Democratic watchman. (Bellefonte, Pa.) 1855-1940, March 28, 1890, Image 3

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    Se ——————————
Deora Wada
Bellefonte, Pa., March 28, 1890.
Farm Notes.
Cattle already infested with lice
should be thoroughly carded and wash-
-ed with warm soap water in which a
little kerosene has been added.
Do not turn sheep or any other
kind of stock upon the pasture too
early. Give it a chance to get a start.
The, early grass is not very nutritious,
either.
Mr. E. W. Reid, a correspondent of
the Ohio Farmer,says he would as soon
put on his overcoat before winter as to
mulch fruit trees before the ground
freezes.
Mr. W. Davis,of Canada, after favor-
ing the Berkshire breed for many years
is reported as now preferring the large
Yorkshire, owing to the public prefer-
ence for leaner pork.
An agricultural expert says it is bet-
ter to have a cow give 300 pounds of
butter per year for five yearsand die on
your hands than to give 200 p@nds
for ten years and then make 1500,
pounds of old cow beef.
If one farmer does not feel able to
purchase and keep a thorough-bred
boar himself, in many cases it-would
pay to combine with three or four of
his neighbors and secure a good an-
imal rather than continue to breed to a
scrub.
Keep your breeding pure, whatever
it is. Do not mix blood unless you
do it intelligently for a special purpose.
If you make a cross, do not make it
‘with bloods too wide apart that they
cannot readily coalesce. You want har-
mony, not antagonism, in breeding.
Half a teaspoonfull of fresh white
hellebore to a common wooden pail of
water is about the right proportions
for currant worms. This sprinkled
upon the bushes when worms first ap-
pear will make short work of the
worms. An ordinary watering yot
will do the work.
Feeding an animal on only one in-
dividual food is very unwise, for it is
bound to be a food not well balanced.
A mixed ration not only supplies a bet-
ter balanced food but is much more ap-
petising, and, what is better relished, is
very apt to give better results as a
food.
A proper selection of cows for your
herd is a very important consideration,
but important as it is, it will not in
the end prove of half the consequence
that the proper selection of a bull will.
On the blood you breed depends the
success of your future herd.
Odors in the stable indicate that {the
air therein is impure. The use of ab-
sorbents, with due regard to keeping
the stalls clean, is very important.
Once a week the stable should be
sprinkled with a solution of copperas
in two gallons of soft water.
A flock will never have its standard
raised by hap-hazzard breeding. When
men can make money without the
slightest expenditure, except in thought
and care—as they can by judicious
breeding—and don’t do it, the conclu-
sion is that they don’t want to make
money.
Mr.Joel Richardson, of New Port,
says he has increased the average yield
ot his wheat in the last five years eight
bushels per acre by light applications
of commercial fertilizer at time of sow-
ing. His average for that time has
been twenty-eight bushels per acre.—
Maine Farmer.
All atonce dies a fine, fat lamb.
Its mother was fed on timothy. Dis-
sect it, and the chances are that you
will find in its bowels long threads or
rolls likejvermicelli, Its mother’s hay-
made milk was sodry that it turned to
strings in the intestines and could not
move on.—Sheep Breeder.
Millet is an important crop, and
should be grown more extensively, As
soon as the warm days come on is the
time for seeding. The ground may be
plowed early in the seasou and well
manured, as millet thrives best on
rich soil. Tt grows very rapidly, and
yields a large crop of hay in a short
time.
Poultry houses are not usually infest-
ed with lice in winter unless a number
of hens are hatching, and if the nests
are not kept very clean the pests from
the bodies of the hens will be very fa-
vorable to the increase. It is from
the setting hens asa rule that poultry
houses become stocked with lice.
If you want a paying dairy do not
breed anything. Ifyou do you will ac-
complish about as much as the man
who fires at random expecting to kill
all the game. When you breed breed
for something. Aim at some idea of
excellence, using proper means, and
you will be pretty sure of improvement.
A small cow that is a heavy milker
requires as much food as a large cow.
If-you don’t believe it, read the state-
ments regarding the amount of
food consumed by Jersey cows during
the butter tests, and compare them
with the amount consumed by Holsteins
under similar conditions. It will as
tonish you.—New Jersey Agricultur-
ist.
J. M. Smith, the Green Bay market
gardener, raised last season 1650 bush-
els of merchantable potatoes on four
acres of land measured off by the Coun-
ty Surveyor, besides 80 bushels of
small potatoes. He says there were
spots that yielded at the rate of 600
to 700 bushels per acre. He does not
think much of plot estimates.
E. Weid, in the Ohio Farmer, seys a
pear tree which blooms, but bears no
fruit, is making too much root growth,
and recommends digging a trench
eighteen inches deep to be dug below
the circumference of the first branches,
filling it half full of comjost manure,
and then returning the soil on top.
This will check root growth and start
the tree to bearing.
No Angels in Theirs.
Early last summer a New Englander
moved out to a small town in Arizona
and announced his intention of open-
ing up a first class grocery. He had a
number of bills posted up dwelling par-
ticularly on the fact that the business
was to be square and above board. Just
as he was getting ready to open shop a
deputation of citizens waited on him
and asked the newcomer if the state-
ments on the placards were made in
good faith.
“You mought as well give us the
hull truth about this thing,” said the
leader. “You mean to say there hain’t
going to be no water in the vinegar ?”’
“That's what I mean, sir I’ replied
the stranger, a little surprised. “Nor
no sand in the sugar 1”?
“Ain’t they goin’ to be no beans in
the coffee 1”?
“Most decidedly not, sir !”
“Nor chicory, nuther ?”’
“Never, gentlemen ; I give you my
word for it.”
The crowd seemed nonplussed for a
moment, and the leader held a short
consultation, at the end of which he
turned and said :
“Say, stranger, we've concluded that
you air a suspicious character. But
firstlet me ask you if your cigars are
goin’ to be loaded —with cabbage, you
know ?”
“Not while I"’——
“That’s all we wanted to know. We
gin you twenty-for hours to leave town,
an’ you better leave. When we're in
need o’ angels we'll drop you a postal
card. Good day, stranger,” and the
deputation filed out.—American Gro-
cer.
I RS
What to Teach Boys.
A philosopher has said that true edu-
cation for boys is to ‘teach them what
they ought to know when they become
men.’
To be true—to be genuine. No edu-
cation is worth anything that does not
include this. A man had better not
know how to read—he had better never
learn a letter in the alphabet—and be
true, genuine in intention and in action
—rather than be learned in all sciences
and in all languages, to be at the same
time false in heart and counterfeit in
life. - Above all things, teach boys that
truth is more than riches, more than
earthly power or possessions.
To be pure in thought, language and
life—pure in mind and body.
To be unselfish, To care for the feel-
ings and comforts of others. To be po-
lite, to be just in all dealings with others.
To be generous, noble and manly. This
will include a genuine reverence for the
aged and things sacred.
To be self reliant and self-helpful even
from childhood. To be industrious, al-
ways, and self-supporting at the earliest
proper age. Teach them that all hon-
est work is honorable, and that an idle
life of dependence on others is dis-
graceful,
‘When a man has learnad these things
—when he has made these ideas a part
of his being—however poor, or however
rich, he has learned the most important
things he ought to know when he be-
comes a man.
HE Dip Nor Pursuk THE SurJsrct.
—*“Madam,’" said the turnpike tourist at
the kitchen door, as he coughed a re-
spectful cough and removed something
at looked like a hat from his head,
*‘you will pardon me tor asking if the
grateful odor that comes from the meat
cooking on your stove is not that of
fried ham ?”
“It is, sir,” replied the large swarthy
woman with the projecting teeth, plac-
ing her arms akimbo and planting her-
self squarely in the doorway. “Have
You any other questions to ask ?”’
“None at all madam,” said the pil-
grim, as he backed out toward the gate.
“None at all. I merely wished to grati-
fv a natural feeling of curiosity. I
thought it must be bam. I find my
conjecture was correct. Thatis all. I
have the honor, madam, to wish you a
good day.”
Be —
——Hoops kirts again may come into
style, but 1t is hoped not. The transfor-
mation which will bring back that style
of crinolines ought to be indefinitely
postponed. Transtormations in the
health of thousands of women through-
out the country have taken place durin
the past few years. Pule, haggard, an
dispirited, they have become bright-eyed
and healthy. The secret ? Dr. Pierce's
Favorite Prescription, which cures all
those chronic “weakness” and distress-
ing ailments peculiar to women.
RR TERA ATS CE
BeEFsTEAK PIE. —A savory dish, and
one that suits those fond "of simple
seasoning, is a beefsteak pie. Cut two
pounds of the under side of the round
into small cubes, cover with cold water
and simmer gently until tender. Sea-
son with salt, pepper, thicken the
gravy slightly, and it’ not rich enough
add a piece of butter. Put the meat
and gravy in a deep baking-dish, cover
with a thick layer of white potatoes,
boiled in salted water, mashed with the
addition of a piece of butter and some
milk, and then beaten to a cream. Beat
an egg very light, pour over the pota-
to, and baked until a rich brown. An
onion sliced thin and stewed with the
meat improves the flavor for some tastes.
It is important in stewing or “boiling”
meat or fowl to remember that gentle
simmering at 180 degrees cooks the meat
quite as quickly and in a much more
savory manncr than furious boiling at
212 degrees.
+ —————
It is a curious fact that the body is
now more susceptible to benefit from
medicine than at any other season.
Hence the importance of taking Hood's
Sarsaparilla now, when it will do you
the most good. Tt is really wonderful
for purifying and enriching the blood,
creating an appetite, and giving a heal-
thy tone to the whole system. Be sure
to get Hood's Sarsaparilla, which is pe-
culiar to itself.
—
Nor every person knows that the
sure test of genuine paper currency is to
hold the bill up to the light, so that
you can discern two lines running paral-
lel across its entire length. These are a
red and a blue silk thread inside the pa-
per. No counterfeit has them.— New
York Tribune.
He Looks Like Wanamaker.
One of the most striking cases of fa-
cial resemblance in public life is that of
Congresman Goodnight, of Kentucky,
and Postmaster General Wanama ser.
Mr. Goodnight was in the house res-
taurant drinking a glass ot the famous
beverage of his state, when an elderly
and spectacled man approached him
and exclaimed :
“Why, Mr. Wanamaker, what are
you doing ?”
“Simply taking a drink of whisky,”
said the congressman.
“Then—tlien you drink whisky, Mr.
Wanamaker?” gasped the old gentle-
man.
“Why, certainly.”
The stranger lifted his band in holy
horror, and apparently overcome by the
discovery, muttered that “the folks up
in Philadelphia won't believe it when
I tell ’em,”* and moved away.
“That is the only way in which I
can get even with Wanamaker for
looking like me,” said Mr. Goodnight.
“This is the third or fourth time I have
been mistaken for the postmaster gen-
eral while taking a drink, and I have
not exerted myself very much to cor
rect the mistake. But I suffer through
the resemblance of our faces fully as
much as Mr. Wanamaker does. People
mistake me for him, and fail to ask me
to take something with them.”’— Ohica-
90 Herald.
TS RETR.
A Slick Article.
How a Horseman Took in a Couple of
Drummers.
If I live to be 1,000 years old I
shall never forget how a stranger took
five of us in one day at Syracuse, N.
Y., in a manner so slick that he walk-
ed off with our cash before we had a
guspicion, says a writer to the New
York Sportsman. It was a rainy, dis-
mal aftnrnoon, and a dozen—agents,
drummers, drovers and others—were
sitting about the office. Some one
read a newspaper clipping about a
bigamist who had seven wives, and
pretty soon each one had an opinion
to advance. Finally a well-dressed
good-looking man ventured the observ-
ation :
“I myself could have married a doz-
en women on a hour's notice. It's
all in the first impression created.”
Some agreed and some differed, and
the discussion began to assume a more
vigorous tone, By and by the same
man again observed :
“You may think me conceited, gen-
temen, but I'm only telling you what
I know I can do. I've always had ex-
traordinary luck with women. T'll
venture to say that I can go down to
the depot, pick out the best-looking
woman in the waiting-room, and if not
already married, that I can take her to
the parson’s inside of an hour.”
There was a grand laugh at this,
but he looked serious as he continued :
“Perhaps this crowd has some money
to lose on that ? If so, let's talk busi-
business.”
After a bit we came to an understand-
ing. Five of us were to chip in $100
each against $500 of his money. We
were to go to the New York Central
depot and select a female, and if she
proved to be unmarried he was to per-
suade her into marriage inside of one
hour or forfeit his money. We coul
have raised $1.000 as well as half that
amount, but he could not cover it.
Nine of us went to the depot. Among
the waiting passengers were seventeen
females, but on looking them over our
choice was limited to three. We final-
ly selected a woman we believed to
be a widow. She was fairly
handsome, well-dressed, and had two
parcels on the seat beside her. We got
seats near by and then our masher ap-
proached. He asked what train she
was going out on, spoke about the
weather, and, to our surprise, was not
rebuffed. Within ten minutes he had
asked her if she was a widow, and she
had scarcely answered in the affirma-
tive when he began to plead his case.
It was only forty minutes by the watch
when he came over to us and said :
“Gentlemen, I'd like two or three of
you to accompany that iady and my-
self to the parson’s as witnesses to our
marriagz.”
We went and they were duly married
and the stakes passed over. The lady
acted as coy and shy and embarrassed
as you please, and confessed that it was
a case of love at first sight. They took
a train two hours latter, and when they
were fairly off we learned that he was
a horseman from Chicago and that the
woman had been his lawful wife for the
past fifteen years.— Cleveland Plain
Dealer.
A EH RSS
The Elephant Nurse.
In India, where the elephant is treat-
ed by his mahout almost as one of the
family, the grateful animal makes a re-
turn for the kindness shown it by
voluntarily taking care of the baby. It
will patiently permit itself to be mauled
by its little charge, and will show great
solicitude when the child cries. Some-
times the elephant will becomeso attach-
ed to its baby friend as to insist upon its
constant presence. Such a case is known
where the elephant went so far as to re-
fuse to eat except ia the presence of its
little friend. Its attachment was so
genuine that the child’s parents would
not hesitate to leave baby in the ele-
phant’s care, knowing it could have no
more faithful nurse.
Rick WarrLes.—Rub through a
sieve one pint of warm boiled rice, add
to it a tablespoonful of dry flour, two-
thirds of a teospoonful of of salt, two
teaspoonfuls of baking powder. = Beat
separately the yelks and whites of
three eggs; add to the yelks three gills
of milk ; work it into the flour; then
add an ounce of melted butter; beat the
whites of the eggs thoroughly ; mix the
whole together.” Heat the waffle iron
and grease it evenly—a piece of salt |
pork is best for this purpose; pour the
batter into the half of the iron over the
range until nearly two-thirds full ; cover,
allow to cook a moment, then. turn and
brown slightly on the other side.
INuminating Oil.
|
Hardware.
New Advertisements.
nowy ACME.
—
THE BEST
It gives a Brilliant Light.
It will not
It will Not Char the Wick.
It has a High Fire Test.
It does Not Explode.
We stake our reputation as
IT IS THE BEST OIL IN
BURNING OIL
* THAT CAN BE MADE
FROM PETROLEUM.
Smoke the Chimney.
It is without an equal
AS A SAFETY FAMILY OIL.
refiners that
THE WORLD.
Ask your dealer for it. Trade supplied by
ACME OIL CoO.,
ARDWARE AND STOVES
H ?
eA Toe
lo——JAS. HARRIS & C0O."S——
AT
|
|
! LOWER PRICES THAN EVER.
NOTICE—Thanking our friends for
their liberal patronage, we desire to ex-
press our determination to merit a con-
tinuance of the same, by a low scale of
PRICES IN HARDWARE........... .
We buy largeiy forcash, and doing our
own work, can afford to sell cheaper
and give our friends the benefit, which
we will always make it a point to do.
—A FIRST-CLASS TIN SHOP—
CONNECTED WITH OUR STORE.
ALL OTHER THINGS
DESIRABLE IN HARDWARE
FOR THE WANTS AND USE
OF THE PEOPLE, WITH
PRICES MARKED SO THAT
ALL CAN SEE,
0—AT LOWEST PRICES—o
34 35 1y Williamsport, Pa.
For sale at retail by W. T. TWITMIRE For Everybody.
0—JAS. HARRIS & CO.,—o
22 BELLEFONTE, Pa.
Printing. Printing.
I hls JOB PRINTING.
ya
Fine Job Printing. Fine Job Printing,
Fine Job Printing. Fine Job Printing.
Fine Job Printing. Fine Job Printing.
Fine Job Printing. Fine Job Printing.
Fine Job Printing. Fine Job Printing.
Fine Job Printing. Fine Job Printing.
Fine Job Printing. Fine Job Printing.
rel dL TUE
FINE JOB PRINTING}
me
Fine Job Printing: Fine Job Printing.
Fine Job Printing. Fine Job Printing.
Fine Job Printing. Fine Job Printing.
Fine Job Printing. Fine Job Printing.
Fine Job Printing. Fine Job Printing.
f Fine Job Printing. Fine Job Printing.
Fine Job Printing, Fine Job Printing.
(
—[AT THE WATCHMAN OFFICE, So
A EESTI ——
Carriages.
ARGAINS! o
—In—
AND
0 McQUISTION
We have on hand and
you a choice o
wheels. Our work is the
this section, made by
and of good material.
who ever served an
the business. Along
ties.
from other places; so
Surries, Phaetons, ug,
Wagons, Buckboards, or
you.
We are prepared to do
oO
on short notice.
Woodwork and Smithing.
elsewhere. Don’t miss
alongside of the freight d.
34 15
best assortment of Carriages,
and Spring Wagons we have
We have Dexter, Brewster, Eli
and Thomas Coil Springs, with Pi
and Liisa ape] bodies, and can give
the different patterns of
BARGAINS
o CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, o
SPRING WAGONS, |,
at the old Carriage stand of
& CO.,———
NO. 10 SMITH STREET,
adjoining the freight depot.
for sale the
Buggies,
ever had.
tic,
ano
best made in
ood workmen
e claim to be
the only party manufacturing in town
apprenticeship to
with that we have
had forty years’ experience in the busi-
ness, which certainly should give us
the advantage over inexperienced par-
Inprice we defy competition, as we
have no Pedlers, Clerks or Rents to
pay. We pay cash for all our
thereby securing them at the
figures and discounts. We are aeter-
mined not to be undersold, either in
our own make or manufactured work
ive us a call for
00ds,
owest
gies, Spring
anything else
in our line, and we will accommodate
all kinds of
REPAIRING——o0
Painting,
Trimming,
We guaran-
tee all work to be just as represented,
80 give us a call before
urchasing
the place—
epot.
8. A. McQUISTION & CO.
Saddlery.
EW AND SECOND-HAND PI-
anos, Organs and Sewing Machines,
on reasonable terms. Secondhand instruments
in some cases good as new, for sale or rent,
Payments taken in monthly installments
ROOM 28, Crider's Exchange 3rd floor.
34-493m
EN WANTED ON SALARY—
To reliable men we will give steady
employment and liberal salary paying their
traveling expenses. We grow our own stock
exclusively and guarantee it to be strictly
first-class in every particular, true to name as
ordered. Ful instructions urnished. Experi-
ence unnecessary. Apply at once stating age.
Address E. C. PIERSON & Co. Maple Grove
Harseries, Waterloo, N. Y. (Establ’d over20y’rs.)
-9-16w,
ALESMEN WANTED.—To sell
our 600 hardy varieties of choice Nur-
sery Stock. Best specialties. No experience
necessary. Special advantages to beginners.
Extra inducements, Pay weekly. Situation
permanent. Best terms. Best outfit free. We
guarantee what we advertise. Address, at once,
GLEN BROS, Nurserymen,
Rochester, N. Y.
(This house is reliable.) ;
35-10-2m*
Sg ALDEMEN WANTED.
400 ACRES. 37th YEAR.
To represent one of the largest Nurseries in
the country. We guarantee satisfaction to all
customers. No preyious experience necessary.
Salary and expenses from start, Address,
stating age,
HOOPES, BRO. & THOMAS,
able Avenue Nurseries West Chester, Pa.
ee
HRESHING MACHINES. — A
_Specialty. Simple, most durable,
economical, and perfect in use. Wastes no
grain ; cleans it ready for market,
THRESHING ENGINES
and Horse Powers. Saw Mills, Shingle Ma-
chines, Hay Presses, and Standard Imple-
ments generally.
Send for illustrated Catalogue.
A. B. FARGUHAR CO., Limited
Pennsylvania Agricultural Works,
35-7-3m York, Pa.
DMINISTRATOR’'S NOTICE.—
Letters of administration on the es-
tate of Nancy Cochran, late of Ferguson town-
ship, deceased, having this day been granted
to the undersigned, by the Register of Wills
in and for Centre county, all persons indebted
to said estate are requested to make immedi-
ate payment, and persons having claims
against said estate are requested to present
the same duly authenticated for settlement.
Sur CHARLES SNYDER,
Administrator,
HASTINGS & REEDER, Afty’s
A LARGE MARBLE ANDGRAN-
3
ITE FIRM.
— HEISLER & GROSS, —
the new marble firm of
largest and the finest lot o
MONUMENTS & TOMB STONES
ever seen in Bellefonte or in the State, except
Philadelphia. One member of the firm re-
cently went to the quarries in Vermont and
bought two car loads of which has arrived with
Shont sisi vo styles of Monuments & Grave
stones. They were bought at such low prices
that it #s impossible for any firm to compete
with. Head stones, that were selling at fifty
dollars are now thirty, and all the rest are as
low in proportion. Do not buy of any person
or firm until you have seen our stoc and i
styles, for they are grand. There are several !
grades of them and consist of the following
named marble, Italian, Southern Falls, Rut-
land, Creole, Kennesaw, Cherokee, and also
ail kinds of Granite.
HEISLER & GROSS,
Water street near big s ring,
Bellefonte.
Slistonte have the
35-10-4t
pure UNITED STATES
—WASHING MACHINE,--
MANUFACTURED ONLY BY
M. BROWN & CO,
WAPAKONETA O HI
—
THE BEST WASHER IN THE MARKET.
No screws or nails are used in its construet-
ion, the whole machine is held. together with
steel rods, so adjusted as to take up any shrink«
age. It is the most durable machine made. No
sheet iron to rust, no cogs or costly parts to
break or wear out.
AGENTS WANTED EVERYWHERE.
A~Send for circulars and price lists with
full Description.
For SALE BY
McCALMONT & CO.,
35-11-3m*
Bellefonte, Pa.
USAT.
gp
A GOOD RECORD.
THE OLDEST HARNESS HOUSE
IN TOWN.
Over 18 Joars in the same spot—no
change of firm—no fires—no going back,
but continued and steady progress. This
is an advanced age. People demand more
for their money than ever before. We are
up tothe times with the largest and best
assortment of everything that is to be
found in a FIRST-CLASS HARNESS
STORE, and we defy competition, either
in gral . Suni or prices. NO SEL-
ING OUT FOR THE WANT OF TRADE.
VO COMPANY— NO PARTNERS — NO
ONE TO DIVIDE PROFITS WITH BUT
MY CUSTOMERS. I am better prepared,
this year, to give you more for your monoy
than ever before. = Last year and this year
have found me at times not able to fill m
orders. The above facts are worth consid-
Sings for they are evidence of merit and
Shir ealing. There is nothing so success-
u
0—AS SUCCESS—o
and this is what hurts some. See my
large stock of Single and Double Harness,
Whips, Tweed Dusters, Horse Sheets, Col
lars and Sweat Pads, Riding Saddles,
Ladies’ Side Saddles, very low: Fly-Nets
from $3 a pair and npuArds, Axle, Coach
and Harness Oils, Sa dlery Hardware and
Harness Leather SOLD AT THE LOW-
EST PRICES to the trade. Harnessmak-
ers in the country will find it to their ad-
vantage to get my prices before purchas-
ing hardware elsewhere. I am better pre-
pared this year than ever to fill orders
promptly.
JAS. SCHOFIELD,
Spring street, Bellefonte, Pa.
8 ad
33 37
Hi rmas BOOK
[Established 18
| prepared to
of all descriptions,
Special attention given
and manufacture of BLANK
Orders will be received at
dress 3
Book Binder, Third and
25 18
1
52.]
Having the latest improved machinery J am
BIND BOOKS AND MAGAZINES
or to crenind old JDooks,
to the ruling of paper
BOOKS, pape
this office, or ad-
F. L. HUTTER
Market Streets,
Harrisburg, Pa.
—— senna
inde UR NEW $85 SOLID GOLD
Book Bindery, WATCH FREE,
Paya pln Baskin Famine world.
erfect timekeeper. arrante €avy, SOLID
BINDERY. comp hunting cases. Both ladies’ and gent's
sizes, with works and cases of equal value. Ong
PERSON in each loca ity can secure one free, to-
ether with our large and valuable line of
OUSEHOLD SAMPLES. These samples, as well as
the watch are free. All the work you need do
is to show what we send you to those who call
—your friends and neighbors and those about
you—that always results in valuabie trade for
us, which holds for years when once started,
and thus we are repaid. We pay all express
freight, etc. After you know all, if you woul
like to go to work for us you can ‘earn from
$20 to 860 per week and upwards. Address,
STINSON & CO., Box 812, Portland,iMe. 35 1.
Miscellaneous.
J EBRUARY 1st 1890,
THE ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS & MANI-
TOBA RY. and its branches became the
GREAT NORTHERN RY. LINE.
IF YOU ARE GOING
TO THE FREE FARMS OF THE MILK
RIVER VALLEY,
TAKE THE
GREAT NORTHERN RY. LINE.
TO THE GOLD, SILVER, COPPER, IRON
AND COAL MINES OF MONTANA,
TAKE THE
GREAT NORTHERN RY. LINE.
—
TO HELENA, BUTTE, SPOKANE FALLS
AND THE COAST CITIES,
TAKE THE
GREAT NORTHERN RY. LINE.
TO FARGO, CROOKSTON, GRAND FORKS
AND WINNIPEG,
TAKE THE
GREAT NORTHERN RY. LINE.
TO ALL MINNESOTA, SOUTH DAKOTA
NORTH DAKOTA, MONTANA, IDAHO,
OR EG ON, WASHINGTON,
CALIFORNIA AND
MANITOBA
POINTS,
TAKE THE
GREAT NORTHERN RY. LINE.
For tickets, maps and guides, apply to your
home ticket agent or write to
F. I. WHITNEY,
Gen. Pass. and Ticket Agent,
GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY,
St. Paul, Minn.
Ay-The GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY
LINE runs its own Magnificent Dining Cars,
Palace Sleeping Cars, Special Apartment Cars
and Free Colonist Sleepers on Daily Through
Trains. 359 1y \
we