Democratic watchman. (Bellefonte, Pa.) 1855-1940, May 01, 1896, Image 3

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.made.
FARM NOTES.
verely when set out in their locations and
the roots should also be carefully trimmed.
It is of no advantage to allow bruised or
dead roots to remain.
—Farmers cannot afford to experiment
except incidentally, on asmall scale. The
experiment stations were instituted to
make a business of experimenting, “and
they are doing a good work.
—As there will be quite an amount of
refuse rakings at this season, especially
when preparing for the garden, fire should
be used to destroy such. By so doing
many insects and their eggs will also be
consumed. .
—Manure lasts longer than fertilizers,
but it is because the plants derive the use
of but a portion of the manure annually,
as it dissolves slg@vly and only as it decom-
. For~imfmediate results fertilizers
are much better than manure.
—One of the best modes of using Paris
green in the dry form is with flour, as it
sticks better, and is not easily washed off
by a light rain. It is best to pick off the
beetles that come early, if possible, apply-
ing Paris green only when it becomes nec-
essary.
—Farmers buy fertilizers for nearly all
crops grown on the farm except fruit. It
is important to feed the orchard as it is to
do so for grain crops. When a tree pro-
duces a large crop of fruit it performs a
heavy work, and it must also, every year,
grow new wood and leaves.
—Now that warm weather has come it is
a waste of food to give grain to poultry, as
the fowls can secure all the food needed by
them. Should the hens become very fat
they will not lay, and are then also liable
to diseases which usually result from over-
feeding during warm weather. 2
Foot rot in sheep has deterred many
farmers from keeping large flocks. It may
always be traced to damp ground. Where
hillsides are given over to sheep foot rot
seldom appears. Lack of shelter is also a
source of disease, for when a sheep takes
cold it seems to recover very slowly.
—Some dairymen declare that ‘‘sun-
shine has a good deal to do with the full-
est flow of milk ; also with its quality.”
One man gives each cow of his herd an ex-
tra quart of meal night and morning in
cloudy weather in order to satisfy his cus-
tomers. This experience is a significant
one and ought to be effective against dark
stables.
—When the land is plowed toa great
depth the air, moisture and warmth enter
and the crop is advanced more rapidly than
when only the surface soil is loosened.
With good drainage to carry off the mois-
ture in excess the soil not only absorbs
warmth, but retains it. With too much
moisture there is constant evaporation,
which causes a loss of warmth.
—Upon the fitting of the collar depends
much of the work done by the horse.
While a collar may not cause sores, yet it
may bejvery uncomfortable. The collar,
and also the harness, should be made to fit
the horse perfectly and whenever the day’s
work is done the animal should be thor-
oughly examined in order to discover any
ill effects from the use of the collar.
—We hope to see the boy who is to be a |
farmer go to an agricultural school and fit |
himself for the business, the same as the
boy who is to be a doctor goes to a school
of medicine. And we believe that farmers
would better devote their energies to se-
curing laws that will help make agriculture
profitable than to try to make this change
in public school methods.
—TIt does not pay to feed too much corn |
to sheep. Some of the sheepmen of Mich-
igan are reported to have made this mis-
take the past winter. Having a large
quantity on hand they fed it out freely to
sheep, giving them in addition little be-
sides straw. The digestive systems of the
sheep were deranged to such an extent that
the mortality in the flocks was great.
—All who have made rose bushes a spec-
ialty know that they require clean culti-
vation and rich soil, yet the large majority
of those who procure young rose bushes
put them on the borders of grass plots,
which result in their destruction. Begin-
ners with roses should consult with ex-
perienced persons before selecting the va-
rieties, as some kinds will only thrive
under special conditions.
—Skim milk for calves is not their nat-
ural food. The whole milk, containing
the fat, is nature’s provision, and when the
calf is deprived of the carbonaceous matter
in the milk it will not thrive. Linseed
meal is used by some with the skim milk,
but results show that a gruel composed of
linseed meal and oatmeal, added to skim
milk, is an excellent substitute for the
whole milk.
—This is an excellent time to make the
hills for tomato plants... Diga hole two
feet square and a foot deep. Fill it full of
manure and cover well with dirt. When
ready to put out the plants spade up the
whole hill, incorporating manure and dirt
intimately. The manure will have de-
composed and will be in excellent condi-
tion for plants, and a space of four feet
square should be spaded with which the
manure should be mixed. -
—Orchardists should make themselves
familiar with the more important common
insects. Farmers should be on the alert
for new insects in their orchards, and if
they do not know them it is an easy mat-
ter to send them to the entomologists of
the experiment stations for information re-
garding their habits and injurious pro-
clivities. An ounce of preventive is better
than a pound of uncertain cure.
—1It is the early potato crop that pays,
because prices do not fall very low until
estimates of the yields of late crops are
The growing of potatoes is a mat-
ter on which but little new light can be
thrown, as farmers have made potatoes a |
specialty for centuries. But progress in
potato growing has been made, however,
as in other crops, and it is incumbent on
every farmer who must meet competition
to endeavor to not only increase his yields
but also at the same time keep the soil in |
fertile condition. There are also varieties |
coming to the front every year, and the en- |
terprising farmer must endeavor to be |
thoroughly informed in regard to their |
merits. Just which of the many varieties |
can be claimed as the best depends upon
the soil and location, being determined
only by practical experiment upon each
farm. The prolific kinds may be late and
the earliest varieties may not yield as pro-
fusely as those that are later.
Streets Paved With Gold.
Prescott, the capital of Arizona, boasts
that it is the nearest approach to the New
Jerusalem, as described in the Bible, as its '
streets are being paved with gold. The
granite used for pavements contains $4 in |
gold and 20 cents in silver to every ton,
|
|
. | 80 that in time, when less expensive meth- |
—Young trees should be cut back se- |
ods of reducing ores are used, it may pay !
the city to tear up and crush its street pave-
ments.
Tustors.—Fibroid, Ovarian and other
tumors, cured without resort to surgery.
Send 10 cents in stamps for book. Address,
World’s Dispensary Medical Association,
Buffalo, N. Y. ,
Announcements.
The following are the prices charged for announce-
ments in this column : Congress $10.00 ; Assembly
$8.00 ; Sheriff $8.00; Treasurer $8.00: Regis-
ter $6.00: Recorder $5.00 ; Commissioners $5.00.
All candidates are required to pledge themselves to |
abide the decision of the Democratic county conven- |
tion.
CONGRESS,
We are requested to announce Col. J. L. Spang-
ler, of Bellefonte, as a candidate for Congress, su
ject to the decision of the Democratic county and
district conventions.
LEGISLATURE.
We are authorized to announce James Scho-
field, of Bellefonte, a candidate for the nomina-
tion for assembly, subject to the decision of. the
Democratic county convention.
We are authorized to announce Robert M. Fos-
ter, of College township, candidate for the nomi-
nation for assembly, subject to the decision of the
Democratic county convention.
We are anthorized to announce A.C. Thomp-
son, of Half Moon township, a candidate for the
nomination of Assemblyman, subject to the decis-
ion of the Democratic county convention.
SHERIFF.
We are authorized to announce James 8. Carson,
of Spring township, a candidate for nomination
for sheriff, subject to the decision of the Demo-
cratic county convention. !
We are authorized to announce R. C. Gilliland, |
of Snow Shoe township, a candidiite for the nomi- |
nation for sheriff, subjeet to the decision of the |
Democratic county convention.
We are authorized to announce Geo. E. Parker,
of Philipsburg, a candidate for the nomination for
sheriff, subject to the decision of the Democratic
county convention. |
We are authorized to announce W. M. Cronister, |
of Worth township, a candidate for the nomina- |
tion of sheriff, subject to the decision of the |
Democratic county convention. {
We are authorized to announce G. H. Leyman, |
of Boggs township, a candidate for the nomina-
tion of sheriff, subject to the decision of the
Democratic county convention.
|
i
i
We are authorized to announce the name of Ja- |
|
1
|
cob L. Runkle, of Bellefonte, a candidate for the
nomination for sheriff, subject to the decision of
the Democratic county convention.
We are authorized to announce Burdine Butler,
of Howard township, a candidate for the nomina-
tion for sheriff, subject to the decision of the
Democratic county convention.
We are authorized to announce John Noll, of
Bellefonte, a candidate for the nomination for
sheriff, subject to the decision of the Democratic
county convention.
We are authorized to announce Joseph A.
Emerick, of Walker township, a candidate for the |
nomination for sheriff, subject to the decizion of
the Democratic county convention.
COMMIRSIONER.
We are authorized to announce Daniel Heck-
man, of Benner township, a candidate for the
nomination for county commissioner, subject to
the decision of the Demoeratic county conven-
tion. * |
We are authorized to announce Geo. R. Wil- |
liams, of Worth township, a candidate for the !
nomination for county commissioner, subject to |
the decizion of the Democratic county conven-!
* i
| tee,
Henry Heaton, a farmer of Boggs township, |
presents his name as u candidate for county com-
missioner, subject to the decision of the Demo- !
cratic county convention. ’
We are authorized to announce W. H. Williams,
of Worth township, a candidate for the nomina-
tion for commissioner, subject to the the decision |
of the Democratic county convention.
We are authorized to announce P. H. Meyer, of |
Harris township, a candidate for the nomination |
for county commissioner, subject to the decision |
of the Democratic county convention. - |
We are authorized to announce William H. Fry, |
of Ferguson township, a candidate for the nomi- |
nation for county commissioner, subject to the |
decision of the Democratic county convention, |
We are authorized to announce Daniel C. Grove, |
of Walker township, as a candidate for county i
commissioner subject to the decison of the Demo- |
cratic county convention. x
We are authorized to announce the name of Jac-
ob Bottorf, of College township, a candidate for |
the nomination of county commissioner, sub-
ject to the decjsion of the Democratic county con- |
vention. |
We are authorized to announce Jos. L. Neff, of
Boggs township, a candidate for the nomination
for county commissioner, subject to the decision
of the Democratic county convention.
RECORDER.
We are authorized toanno®nce A. R. Alexander,
of Penn township, Centre county, Penna., as a,
candidate for the nomination for Recorder, sub-
ject to the decision of the Democratic county con-
vention. °
We are authorized to announce Frank Foreman,
of Centre Hall, a candidate for the nomination for
Recorder, subject to the decision of the Democrat-
ic county convention.
TREASURER.
We ure authorized to announce that Frank Bow-
ersox, of Ferguson township, will be a candidate
for county treasurer, subject tothe decision of the
Democratic county convention. ¥
We are suthorized to announce Fred Kurtz, of
Centre Hall, a candidate for the nomination of
treasurer, subject to the decision of the Demo-
cratic county convention.
We are authorized to announce Calvin A. Weav-
er, of Haines township, a candidate for nomina-
tion for county Treasurer, subject to the decision
of the Democratic county convention.
We are authorized to announce James Kimport,
of Harris township, a candidate for nomination
for treasurer, subject to the decision of the Demo-
cratic county convention. *
REGISTER.
Bellefonte, Pa., March 31, 1896.
Ep. Warcumax :(—Please announce my name as
a candidate for the nomination for the office of
Register and C. O. C. of Centre count, y, subject to
Democratic rules. G. W. RUMBERGER.
PT IS
Business Notice.
Children Cry for Pitcher’s Castoria.
.When baby was sick, we gave her Castoria,
When she was a Child, she cried for Castoria,
When she became a Miss, she clung to Castoria,
When she had Children, she gave them Castoria.
New Advertisements.
No RHEUM
and Eczema cured, These two complaints are so
tenacious that the readers of the WATCHMAN
should know of the success obtained by using Dr.
Kennedy's Favorite Remedy. Where all other
treatments have failed, it has made a complete
cure.
No more horrible case of salt rheum was ever
reported than that of Wilbur L. Hale, quartermas-
ter, Pratt Post, G. A. R., Rondout, N. Y. Several
physicians utterly failed to render any relief;
finally o
DR. DAVID KENNEDY'S
FAVORITE REMEDY.
was tried and steady improvement followed its
use, and a permanent cure resulted.
It is used with similar success in cases of scrof-
ula, nervousness, kidney and liver complaints,
and in all diseases brought about by bad blood and
shattered nerves, 41-18-1m
-selling at 5c. per yard ?
Cottolene.
<
MAKE A PIE
SE
Shorten it with Cottolene instead of lard and see what a crisp
crust it will have ; how delicious and wholesome it will be. Pie
made with Cottolene will do a dyspeptic good. Do everybody
good because it is good.
There is only one secret in cooking
with Cottolene—use but two-thirds as much as you would natur-
ally use of lard. Follow this rule and Cottolene will do the rest.
Gienuine is sold everywhere in time with trade-marks
—“Cottolenc and steer’s head in cotton-plant wreath— on
every tin. Made only by
EE ————
THE N, K. FAIRBANK, COMPANY, CHICAGO and 132 N. Delaware Ave., Philadelphia.
40-31
TE —
Schomacker Piano.
TT TTT IIIT
Goons uns
THE RECOGNIZED
+
+
STANDARD PIANO OF THE WORLD,
ESTABLISHED 1838.
SOLD TO EVERY PART OF THE
PREFERRED
THE - GOLD
STRINGS
' ness of touch.
GLOBE.
BY ALL THE LEADING ARTISTS.
Emit a purer sympathetic tone, proof against atmospheric action
extraordinary power and durability with great beauty and even-
Pre-eminently the best and most highly improved
instrument now manufactured in this or any other country in the world.
—— HIGHEST HONOR EVER ACCORDED ANY 'MAKER——
Su-iro-¥ ‘UNANIMOUS VERDICT.
1851—Jury Group, International Exposition—1876, for Grand, Square, and Upright
mailed on application.
Pianos. ‘
Illustrated catalogue
SCHOMACKER PIANO-FORTE MANUFACTURING CO.
WARER®OMS: 1109 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.
12 East Sixteenth Street, New York.
145 and 147 Wabash Avenue, Chicago.
41-14 1015 Olive Street, St. Louis.
Our Advertisements
Always *
Mean Bargains.
Te GLOBE. |
eee ieee eerie remit
Katz & Co. Limited.
Excelling, Eclipsing
Unmatchable,
Unrivalled.
DRY GOODS AND MILLINERY
By patronizing our establishment you will reap a double satisfaction ; firstly in the |
merits of the articles themselves, and secondly in paying the lowest possible price at
which such high class goods can be bought.
Not one word that we say in our advertise-
ments would be of any consequence but for the fact that we back up every statement we
make with piles and piles of merchandise.
confidence of the public.
of promises that are fulfilled to the letter.
We produce all we advertise and keep the
Our weekly announcements are statements of facts—a making
....... THERE ARE MANY THINGS IN THIS ADVERTISEMENT FOR YOU.......
3 BIG BARGAINS AS A STARTER.
200 dozens Ladies’ Vests, all sizes, good quality,
during Spring sale 5c.
125 dozen Ladies’ Fast Black Hose, sold else-
where at 10c., our price per air 5c.
83 dozen Men's Working Socks, the biggest val-
ue ever known, per pair 5c.
EMBROIDERIES.
We have stacks upon stacks of Embroideries.
Did you take notice of the quality of those we are
ANOTHER SNAP IN HANDKERCHIEFS.
We received this week 3,245 Handkerchiefs,
among them some of the very finest quality made.
A slight imperfection in each one, scarcely notice-
able. If absolutely perfect there are a great many
in the lot that would sell at 75c. each. These we
put on sale to-morrow morning; 1 dozen to each
customer at 12c.
2 SNAPS IN CAPES AND SKIRTS.
Here is something that you cannot afford to
miss. apes in black, blue, and tan; a regular
$1.50 quality, we will sell you cheaper than you
can make them. A limited number, your choice
for 98c. ; also a good assortment of silk and wool
Capes in prices ranging from $1.25 up to $12.75.
(2) A fine figured Sicilian Skirt, any length desir-
ed, full width, for $1.19. Now, can you afford to
make one when we set this price on them ?
LADIES’ SHIRT WAISTS.
Made of the fines fasity of percale, latest style
and finish, for 48c. e have alsoa good selec-
tion of blue and black at 58¢c.; same godds ¢an-
not be duplicated elsewhere at 75c.
Persian Patterns made with the new Bishop
Sleeve.
Don’t forget to take a peep at these.
A SPECIAL OFFERING IN KID GLOVES.
A fine genuine Kid Glove, all colors, looks like
a dollar quality, feels like a dollar quality, and
wears like a dollar quality. We have a limited
number and will close out the lot at 69c. per pair.
DRESS GOODS.
We have a full line of all classes of Dress Goods,
yard wide ; you will pay 25c. for the same material
elsewhere, our price 17c. per yard. Colors to se-
lect from— black, cardinal, garnet, brown, tan,
drab, green, slate, old rose, light blue and navy.
Plaids that others ask you 10¢. for our price 6e.
“" “ “ . “ 15¢ “" ““ ““
. 10c.
“ “ “ “ 6; “hop. se “ 13c.
“ “ ‘ “ “95a, 4 “ 15c.
“ “ “ “ “ ghe, 4 “ 9B0.
“ “ “ “ “ [a .“
60c. 48c,
and the finest line of all-wool, silk and wool, and
silk and linen Plaids ever shown in Bellefonte,
and at prices that defy eompetion.
10c.
. Florida Water per bot-
NOTIONS.
Curling Irons He.
Thimbles 1c.
Door Knobs 2c.
Looking Glasses ic.
Tracing Wheels 5c.
Egg Beaters 3c.
Coffee Strainers 5c.
Gum Hair Pins lc.
Linen Thread 4c.
Shoe Blacking 5c.
Kid Curlers per pack
be.
Lead Pencils 1c.
Scales 10c.
2-foot Rules 8c.
1-foot Rules 6c.
Thermometers 19¢.
Knives and Ferks per
Belt Pins 2¢
set 48c.
i Combs 40. = Pen Knives 5c.
Base Balls 5c. oe Can Openers 5c.
Chinese Iron Wax 4c. Sagas, extra quality,
Match Safes Ge. : Toa 10c.
hela | i Sie ere or
Fond Nose on so, | Safety Pins 3c.
Shawl Straps _10c. Dress Stays por pack.
1 dozen Shirt But- | (orget Steels se.
Christie Bread Knives Wilting Paper, 1 roam
19¢. Child's Jumping Rope,
Te so
ac ns per box de. a, :
"Pooth Bruslies 3c. Slate Pencils, per doz.
3c
Blacking Brushes 9¢. : ilk Soa
Clothes Brushes 10c. Dinsermie vet Lg
Scrub Brushes 5c. Clothes kets large,
$ large 10c.
-49c.
White-wash Brushes Saxony, all colors, 5c.
10¢.
. Mucilage, per bottle 4c,
Curry Combs 10c. :
Varig Tos kny is, | ShdS host of cers
Ammonia, pint bottle mention.
tle 12¢c.
A&%5-Our Notion Counter is visited by nearly
every customer that enters our store. The people
have learned that they can purchase almost any-
thing new in Household Notions at a saving of 25
to 50 per cent. on hardware and drug store prices.
MISCELLANEOUS.
Yard-wide Bleached | Fine Silesia per yd. 8c.
Muslin per yd be. Curtin Scrim per yd 5c.
Yard-wide Unbleached | Good Shirting p'r yd 5c.
Muslin per yd. 4}c. Men's Heavy Overalls
Red Table Linen per
wi 19¢;
ite Table Linen per
yd. 25c.
Good Calicoes per yd.
48c.
Men’s Heavy Shirts 25¢
Good Suspenders Jc.
Celluloid Collars 8c.
Fine Percale Shirts 0c.
Belt Buckles 10c.
Shirt Waist setts 9c.
c.
Dréss Ginghams (fine)
Side Combs per pair 5c.
per yd. 6c.
WASH FABRICS.
In Dimities and other Wash Fabrics wé lead the procession.
styles of Figured Dimities to select from, at prices
Tasso Silk—new wash fabric ; looks like
silk ; our price per yard 10c.
Just think of over 60
ing from 8c. to 25¢c.
silk, feels like silk and wears better than
Bon Ton Crepe—another new wash fabric, and shown only at ‘The Globe.” We
o
have it in all colors, per yard 12c.
We also have a very pretty line of Plain and Figured Ducks at prices ranging from
10c. to 15c.
Linen Batiste, the latest novelty of the season, in plain colors, 8c., 10¢., 12¢ and 15c.
a yard. In figures, 10c. and 15¢. a yard.
‘We have the most complete line of Silkaline ever shown in Centre county ; also all
other materials for fancy work, such as Figured Denims, etc.
Big line of Percales, sold elsewhere for 12c., our price 9c.
WE SELL GOODS CHEAPER THAN ANY STORE IN BELLEFONTE, BUT FOR
CASH ONLY.
40-15
KATZ & CO. Lid.
Makers of Low Prices and Terrors to All Competitors.
“ »
=,
Saddlery.
$5,000 $5,000
— WORTH OF——
HARNESS, HARNESS, = HARNESS,
SADDLES
and FOR SUMMER, ——
- BRIDLES
—NEW HARNESS FOR SUMMER,—
| FLY-NETS FOR SUMMER,
DUSTERS FOR SUMMER,
WHIPS FOR SUMMER,
All combined in an immense Stock of Fine
Saddlery.
renner NOW IS THE TIME FOR BARGAINS......
ee
To-day Prices
| have Dropped {
L—
THE LARGEST STOCK OF HORSE
COLLARS IN THE COUNTY.
JAMES SCHOFIELD,
BELLFONTE, PA,
New Advertisements.
rpae ACCIDENTS OF LIFE.
Write to T. S. QUINCEY
Drawer 156, Chicago, Sec-
THE retary of the Star Accr-
. pENT CoMPANY, for informa-
STAR ACCIDENT tion regarding Accident
i Insurance. Mention this
COMPANY. paper. By so doing you
: can save membership fee.
Has paid over $600,000.00 for accidental injuries.
i
NO MEDICAL EXAMINATION REQUIRED.
40-47-8m
+
T
Be Your Own Agent
OURT PROCLAMATION.— Whereas
the Honorable J. G. Love, President Judge
of the Court of Common Pleas of the 49th Judicial
District, consisting of the county of Centre and
the Honorable Corlis Faulkner, Associate Judge
in Centre county, having issued their precept,
beanie date the 1st day of April to me directed
for holding a Court of Oyer and Terminer and
General Jail Delivery and Quarter Sessions of the
Peace in Bellefonte, for the county of Centre and
to commence on the 4th Monday of April, being
the 27th day of April, 1896, and to continue two
weeks, notice is hereby given to the Coroner, Jus-
tices of the Peace, Aldermen and Constables of
said county of Centre, that they be then and there
in their Jropst persons, at 10 o'clock in the fore-
noon of the 27th, with their records, inquisitions,
examinations, and their own remembrance, to do
those things which to their office appertains to be
done, and those who are bound in recognizances
to prosecute against the prisoners that are or shall
be in the jail of Centre county, be then and there
to prosecute against them as shall be just.
iven under my hand, at Bellefonte, the 1st day
of April, in the year of our Lord, 1896, and the
one hundred and nineteenth year of the inde-
pendence of the United States,
JNO. P. CONDO,
41-14-4¢ Sheriff.
A RUINED
GOWN
Is generally the result
when inferior dress shields
are used. The only cer-
3
tain remedy is ?
CANFIELD DRESS SHIELDS.
We agree to replace any dress damaged by per-
spiration when the Canfield Shield has
been properly attached.
Ask for and insist upon
having “Canfield Dress
Shields.”
CANFIELD : .
RUBBER COMPANY,
New Yurx,
LoxpoN AND Paris.
For sale by: dealers, everywhere, and in Belle-
fonte by
THE NEW RACKET, and EDWIN F. GARMAN.
41 16 4t
ASSIGNEES SALE
re)
VALUABLE FIRE BRICK PROPERTY.
In pursuance of an order of the Court of Come
mon Pleas of Centre county, Pa., the well known
William R. Miller Fire Brick Property, situated
at
SANDY RIDGE, PA.
Will be exposed to public saleon the premises,
on the Tyrone and Clearfield Branch of the Ty-
rone division of the Pennsylvania Railroad com-
pany, on ;
“TUESDAY, MAY 19tH, 1896.
at 11 o'clock a. m.
This property consists of certain real estate sit-
uated in Rush township, Centre county, Pennsyl-
vania, and contains about :
‘374 ACRES OF FIRE CLAY LAND,
from which the celebrated William R. Miller fire
brick were manufactured, and has thereon erect-
ed a
VALUABLE PLANT—
for the manufacturing of fire brick,
RESIDENCE HOUSE, 3¢ TENEMENT HOUSES,
1 STORE ROOM AND DWELLING COM-
BINED, OFFICE,
and other buildings, etc., etc., as per detailed des-
eription of the premises to be read at the sale.
Terms :—Ten per cent to be paid in cash when
the property is knocked down, the balance of one-
half the amount bid to be paid in cash upon con-
firmation of the sale by the Court, and the remain-
ing one-half of the bid to be paid within six
months after confirmation with interest thereon
at the rate of six per cent per annum, said defer-
red Joyinent to be secured by bond and mortgage
on the premises, the sale and confirmation nisi
to be returned and made on Tuesday, the 2nd day
of June, 1896, said sale to be made subject to the
payment by the purchaser of the taxes on the
premises for 1896.
There will also be exposed to public sale at the
same time and place a
LOT OF PERSONAL PROPERTY
consistin,
rows, tools, mine-wagons, two carts, and one
wagon, ete., office furniture and appliances, in-
cluding desks, chairs, stoves, safe, letter-press
and files, ete., fogether with all other personal
property on or about said premises belonging to
the assigned estate of William R. Miller. %
Terms of sale of personal property :—Cash, to be
paid at time of sale, upon delivery of personal
property. .
JOHN BLANCHARD,
Assignee for the henefit of creditors of the es-
tate of William R. Miller, Bellefonte, Pa. 41.16-5t
A MATTER OF GREAT
IMPORTANCE TO YOU
IN SUFFERING FROM LONG STANDING
CHRONIC DISEASES, DISEASES OF THE
BLOOD, SKIN AND NERVGUS SYSTEM,
AS WELL AS THOSE SUFFERING
: FROM
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT
TROUBLE.
MORITZ SALM, M. D., Specialist,
Von Grafe Infirmary,
COLUMBUS, OHIO.
—WILL BE IN—
BELLEFONTE, PA.,
—AT—
THE BROCKERHOFF HOUSE,
——SATURDAYS— _
April 18, May 16, June 13, July 11, Aug.
8, Sep. 5,,0ct. 3-31, Nov. 28-30,
Dec. 26-28.
ONE DAY ONLY.
EXAMINATION AND CONSULTATION
FREE TO EVERYBODY.
UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIALS
Deafness, Ringing Noises and Cattarrh Cured by
Dr. Salm !
For a long time-f-noticed that I became grad-
ually harder and harder of hearing. Ringing
noises came in the ear after a while, and 1 be-
came very much alarmed. So I'went to Dr. Salm
and put myself under his care and to-day Iam
grateful to state, and for the benefit of those who
may suffer in a fike manner, that I can hear once
again as good as ever, and those infernal noises
have disappeared, although IT am pearl? 60 years
old. Dr. Salm said all of it was caused by catarrh :
. B. Buck.
Spring Mills, Centre Co., Pa.
A Lady 69 Years Old Cured of Catarrh and Deaf-
ness.
Some years ago I contracted catarrh and it went
to my ears. Gradually I became worse and ny
ears began to trouble me very much, my strength
began to give out, and 1 came weaker and
weaker =o that I was not able to work. I®took
treatfnent from several of our doctors in the
1 county, but somehow they couldn't do me apy
good ; so I went to see Dr. Salm. He promised’to
cure me, and I dare say, he kept his word, for to-
day I am again stout and healthy as could be ex-
pected of any one of my age, 69 years, and I find
that I got ‘value received for my mney paid to
the doctor. Mags. Javon B. FiNLey.
Brush Valley, Indiana Co., Pa.
Thought His Time Hod Come but was Cured by Dr.
Salm.
For some years I have been suffering very much
with various ailments and broke down at last. I
suffered most excrutiating pain from head to foot
all the time. My stomach troubled me a good;
deal, liver and kidneys as well were out of order ;
in fact, I thought my time had come. The doctors
couldn’t do me any good ; patent medicines had
no effect ; so I went at last to Dr. Salm, and after
a course of treatment, I am now again as hail and
hearty and strong as ever. F. L. CONFER.
Warriors Mark, Huntingdon Co., Pa.
Serofulons Limb of 8 Years Standing Cured.
For the last 8 years I have had fearfully sore
limbs ; they would swell and break openand run;
iving me «a world of trouble, and making me un-
fit for my daily labor. I have had four doctors
trying to cure me, but they couldn’t do it. At
last I went to Dr. Salm, who made a perfect and
complete cure, and I feel as if I could enjoy life
once more. EpiTH V. GUTHRIE,
Kittaning, Armstrong Co., Pa.
Growth Removed from the Eye Ball by Dr. Salm.
For 10 years my wife Susanna, had somethin,
growing oh her eyes, making her almost blind.
r. Salm performed an operation, and made a
perfect success, as she can now again thread the
finest needle, and read the finest print, and her
eyes do not give her the least trouble. It was a
fine piece of work. Jonx BERGEN,
Holsopple, Somerset Co.; Pa.
Granulated Lids Cured by Dr. Sal.
For the last four years I have been troubled
very much with granulated eye lids; it gid
blinded me. Doctors here did me no Food, t also
seemed to affect my general health. Dr. Salm has
cured me. I can again see splendidly, and feel
better than ever.
Indiana, Pa., Dec. 5th, 1804.
Brssir THOMAS,
After Total Blindness Made to sek by Dr. Salm.
‘About one year ago my brother accidentally hit
me in my left eye, with a bow-gun. I beganto get
blind rapidly in that eye, and in a short time,
couldn't see anything out of it; total blindness
was caused by the hurt. I heard so much of Dr.
Salm's wonderful success in his eye operations,
that I went to him, and he has once more proven
his wonderful skill on my eye. For to-day, after
having been totally blind, I can see splendidly out
of the same again. Joseer HENRY,
Stulton; Somerset, Co., Pa.
March 28th, 1895.
Case of Stomach and Inward Trouble Cured by Drs
Salm.
For some months I have been feeling miserably,
on account of stomach and private trouble. I was
always afraid to eat, and.the ni in my stomach
and chest was tegrible, but after a term of treat-
ment, I feel now, once more, as good as ever, |
can eat everything again, without trouble, thanks
| to Dr. Salm’s wond erful treatment,
Tueresie DEveacH,
| Dunlo, Cavbria Co., Pa.
of presses, press-moulds, wheel-bar- |
comnhinications” to box 760,
| Columbus, O.
OUR ADVERTISEMENT WILL APPEAR TWICE
BEFORE EACH VISiT.
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