Democratic watchman. (Bellefonte, Pa.) 1855-1940, December 23, 1921, Image 6

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    Bellefonte, Pa., December 23, 1921.
A GREAT RIVER, LITTLE KNOWN.
To those who read Dr. Eloise:
Meek’s description of her trip up the |
Yukon, the following from the Na- |
tional Geographical Magazine may be !
of interest:
The closing of the Yukon River to |
navigation because of ice, which oc-
curred in late October, serves the dou-
ble purpose of bringing annuaily to |
the attention of stay-at-home Ameri- |
cans one of the greatest of their riv-
ers, which to the majority is probably
little more than a name, and of warn-
ing of the southward thrust of the icy
fingers of winter which will soon |
grasp the shores and straits of the |
Great Lakes.
The Yukon, despite the general
failure to recognize it as such, is one
of the greatest rivers in the world,
says a bulletin from the National |
Geographic Society. It is more than |
2300 miles long and is both the long- |
est and the largest river flowing into |
Pacific waters in the Western Hemi-
sphere, surpassing by a considerable ;
margin its nearest competitor, the
Colorado.
North America the Yukon is surpass-
ed in length only by the Mississippi
system and the Mackenzie. It is long-
er than the St. Lawrence, as well as
all the other rivers, except the Miszis-
sippi system, which flow into the
Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic.
Though the discharge of the Yukon
has not been accurately measured, it |
is its tremendous volume of water
rather than its length that causes it
10 be ranked as a great river.
of course, far outdistanced by the
vast Amazon, greatest of rivers, and !
the Congo, which probably ranks sec-
ond. But the Yukon has been esti- |
mated to have three-fourths of the!
volume of discharge of the Mississip- |
pi, and if this estimate be accurate |
the stream which it pours into the sea
is probably among the half-dozen !
greatest in the world.
To Alaska, heretofore having no
highway of steel into its interior, the
Yukon has been indispensible. Be-
cause of the shallow bars at its
mouth, ocean steamers cannot enter
the river; but at the harbor of St.
Michael, just north of the mouth,
freight is transferred to shallow-
draught, stern-wheel river steamers,
which ascend the stream not only |
throughout the breadth of Alaska, but |
for several hundred miles into Cana-
a.
The Yukon, flowing through Alaska
roughly from east to west, divides the
territory into northern and southern
halves.
of the river and its tributaries, as well |
as at considerable distances from the !
stream, can thus be served by freight |
boats. The principal objectives of
the river steamers, how ever, are Daw- |
son, on the Yukon, about sixiy miles |
in Canada, and more than 1300 miles |
from the mouth, and Fairbanks, the |
“metropolis” of interior Alaska, near |
the head of navigation on the Tana-
na, a tributary of the Yukon.
The Yukon is an international riv- |
er, rising nearly 0500 miles within
Canadian territory, and sweeping in |
a great arc to the north and east. |
Although the river is over 2000 miles |
long, one of its sources, a small lake, |
is within twenty-five miles of the salt
. water to which it makes such a round-
about journey.
The existence of such a large river
as the Yukon in the Far North was |
long unsuspected. A Russian lieuten-
ant, Zagoskin, entered its mouth by |
boat in 1842
eral hundred miles.
company had discovered its head-
waters in Canada, but the two bits of |
Bitomation were not pieced together.
The existence of the river as a stream |
of great magnitude and length first |
became really known through the dar-
ing and romantic project of installing |
land telegraph wires between Ameri- |
ca and Europe across Alaska, Bering |
Strait and the wastes of Siberia. Rob-
ert Kennicott, in connection with this |
enterprise, blazed the Yukon trail by |
descending the river in 1865. The first |
trading steamer ascended the stream
in 1869. The Yukon really came into
its own with the discovery of gold in
the Klondike in 1896.
The Yukon is not alone in being a
great river which has remained in
comparative obscurity because of its
far northern situation. Just to the
east the Mackenzie, a brother stream
of hardly less magnitude, which is
now also beginning to feel the throt-
tling grip of frost, flowed almost un-
noticed through a little known wilder-
ness until the discovery of oil along
its banks brought it into the limelight.
And in the Eastern Hemisphere three
rivers, worthy to be classed among
the mightiest streams of the earth—
the Oba, the Yenisei and the Lena—-
pour hundreds of thousands of gallons
of water into the Arctic each second
in a mighty but losing battle against
the congealing power of cold.
The Hudson Bay |
BIRTHS.
Whitraan.—On November 23, to Mr.
and Mrs. Boyd C. Whitman, of Hub-
lersburg, a daughter, Ruth Beatrice.
White—On November 80, to Mr.
and Mrs. Roy Ellsworth White, of
Bellefonte, a daughter, Edna Jean.
Dorward—On November 29, to Mr.
and Mrs. Wesley C. Dorward, of
i a daughter, Miriam Ade-
ine.
Witmer—On November 12, to Mr.
and Mrs. Tester Witmer, of Belle-
fonte, a daughter.
Klinger—On November 17, to Mr.
and Mrs. William Klinger, of Belle-
fonte, a daughter, Pauline Mary.
Fultz—On November 24, to Mr. and
Mrs. George Fultz, of Spring town-
ship, a daughter, Hazel Ellen.
Breon—On November 29, to Mu.
and Mrs. Robert Breon, of Marion
township, a daughter, Marie.
Calderwood—On December 14, to
Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Calderwood, of
Bellefonte, a daughter, Sara Annabel.
emer meets
The best job work can be had at the
Among all the rivers of |
It is, |
Large areas along the banks |
and traversed it for sev- |
“Watchman” office.
Sli A TT RR NL YR SET
| FOR AND ABOUT WOMEN.
DAILY THOUGHT.
SANTA CLAUS
t If a body hears a prancing
i On the snowy roof—
| While she’s hanging Christmas stockings
| As of reindeer hoofs—
{ If they're coming near, and nearer,
She won't run, because
| She will know, this little lassie—
That it's Santa Claus!
if a body meets a body
With a jolly face,
PW hiie he's stuffing Christmas stockings
In the chimney place;
| 1e he's short, and stout, and rosy,
She won't run, because
| She will know, this little lassie—
That he's Santa Claus.
| Santa in the Kitchen.—Maybe you
| have never thought of kitchen things
| as making very Christmassy presents,
| but they impart the holiday spirit
quite as well as more poetic things,
| and make jolly and acceptable gifts.
| You can combine several in a com-
| ical way to hang on a tree, like Miss
{ Dolly Mopsy or, on the other hand,
you can tie each one up separately in
| gay paper and ribbon, so that the lady
who has six shining new pattypans |
handed down off the tree separately
| throughout the evening will become
the center of a heap of fun.
An amusing way to give a number |
of household things, which was prac-
ticed by one family of boys and their
father, was to put each object in its |
| native habitat, so that when the lady |
of the house went trotting about her |
household duties, the gifts burst grad- |
ually on her vision, and it was Christ- |
‘mas night before her presents came |
‘to an end.
Another entertaining way of giving |
| kitchen things would be to fasten to
the gift a little picture, possibly cut
from a magazine, with the gxpiAna;
‘tion that it was promissory of next
' month’s gift, and that a different pres- |
l ent for the house woulr surprise the |
recipient on the first day of every
month throughout the coming year.
For the young housekeeper, or the |
{little girl who is just getting old |
enough to help with the dishes, create |
, a mopsy doll. A dish mop forms the |
| head; a painted wooden mixing spoon, |
| the face; a dish towel, the body; al
| dustless duster, a skirt; and a woven |
| dishcloth, a shawl. A’ ribbon tied
| around the neck of the doll in front
| forms a collar and holds the whole |
thing together firmly.
| Tor the housekeeper who has diffi- |
| culty with her baking get a reliable !
{oven thermometer. This may be |
| dressed up in one or two oven cloths, |
{ to which you have sewed a brass ring
so that the cloth will always be on!
hand close to the stove for immediate |
| use just when it is needed.
| There's the five-inch spatula with |
| flexible blade for frosting little cakes
and scraping out small bowls and
cups; the broad spatula for flapping
griddle cakes, eggs, and fish, or for
| slipping unde corn bread or cookies;
! the six-inch spatula for scraping out
sauce pans and mixing bowls, an
creaming and spreading butter for
| sandwiches. A knife of all work is
the general utility knife with blade
; slightly tapering to a rounded end,
which, among its other accomplish-
' ments, cuts shortening into pastry;
| the cold-meat slicer, a narrow knife
i with a straight ten-inch blade; a small
! cleaver convenient for breaking up a
shin bone or chicken for soup stock;
! for steak, a carving knife with a six-
inch blade and sharp pointed end; a
' small knife with a three- inch blade for
| paring, oranges and grape fruit and
| [moving sections whole for salads
and desserts; and the French knife,
{ which is excellent for chopping small
portions of food.
Stainless steel knives for cutting
{ fruits and paring potatoes are a boon;
la fluted knife is desirable for cutting
| potatoes, cucumbers, and other vege-
| tables; a first-class knife sharpener
will not come in amiss. And speaking
of vegetables, why not select a set of
| attractive cutters for shaping vege-
| tables to be used in soups and stews
| and salads?
Mashed potato, whipped cream,
| frostings, mayonnaise dressing, cream
puffs, and lady fingers can be attract-
ively shaped if you own a pastry bag
! and rose and plain tubes.
Nothing could be nicer for the
housekeeper, if she hasn’t one already,
than an electric waffle iron; if electric-
ity is not available, an ordinary waffle
iron, or one of those made up of five
small hearts, is fine to use on Sunday
morning and for emergency desserts.
A heavy piece of canvas twenty-
eight by nineteen inches, and a knit-
ted cover to go over the rolling pin,
once used will always be used for roll-
ing out doughnuts, cookies and pastry,
and for kneading bread. A pastry
jagger for cutting pie crust and turn-
overs with fancy edges, and a rubber
set pastry brush for greasing pans
may go with the cover, also a glass
pie plate or little pattypans such as
you use in making lemon tartlets.
For the candy maker—a candy
recipe book, a thermometer, candy
dipper, nickel bars for cooling fudge,
a broad spatula, boxes of color paste,
bottles of flavoring.
Does anybody ever have an egg-
beater that works? If you have one
now it may not last. A set of three
—the baby size, the medium size, and
the large double egg beater—would
make a splendid present. If you in-
clude with this a wire whisk for mak-
ing smooth white sauce and batters,
it cannot be but popular. A set of
glass shakers to put on the shelf im-
mediately above the stove, to hold
cayenne, paprika, salt, and pepper will
be of assistance in making every day
dishes more palatable. A set of glass
kitchen bowls makes cooking process-
es attractive, and the glass baking
dishes, including a casserole, custard
cups and ramekin dishes, might be
added.
If your friend does not like to buy
ice cream, you might send an ice
cream freezer, an ice bag, and mallet
or ice pick, and one or more fancy
molds. If she entertains, she will ap-
preciate some new sandwich cutters,
or an angel-cake pan, timbale molds,
a ring mold, a charlotte russe mold,
and jelly molds of various kinds.
A jar of silver polish with squares
of cheesecloth, canton flannel, and a
piece of chamois skin makes a good
present,
=
=
| 200,000 WORKERS TO BE EMPLOY- |
| ED IN STATE HIGHWAY CON-
| STRUCTION UNDER FEDERAL
| HIGHWAY ACT.
| Construction of highways to the to-
| tal value of $76,400,000, covering 6,
{ 261 miles and employing more than |
| 150,000 workers, is about to be under-
| taken by 30 States, as the direct re-
| sult of the recent passage of the Fed-
‘eral Highway Act. This is the act
| which was recommended by the Pres- |
: ident’s Conference on Unemployment |
| as an emergency measure to provide
i jobs for the nation’s unemployed.
The figures as to the amount of
work which could be undertaken by
ways were supplied by the Governors |
in response to letters sent them by
Secretary Hoover. The letters asked |
what amount of work they could get:
after the passage of the act.
According to the act, which created
a fund of $75,000,000 to be apportion- |
ed among States taking advantage of |
al allotment.
is available now and part will be
| available January 1st. These amounts
| are of course in addition to the allot-
| ments received by States under the
| provisions of former Federal Aid acts. :
| Estimates show that $40,000 will be
| the average amount per mile expend- |
When the work is!
| ed by the States.
completed and approved by the Fed-
| eral inspector, the State will receive
| back from the government about $20,-
1 000 per mile.
How this State undertaking will af-
| fect the general condition of unem-
ployment can be estimated from the
replies received from Governors. Tex-
as can employ 13,500 workers on a
| $8,000,000 road-building job, covering
700 miles within the 90 days required.
Georgia can provide 9,000 men with
| | jobs on a $5,000,000 undertaking, cov-
| ering 360 miles of roads. Indiana can
| use 5, 800 men; Michigan, 5,600; Ohio,
5,300; North Carolina, 5,000; Minne-
i
the States in the construction of high- |
under way within a period of 90 days | |
the 90 days’ period, each State will be |
entitled to receive, on the basis of the
value of its work, its specified Feder- |
Part of this allotment |
PRR
| sota, 4,350; Louisiana, North Dakota,
"Sout Dakota and Mississippi, 4,000
each.
| Directly and indirectly, probably
| 200, 000 workers will be employed in
| state highway construction. This
| means that in addition to those direct-
i ly engaged in road building, there w ill
be a large number indirectly set to
' work providing material for the build-
‘ers. These will be employed in quar-
ries, cement mills, sand-banks, as-
: phalt plants, gravel-pits and shops
manufacturing road-building mater-
ials and tools.—The American City.
THE BUSY BEE.
Few people realize the enormous
effort required to make a single pound
| of honey. In a pound jar, the Man-
| chester Guardian tells us, there is the
concentrated essence of sixty thous-
and flowers.
To make a pound of clover honey
| the bees must take nectar from sixty-
! two thousand blossoms and make two
| million seven hundred thousand vis-
its in getting it. Often the journey
| from the hive to the flower and back
is as much as two miles, so that the
| making of a pound of honey requires
journeys that may aggregate more
than five. million miles. When we
know these facts, we realize that the
. bee is indeed “busy.”
State College Outing Club to Build
Cabins.
The Pennsylvania State College
student Outing Club is planning for
the building of several cabins in the
Seven Mountains and other points in
objectives for week-end hiking trips.
The club, which was organized for the
promotion of all outdoor sports and
activities, already has one cabin in
Huntingdon county, and despite win-
ter weather, it is being put to good
use. Members last week entered a
photographic contest for outdoor life
activities of the club.
—— Subscribe for the “Watchman”
| -
SCenlc
Theatre
Week-Ahead Program
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 24:
world gang
Also, Snub Pollard Comedy.
EDNA MURRAY and JOHNNY WALKER in “PLAY SQUARE.”
(Cut this out and save for reference).
Under-
pits themselves against a boy’s love for his mother and girl.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 26 (Matinee and Night):
to win the favor of the other.
uth’s Vod-a-Vil.
“HOUSE OF WHISPERS.”
band. A lavish production.
tery drama in six reels of mystery
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28:
done by this star.
Show.”
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29:
very lavish in its display.
an opium den. A wonderful film.
Aesop’s Fables.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30:
with a woman hating author.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31:
EILEEN PERCY in “HICKVILLE
actress.
MARIE PROVOST in “NOBODY'S FOOL.”
pleasing performance with excellent photography and backgrounds, being
a story of an heiress who flees from fortune hunting suitors to fall in love
Also, the 5th episode of “MIRACLES OF
THE JUNGLE,” the greatest animal play ever produced.
country tests her lover by going to New York and playing part
Also, Snub Pollard Comedy.
ANITA STEWART in “PLAYTHINGS OF DESTINY,” a six reel strong
dramatic story well played; being problem of a girl forced by one husband
Extraordinary.
Also, Pathe News, Span-
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27 (Big Double Show):
LOUISE GLAUM in “LOVE MADNESS.”
“Love Madness” is a
preys on villian’s weakness and extracts confession of murder to free hus-
“House of Whispers” is a well sustained mys-
J. WARREN KERRIGAN in
six reel story of wife
and suspense. A very good show.
CONSTANCE TALMADGE in “WEDDING BELLS,” a six reel story of a
young wife who divorces her husband because he objects to bobbed hair,
but remarries him to keep others off. A very amusing light comedy well
Also, 2-reel Sunshine Comedy, “Singer Midget’s Side
MAE MURRAY in “IDOLS OF CLAY,” a seven reel photo extravaganza
The star appeals in a daring dance.
Innocent
South Sea island girl follows sweetheart to London who finds her in
Also, Pathe News, Pathe Review and
This beautiful star gives a
TO BROADWAY,” a story of girl from
of an
OPERA
MONDAY, DECEMBER 26:
al comedy, “LET ME EXPLAIN.”
she knew what love was. Cast:
HOUSE.
MARION DAVIES in “THE RESTLESS SEX,” Robert Chambers’ famous
story of a woman's craving for excitement.
Good. Also, 2-reel education-
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, DECEMBER 30 AND 31:
GLORIA SWANSON in “SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT,” Cecil de
mille’s great masterpiece, being the intimate life of a woman who thought
Theo Roberts, Elliot Dexter, Monte Blue,
Julian Faye and Theo Kosloff. Also, 2-reel Larry Lemon Comedy.
Don’t forget, matinees daily at Scenic.
country—all these
and cheaply.
Handling Your Funds.
A Business Manager who disburses
funds at your direction, a secretary
who keeps your accounts, a sleepless
sentinel guarding your funds, a
rier who delivers to all corners Sof the
fices are performed by the bank.
Money which you wish to send with-
in this city or to distant points is con-
your check simply, safely
The checking account is only one of
the vicinity of the college campus as.
the many mediums through which this
bank serves its customers. There are
many other ways in which we can be
helpful to you and it would be our
pleasure to serve you in any or all of
them.
CENTRE COUNTY BANKING CO
60-4 BELLEFONTE, PA.
C
| and many other of-
: veyed by
AAAI NIL IPA LSA ASS SPSS
A errata ere -
rather than fewer abandoned farms in
the State and we will face rural deca-
dence rather than rural progress.”
Caldwell & Son
BELLEFCNTE, PA.
Plumbing ana Heating
By Hot Water
Vapor
State will have to depend more and
more upon food hauled long distances
at added cost. There will be more,
Attention
Farmers
This is the time to fat-
ten your hogs for Fall
There is Nothing Better
Than Fresh Skinimed Milk
Our price only 25c. per
Steam
Pipeless Furnaces
meme
Tull Line of Pipe and Fittings
AND MILL SUPPLIES
ten-gallon can.
ALL SIZES OF
‘Terra Cotta Pipe and Fittings
i
Western Maryland Dairy
Bellefonte, Pa.
66-24 tf ail ~ ¢
: ‘Estimates Cheerfully and Promptly
Furnished. 1-99
ANCE]
WHERE ane WHAT |=
72 BUY
ERAT
=
EE
=
==
=
=
5
Cad
AINTY and practical Gifts are
ost acceptable at Christmas.
We are showing an unusual line
in Silver, Bronze, Cut Glass and Pot-
tery Novelties from which you can
select a Gift that will have lasting
value and usefulness for anyone.
Come in and look them over.
F. P. BLAIR & SON
JEWELERS
BELLEFONTE, PA
SS — ————————
Jl
=
om
Make
The
Fauble Store
Your Christmas Store
EVER in the Store’s histo-
N ry have we shown so
many Useful Things that Aen
and Boys need and appreciate
as you will find here now.
Everything that man or boy
wears is here and in by far the
largest Assortment in Central
Pennsylvania.
Prices, we know, are the
lowest you have known for
five years.
Make Faubles Your Christ-
mas Store and you will be
Happy.
A TFAUBLE
ARES