUSTRES.
BLACK SILK WARP CASHMERES.
BMPRB3S CLOTHS AND MERINOS.
BLACK SILKS,
A very terse stock of all the best makes.
A LARGE STOCK OF
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At 91 per y<Md.
FONSON CELEBRATED
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BLACK SILK^ CLOAKS
CLOTS CLOAKS AND BACQUBS
In great varfety.
A large stock of Fashionable Fora, in medium and
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BLACK GUIPUE LACKS, BLACK THREAD
LACKS, BERTHAS AND CAPES.
Blankets and Flannels, ,
Cloth and cassimeres.
The above stock comprises the
FINEST IN' THE CJTY ,
Which w« offs r at the lowest market prlcee.
:: 3^^
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1873.
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LIFE IKSURANCE OOMPAXY,
TOLEDO, OHIQ.
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ORGANIZED in APRIL, 1872
*130,000.00.
Hon. W. W. JONES Hon. c. h, H RlßXga
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s. H. BERGEN,
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J. R. BWIGART,
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NOTES,
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PAID UP CAPITAL
BOARD OP DIRECTORS
J
’ <1 .
OFFICERS.
S, H. BERGEN, President.
F. J. KING, Vice President.
CHARLES COCHRAN. Secretary
J. F. ARIS, Assistant Secretary
W. W. JONES, Medical Exanaiuer
WILLIAM BAKER, Attorney
WILL ISSUE ALL TAB
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