The evening telegraph. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, May 26, 1871, FOURTH EDITION, Page 2, Image 2

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    TilE DAILY KvjSNINc TELEGBAPH PHILADELPHIA, FKIDA F, MAY 2G, , 187 1.
SrililT OF TEE MESS.
IDITOBIAL OPINIONS OF THE LEADINO 70CBNALS
UPON CUBRKNT TOPICS COMPILED XVEBT
DAT FOB THS EVENING TELEGRAPH.
CANADIAN ANNEXATION.
From the . T. Sun. I
The lojal subjects of Great Britain in
Canada are generally resting under the dela
tion that their country is much coveted by
their American neighbors, and that the latter
are only awaiting a pretext for attempting a
forcible annexation of their territory to the
United States. In this they are greatly mis
taken. Our conn try is large enough for the
present; in fact, it is too large to be well
governed nntil we get an administration a
good deal wiser than the one now in power.
Nevertheless, annexation will finally be ac
complished, and that result will come to pass
mainly through the efforts of the Canadians
themselves. Already there are many active
and earnest advocates of annexation in
Canada; and unless some extraordinary and
unexpected change in the condition of the
two countries should ocour, the number of
these must steadily increase. The reason for
this stale of things is very simple. In the
United States business is brisk and remune
rative, and the value of property of all kinds
is constantly increasing; while on the other
side of the line, with a very few looal excep
tion, trade is stagnant, labor is poorly paid,
and real progress is almost unknown.
Nothing will more plainly shew the differ
ence in the actual condition of the inhabi
tants of Canada and the United States than
a comparison of the state of affairs existing
in places on each side of the line possessing
similar natural advantages. Take Portland
and Quebec, for instance. The former city
was almost burned to the ground a few years
ago; now it has been rebuilt with much more
elegant and costly buildings than it previously
possessed, and is one of the most thriving
cities in America. Mechanios command hign
wages, and all is life and prosperity. Quebec,
on the other hand, is surrounded with very
valuable water power which is not applied to
any useful purposes, and has a direct trade
with Europe, and every facility for an im
mense lumber trade. But the city is bank
rupt; it cannot collect taxes enough to pay
the interest on its debt. Business of every
kind is dead; the mass of the people are
miserably poor; there is but little demand
for labor; and the industrial classes, when
they find employment at all, are compelled
to work at starvation prices. Ship carpen
ters in Quebec get from forty to sixty
cents a day.
Just as marked a contrast is to be observed
between the towns of Ogdensburg and
FreBCott, the first on the American and the
other directly opposite on the Canadian Bide
of the St. Lawrence river. Ogdensburg is
full of busy manufacturing establishments,
and evidences of thrift and enterprise are
manifest in every direction. Cross to Can
ada, and one finds a sleepy old town that ap
pears as if it had indulged in a Kip Van
Winkle slumber for the last half century.
So at Windsor, opposite Detroit; although
so near to one of the most busy and enter
prising cities of the Western States, it seems
as if the boundary line had proved an im
pregnable barrier to enterprise and publio
spirit.' Trade is dull, real estate sells at
ridiculously low figures, and farmers may be
Been hawking their produce around for mere
nothing. At St. John, below St. Albans, on
the Chamblay river, where within a circuit of
twelve miles may be found a water power
more than equal to that of Lowell, Man
chester, and Lawrence combined, lands and
bouses can be bought for a mere song. In
the villages of St. John and Chamblay com
fortable houses, with a garden attached, can
be rented at from twelve to eighteen dollars
a year. A few weeks ago a farm of two hun
dred acres of land, partly improved, in Maid
stone township, Canada, lying within sight
of Lake St. Clair, and but one mile from a
station on the Great Western Railway, was
sold at publio sale for twelve dollars an acre.
Land in Grosse Point, on the American
shore, directly opposite, is worth one hundred
dollars an acre, not because it is any richer
land, but because it is within the United
States.
Now this state of things cannot last forever.
The spirit of loyalty to the British Crown is
strong in the average Canadian, but his in
herited love of roast beef is stronger. Thou
sands of Canadians are emigrating to the
United States every year; twenty-five hun
dred passed through St. Albans recently in
a single week. Great numbers of Canadians
fiock;to our manufacturing town? for employ
ment during the winter months, many of
whom return to Canada in the summer.
Every one of these is a missionary in the
cause of annexation. The office-holders, the
pensioners of the British Government, and
the wealthy traders who are gradually getting
into their possession the lauds and property
of the poverty-stricken inhabitants, will con
tinue intensely loyal; but the desire for an
nexation to the United States will so spread
. among the masses as to form before many
years a wave of publio opinion which it will
be impossible for the loyalists to resist. In
the mean time we can afford to wa'.oh the
progress of events with entire equanimity.
ABSURDITIES IN OUR CRIMINAL
COURTS.
From the N. Y. Tribune.
After several hours' deliberation, whioh we
are compelled to suppose was serious and
mature, but which we arre disposed to suspect
from the character of the jury was not pro
found, the j urors sitting in the Foster case were
unable to reach any conclusion as to his guilt
or innocence, or the degree or his on ending.
This hesitation in framing a verdict in a case
where the facts of the murder were so clearly
established and undisputed, and the malioe
and premeditation of the murderer so clearly
apparent, would appear very remarkable but
for two or three circumstances developed
on the trial. Besides affecting this present
issue, in which all New York is so
deeply interested, these developments
serve to illustrate some of the many
absurdities of that jury system which was
once the pride ot the law and the palladium
of libertv. but which corrupt practice in the
courts has made a disgrace to the law and
dangerous to the safety, if not the
libeitv of the people. These remarks are
UDDlicable to dozens of other trials lately
iifM in this community, and, indeed to the
common and corrupt practice now generally
in this State.
Tn tVia first dace, the court has gone delibe
ti tn work to secure the most ignorant
and negative characters posnible as jurymen
to decide between this man and the people.
Some have said that it does not follow that
because a man happens, us these jurors pro
fess, to be ignorant of the cirou instances of
this particular bomwidt, that they are laokiug
in general intelligence. But it does follow,
as a very natural conclusion. The case was
one of great atrocity; it waa the talk of the
city for Jays; it wan detailed ait length in all
the daily papers, and commented on for
several days after its occurrence. To confess
ignorance of the facts as told in the papers
is to admit virtually tnat one does not read
the daily journals habitually: and
how many men of average intelligence,
fit to sift facts from opinions and conjec
tures, able to decide upon right and wrong
in matters of fact and law, neglect their daily
journal? If we are to oonsider the Foster
jurors men of average intelligence, the an
swer is about one in a hundred, for we be
lieve somewhat more than one thousand citi
zens were summoned before the present jury
was selected. The proportion is not flatter
ing, certainly. If their order of intelligence
was not shown to be low by the examination
which they underwent, theirindecision of
character was clearly proven. Not one of
them answered the questions put to them
with clearness and ponitiveness. They were
certain only of their ignorance and imparti
ality. It is usually supposed that men of in
telligence are less open to prejudices than
ignorant ones; but the law, nnder present
practices, construes knowledge to include
prejudice, and trusts its exposition to the
most incapable whom it is possible
to drum up. The prejudices
of positive men are much to
be dreaded, but who would not rather trust
them, if honest and intelligent, than men of
such negative dispositions that they side
with the last artful lawyer who addresses
them ? The law which requires that jurors
Bhould be ignorant of the facts of the case to
be brought before them does not demand
that they should never have heard or read of
it. They could not, perhaps, legally be
jurors if personally cognizant of the facts,
but the hearing or reading of them need not
disqualify any man, for it is folly to suppose
that an intelligent juror cannot separate in
his mind the legal and valid testimony he
hears on trial, and the narrative whioh he
may have read in the papers. Certainly an
unintelligent one could not; and, therefore,
the greater reason for elevating the standard
of jurymen, instead of lowering it, as the
present legal practices tend.
Having selected the most ignorant jurors
attainable, the next proceeding of the Court
is to mystify and confound them as much as
possible. They are chosen at .random; they
are generally as ignorant of law as of fact,
and have to depend for the former on the
Court as completely as on the witnesses for
the latter. A long course of legal study is
deemed necessary to qualify a judge to ad
minister the law in matters of property
merely; but twelve men without speoial
legal training, and sometimes without a good
common-school education, are supposed to be
competent, after once hearing the law stated,
to dispense justice in matters of life and
death. This seems the height of absurdity;
and so, it would seem, skilful lawyers
consider it, for they never fail to com
plicate their weakest causes by obtaining
a multiplicity of charges by the Court.
For instance, the facts were plainly put
before the jury in the Foster case. There
was no chance to distort them; and few men
with common sense and that .intuitive know
ledge of justice possessed by all persons how
ever ignorant of law, would have long hesi
tated over them. But the skilful counsel of
the prisoner submitted to the judge, and
through him the jury were charged upon, not
less than twenty-three points of law. In
many of these the nioe distinctions between
what is law and what is not were stated after
a style which would have puzzled the best
read lawyer in Judge Cardozo's Court, and
must inevitably have confused any man of
average intelligence unread in criminal law.
We have nothing to say at this time of the
character of these charges. It is sufficiently
to our purpose that their number alone
would have confused, as they seem to have
done this jury, any dozen men compelled to
consider them only from recollection after
one hearing.
It cannot be concealed from those who
have watched this Foster trial closely that
these practices of selecting and then conf us
ing jurors whioh have gradually grown up in
the New York courts have been employed to
save this assassin from the doom whioh the
law fixes for murder. They may have been
employed to no purpose, and we do not
mean by tnese remarks to imply any impro
priety on the part of the counsel who have
used meanB which past practices have war
ranted but cannot justify. It is the prac
tices themselves, not those who employ
them, that we condemn. It has become
serious question, in view of the possible and
probable escape of this murderer upon what
we cannot consider as better tnan legal quib
bles, as to where these practioes are to lead
us in the administration of law and justice;
and the sooner it is answered the better for
justice and society.
THE PENNSYLVANIA DEMOCRACY
"THE CONSTITUTION AS IT IS."
From the JT. Y, World.
It gives us great satisfaction to call atten
tion to the resolutions passed by the Demo
cratic State Convention of Pennsylvania. They
are in the same excellent tone as the resolu
tions of the Kentucky Democracy, and furnish
another refutation of the libellous prediction
of Senator Morton relating to the Democratic
platform in 1872. According to reeent indi
cations the Democracy of Ohio will take the
samo ground with even greater frankness and
emphasis, and the New York Democracy has
stood on it since the fifteenth amendment
was finally proclaimed adopted. It will thus
be seen that the Democratic party in the four
most important, populous, and wealthy
States of the Union ' bury dead issues; and
the party, to borrow a Scripture expression,
is auout to "renew its strength like eagles
There are signs from every part of the coun
try, North and South, that the whole Demo
cracy is resuming the progressive spirit which
characterized it in the palmy days of its su
premacy.
While all of the Pennsylvania resolutions
(except that on the tariff) are good, two of
them are eminently satisfactory. We refer
to that denouncing any repudiation, direct or
indirect, of the publio debt; and that accept
ing the Constitution as it stands, new amend
ments and all. The latter occasioned soma
debate in the convention, but it was adopted
by a handsome majority. We regard this as
a crowning victory 01 me progressive ten
dency, and the final burial of that dead issn
We feel 6afe in predicting that it will never
be debated again in any assembly of Demo
crats, and that from this time forward th
whole party will unanimously accept the situ-
ation.
A PARTY WITHOUT PRINCIPLES.
Prut the A". 1'. Time.
No intelligent man can have followed the
diucuBbions which have been going on iu
Democratic circles during the past few
months, without perceiving very clearly that
the party is still in a state of chaos. It has
neither leaders nor a policy. The only solid
ground it had was cut from under its feet in
the Rebellion, and since then it has been
merely struggling from one morass to
Mother. It can bow tie nothing but borer
oa the outskirts ef the Republicw camp,
ani make "demonstrations " against it wbioh
end in renewed disappointments. There is
nothing like unanimity in the parry upon
any one point. When' one of its spokesmen
delivers an opinion, his voioe is instant
ly drowned in a wild tumult of contra
dictions. Indeed, the Democrats have been
much mere indebted to-discontented Repub
licans latterly than to their own regular sap
porters. Senator Sumner has proved a more
useful ally to them than any one of their
recognized advisers. The reason is that they
have no ideas of their ovm which have the
faintest chance of bein; acceptable to the
people, and therefore they are playing the
game which some people describe as "wait
ing upon Providence." They can originate
nothing themselves, but they hope they may-
gain some advantage frcm the mistakes of
their opponents. They are groping in the
dark for a policy, and eagerly clutch at the
hands of men like Senator Schurz, on the
desperate chance that they may be led by
an accident to find somotliag which will
suit them.
The general issue upon which they fall
back, when speoial issues fail them, is that
the "Constitution has been strained." Now,
supposing that to be the fact, which party is
responsible for it? In revolutionary times
all constitutions,, written or unwritten, are
very likely to be severely strained, and the
faction which precipitated the strife is gene
rally held accountable for any subsequent
vicissitudes. It is a spectacle not without
its ludicrous side to behold the Democrats,
who tried to tear the Constitution into a thou
sand pieces, complaining now that the men
who preserved it are straining some of
its provisions, and that they, the Demo
crats, cannot boar to see it injured.
Why was not this ansiety displayed
a few years ago? What would
there be left of the Constitution to day, or of
the Government which was founded on it, or
of the people who obeyed it, if the Demo
crats could have had their will in 1801? It is
wonderful what reverence they possess for
that instrument now. They are ready to fall
down and worship it. The World, for in
stance, falls into a kind of religious ecstacy
over its peculiar readings of the document
every other day, yet the Werla did all that it
could to assist the party which proposed to
dissolve the United States, and construct two
separate Governments out of the frag
ments. It tried then to make out that this
project was in harmony with the Constitu
tion, just as it now endeavors to prove
that the party which saved the Con
stitution is acting in violation of its
principles. Mr. John Q. Adams, who is an
able man, and not a trickster or a dreamer,
appreciates the true position of the two par
ties in relation to the Constitution with per
fect accuracy. He is too keen a man not to
see, and too candid a man not to acknow
ledge, that the secessionists alone menaced
the existence of theConstitution. "The Consti
tution was struck down," he says in his recent
letter, "by the assault upon Sumter, as all
constitutions must necessarily fall before the
face of the supreme arbitrament of war. It
can never be lifted up while war is flagrant.
The people will never resign the attitude of
hostile vigilance, which is the real signifi
cance of the present administration, until
they know that no one of their war trophies
is longer disputed."
These are the words of a tnoughtf ul man,
having a soul within him nobler than that of
any mere party hack; and they are much, bet
ter entitled to attention tnan any tmns wnicn
has recently appeared in Democratio joornaU
hereabouts. These two words, "hostile vigi
lance," in themselves express a policy and
it is a policy of which the Republicans are
proud. The Demoorats have constantly
proved the need which exists of continued
and unwearied vigilance, and the Republi
cans would deserve the execration of history,
notwithstanding all their past services, if
they now allowed the enemy to recover the
main part of what they have lost. We have
a policy to abide by, and no one who has eyes
and will use them can fail to realize its im
portance. Is it to the Democrats that the
country would be willing to commit the care
of the Constitution those very Democrats
who so recently were foroibly withheld from
utterly abolishing it ? Do we ask the burglar
whom we have caught entering the window
at night to come in and guard our property
while we return to our slumbers t
But, says another Democratio journal, you
are investing the president with "imperial
power, we shall soon have "no Constitution
left," "the Empire is imminent." No one has
hitherto supposed that the Executive branch
of the Government gained much by the
"strains" put upon the Constitution. Some
people have watched the legislative branoh
with more uneasiness but to talk ol an em
pire being at band is like the ravings of men
whose minds are a little disordered. The Ku-
kluz bill, upon which this terrible alarm is
raised, is probably the last of all the measures
necessitated by the Democratic revolution
and it is a measure which cannot
be put in force until disorders
have broken out in a btate, so
serious and so formidable that the Governor
of that State will be obliged to declare his
inability to suppress them. It is a measure
for preserving social order, without which all
governments are an idle name. To found on
such a bill as this the cry that you have made
the republic an empire is to the last degree
absurd. Sensible Democrats who disapprove
of the bill do not believe that it makes the
President an Emperor. Mr. Adams says
nothing of that kind. The general result of
all this is that the Demoorats dare not or can
not declare their policy, but are obliged to
fall back on vague talk about the "Constitu-
tion;" while the Republicans are determined
not to allow any more armed insurrections to
arise for the purpose of subverting tnat von
stitution. This is a policy good enough for
Republicans at present, so far as purely
national politics are concerned.
THE PROSPECT OF A CORDIAL UNDER
STANDING WITH AMERICA.
From the London Spectator.
We have at lenkrth the text of the Washing
ton Treaty, or at least of the most important
part of it so far as it reoites the principles
agreed upon by the Anglo-American uonimia
aioners for the settlement of our chief dis
pute with that country and we have great
reason te hope that the treaty will be found
to contain the conditions of a permanent and
cordial understanding between the two ooun
tries. To our minds the Foreign Oflioe de
serves great credit for having agreed to eon-
- . l j . in ; 1
ditions bo frank ana explicit conaiuous m
volving no kind of humiliation, indeed, as we
hold. aiscmlarlv iuflt and wise, and yet mvoiv
in enough sacrifice of pride, as it will
probably seem to some, to de
mand soma effoit and a good deal of
th rnRt kind of self-respect. In
the first dace, the British Government
through its commissioners, has frankly ex
pressed regret at the occurrence of the inoi
dents comDiained oi oy me uuitea otaies
ILL) was certainly both courageous and wise.
It does not in any sense prjndge the ques
tion of eur responsibility for' the escape of
the Confederate cruiser from British-ports,
for it is obvious that Vt is quite competent to
us, or anybody else, bo regret, and regret
very heartily, events which it would also
have been quite impossible to prevent. Nor
does such an expression or regret seem-to be
in any degree a gratuitous and forced devia
tion from the natural line of oonduot appro
priate for a great State, even granting, that
we were really quite without responmbiiity
for any of those events. For our Foreign
Enlistment aot was and if a declaration on
our part that it) is a part of the true purpose
and policy ef England to prevent,
bo lar as possible, exaotiy the
class ' of events for whioh-: we
have now expressed regret, and it oar. never
be unworthy evon of the greatest power to
declare her sorrow that she has not succeeded
in doing effectually what her law requires her
to do at all. What is more, we, at least, have
always asserted that it was e great a misfor
tune for England as for the United States
that cruisers continued to eceape from Eng
lish ports and bo greatly annoyed ' the com
merce of a belligerent powor. That vas a
precedent which it is quite certain worJd be
followed, and followed at great cost to our
selves, whenever we may be at war ngaia;
and the more completely we may havo- suc
ceeded in demonstrating now that no precau
tions which we could have taken could -have
been successful, the more completely shall
we be confuted out of our own mouths
in complaining, then, that cruisers
intended to prey upon cur commerce
should have been permitted by other powers
to escape from their ports. This will not,
therefore, be on our part a mere expression
of disinterested regret that one of " our most
important municipal laws should have proved
inefficient; it will bs a fresh argument in our
mouths to prove that we have a fair ripht to
demand from any other neutral the same evi
dence of sincerity of purpose which we have
thus ourselves given. While we maintain,
then, that such an expression of regret was
not only legitimate and dignified, but even
defensible on the lowest, because the most
self-interested, motive, we Bhould also con
tend that there is a fitness in any act which
will, without insincerity or compromise of our
rights, assume to the mind of the people of
the United States the form of an. apology.
An apology, no doubt, seems to imply some-
Hang of responsibility and culpability, some
consciousness of a fault of omissioa if not of
commission; and, as we have shown, the
question of responsibility is really not in
volved in what our commissioners have said,
and may be decided by the arbitrators to
whom it is to be referred entirely in our
favor. Still, however that may be, nobody
can - deny that there was enough of careless
ness about the conduct of Government in re
lation to at least one of these cruisers, and
enough of loudly-expressod class sympathy
with the cruisers, and of equally loudly-ex
pressed antipathy to the American national
cause, to aff ord a popular justification for the
intense nutation felt in the United States;
and therefore it seems to us quite right that
in relation to any purely formal issue between
ub, we should even Btrain a point to decide
against ourselves and in their favor. Sup
posing it were a question between
expressing regret at the risk of re
gret being misinterpreted by the Ame
rican people to mean self-reproach, and
not expressing regret at the risk ;of that reti
cence being misinterpreted by the American
people to mean entire indifference to the
wieobiefa oauued by the escape of the cruis
ers, we imnK we were bound in candor and
honor to run the first risk rather than the
second; for self-reproach ought certainly to
be le6s foreign to us in this matter than pure
indifference. We conclude, therefore, that
in relation to the point most likely to excite
unfavorable comment the frank expression
of regret by our commissioners at what oc
curred our Government have shown courage
and wisdom, and taken the only course likely
to beal the wound completely, by sacrificing
all unworthy pride and reserve.
. On all the other points.the solution arrived at
by the commission seems to us quite unex
ceptionable. For the. actual adjudication of
the Alabama claims, a commission of five
persons, one appointed by the British and
one by the American Government, and the
three others by the King of Italy, the Presi
dent of the Swiss Confederation, and the
Emperor of Brazil, is to be appointed, with
power either to decide finally for themselves
on the question of damages in a lump sum,
or to refer the details of such damages to a
Board of Assessors sitting in the United
States, of whom one is to be appointed by the
President, one by the Queen, and one by the
Italian Envoy in Washington. The principle
agreed on for the assessment of damages is
contained in the following very important
passage of the treaty:
"A neutral Government is'bound (1) to use due
diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming, or
t quipping within Us jurisdiction of an; vessel which
It bus reasonable ground to believe Is intended to
cruise or to carry on war against a power wltn which
It Is at peace, aud also to use like diligence to pre
vent tbe departure from Its jurisdiction of any vessel
intended to cruise or carry on war as above, such
vessel having been specially adapted In whole or la
part within such jurisdiction to warlike use; (a), not
te permit or suiter either belligerent to make use of
its ports or waters as the base of naval operations
against the other, or for tbe purpose or renewal or
augmentation ol military supplies, or arms, or re
cruitment of men ; (3), to exercise due diligence la
Us own ports and waters, and, as to ah persona
within its jurisdiction, to prevent any violation of
the foregoing obligations aud duties. Her Britaunlo
Majesty has commanded her commissioners to de
clare her Government canuot aaseut to the forego
ing rules as a Btatementof the principles of Inter
national law which were in force at the time when
the claims arose; but in order to evince a desire of
strengthening friendly relations between the two
countries, and of making satisfactory provision for
the future, her Government agrees that In deciding
questions arising out of these claims the arbitrators
shall assume the Government had undertaken to
act upon principles set forth la these roles. The
contracting parties agree to observe these rules be
tween themselves lu future, and to bring them to
the knowledge of other maritime power, Inviting
them to accede to them."
This solution of the difficulty we regard
with tbe most unfeigned satisfaction. On
the one hand, no one who bad looked into the
international law of the matter could admit
for a moment that these principles were the
actual principles recognized by the praotioe of
nations. On tbe other hand, no one could
deny the enormous desirability that any na
tion possessed of a great commercial marine
Bhould get such principles as these acknow
ledged for the future. It seemed but too
likely that in contending for our own unde
niable rights in the past, we might be injur
ing most seriously our prospects for the
future. By the concession now made we have
avoided this most dangerous error, and se
cured ourselves, as far as possible, from any
retaliation by the United States for the raids
of the Alabama and her consorts. At the
same time, we think it most likely that under
the terms now agreed upon the recognition
that it was our duty to use "diligence," not
"the utmost diligence," as had been reported
it will be hard to prove our responsibility
for the escape of any one of the cruisers
except the Alabama alone.
On the w hole, we congratulate Lord Gran
ville en having taken a bold and a most im-
porrant step towards a genuine understand
ingwilh the United Staten power witfe
whoa any grave misunderstanding of ours
must be pure and unalloyed evil, a source off
bitterness between kindred, a chronic danger
of the worst kind t both peoples, a terrible
stimulus to disaffection in Ireland, a stroke of
paralysis to England in Europe; in short, an
accumulation of allserts of dangers, without
a single counterbalancing good. It is the
first principle of a healthy foreign polioy for
England to have a cordial understanding with
America. All our common political objects
are akin;. we have much to karn from Ame
rica, America has muci to learn from ua, and
all experience has proved that when
the attitude of the two peoples is
hostile, instead of learning from each
other, we are too apt to read our
lessons backwards. Nor is it possible for
England to exercise the wholesome and paoiflo
influence which she naturally possesses in
Europe without being relieved from all anx
iety concerning America. Even now there
are rumors of the restlessness of Russia of
her wish to attack Austria while conciliating
Turkey, if so be that Germany and England
would permit which, if there- be any truth
in them, must make our Foreign Offioe ex
tremely anxious. Austrin-onoe fairly beaten,
the road to Constantinople would be open to
Russia, and this nobody understands better
than English diplomatists, Yet even if these
rumors were true, we coald not use our in
fluence t any purpose to restrain Russia,
while America is ready to nejze the moment
of our weakness to demand what terms she
will at the point of the sword. A sound
foreign policy for England, must always rest
on the basis of a hearty alliance, if not
co-operation with America; and to obtain
this, therefore, at any honorable price, should
be the firfct object of English statesmanship.
SHIPPING.
THE REGULAR STEAMSHIPS ON THE PHI
LADELPHIA AND CHARLESTON STEAM
SHIP LIKE are ALONE authorised to Issue througk
ollls of lading to Interior point South and West in
connection with South Carolina Railroad Company.
ALFRED L, TYLBH,
Vice-President So. C. RR. Co. 3
"'Cr PHILADELPHIA AND SOUTHERN
K.MAIf. ST KAMNllllf niMPlNV'H li V
UULAH 8 EMI-MON TILL X LiNE TO NEW OR
LEANS, La.
The YAZOO wUl sail for New Orleans, via Ha
vana, on Thursday, May 25th, at 8 A. M.
The JVN I ATA will sail from New Orleans, via
Havana, on Friday, May 26.
THROUGH KILLS Oh' LADING at as low rates
as by any other route given toMOlilLS, GALVES
TON. INDIANOLA. KOCKPOKT, LA VACUA, and
BliAZttS, and to all points on the MissisHippl rlvor
between New Orleans and St. Louis. Red river
freights reshlpped at New Orleans without charge
of commissions.
WEEKLY LINE TO SAVANNAH, OA.
The WYOMING will sail for Savannah on Sat
urday, May 'it, at 8 A. M,
Tha TONAWANtA will aall from Savannah, on
Satusday, May 11.
THROUGH DILLS OF LADING given to all the
principal towns In Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mis
sissippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, aud Tennessee In con
nection with tbe Central Railroad of Georgia, At
.aB2lc and Gulf Kallread, and Florida steamers, at
aslow rates as by competing lines.
SEMI-MONTHLY LINE TO WILMINGTON, N. O.
The xMONEEH will sail for Wilmiugtoa, N C on
Thursday, may 25, at A. M. Returning, will leave
Wilmington Thursday, June 1st.
Connects with the Cape Fear River Steamboat
Company, the "Wilmington and Weldon and North
Carolina Railroads, and the Wllmlugton and Man
chester Railroad to all Interior points.
Freights for Colombia, S. C, and Augusta, Ua.,
taken via WlliBlngton at as low rates as by any
other route.
Insurance effected when requested by shippers.
Bills of lading tiigned at yueeu street wharf oa or
before day or sailing.
WlLiiAM. L. JAMES, General Agent,
nu. lou o. j uiuii street.
Vpt CLYDE'S 8TBAM LINES.
'UT Oice, No. 12 South WHARVES.
PHILADELPHIA. RICHMOND AXD NORFOLK
STEAM biilP LINE, THROUGH FREIGHT AIR
LINE TO THE SOUTH AND WEhT.
Steamers leave every WEDNR8DAY and SATUR
DAY "at noon," from FIRST WHARF above MAR-
KEI? l5tT66t
lo bills of lading signed after la o'clock on sailing
day.
THROUGH RATES to all points In North and
South Carolina, via Seaboard Air-line Railroad, con
necting at Portsmouth, and at Lynchburg, Va., Ten
nessee, and the West via Virginia and Tennessee
Alr-line, and Richmond and Danville Railroads.
Freights HANDLED BUT ONCE and taken at
LOW EK RATES than by any other line.
No charge for commissions, drayage, or any ex
Dense of transfer. Steamships Insure at lowest
rates.
FREIGHTS RECEIVED DAILY.
State-room accommodations for passengers.
WM. P. POKTKh, Agent, Richmond and City
Point. T. P. CROWELL CO., Agents, Norfolk.
PHILADELPHIA AND CHARLESTON.
-PHILADELPHIA and CHARLESTON
STEAMSHIP LINE.
THURSDAY LINE FOR CHARLESTON.
The first-class Steamship EMPIRE, Captain
Hinckley, wul sail on Thursday, May 25, at 8
P. M., noon, from Pier 8, North Wharves, above
Arch street.
Through bills of lading to all principal points tn
8onth Carolina, Georgia, Florida, etc., etc.
Rates of freight as low as by any other route.
For freight or passage apply on the Pier, as above,
WM. A. CO URTKNAi, Agent in Charieotou.
FOR NEW YORK DAILY VTA
iDELA WAKE AND R A HIT AN CANAL.
The CHEAPEST aud QUICKEST water commu
nication between Philadelphia and New York.
Steamers leave DAILY from first wharf below
MARKET Street, Philadelphia, and foot of WALL
Street. New York.
THROUGH IN TWENTY-FOUR HOURS.
Goods forwarded by all the lines running out of
New York, North, East, and West, free of commls-
"Frclgnt received dally and forwarded on accom
modating terms.
JAMES nAND, Agent,
No. 119 WALL Street, New York.
-.rr K NSW EXPRESS LINE to ALEX-
.k Tt it I UEOKGETOWN, AND
uhiiiNUTON. D. C, Chesapeake and Delaware
Canal, connecting with Orange and Alexandria
Railroad.
Steamers leave regularly every SATURDAY at
noon, ironi r uov nun huuvb vaniuii oireeb
Freights received daily.
HYDE TYLER, Agents, Georgetown, D. C.
M. KLURLDUE fc CO., Agents, Alexandria, Va.
m - TT fc. DELAWARE AND CHESAPEAKE
tiTiiiii W ill - uumfANV.
towed between Philadelphia. Baltlmorn.
Havre-de-Grace, Delaware City, aud Intermediate
p0lCAPTAINJOnN LAUOnLIN, 8operlnteudenL
OFFICE, No, 18 South WHARVES,
rniLADKLPllIA.
wiluam pTclide & CO.,
v v. AGENTS
For all the above lines,
No. 12 SOUTH WHARVES, Philadelphia,
where further information may be obtained.
FOR NEW YORK. VIA DELAWARH
ana luiritan uauai.
bVN IFTSL'RE TRANSPORTATION COMPANY.
.UU-Or ATUU ANU SWllf lsU KK LlNKa.
The steam propellers of this company leave dally
I II JU. BUU U X ML.
Throngh In twenty-four hours.
Goods forwarded to aay point free of commission.
jrreignts taxea oa accouuuouauug terms.
Apply to
WILLIAM M. BAIRD A CO., Agents,
No. South DELAWARE Avenue.
T70R ST. THOMAS AMD BRAZIL,
JL7 UNITED STATES and BRAZIL STEAM-
REGULAR MAIL STEAMEJtd Balling on the
Baa vi every luuum.
MKRK1MACK, Captain Wler.
boVTH AMHRICA, Captain S. L. TtnklepaagU.
NORTH AMEhlCA, Captain G. B. S.oouia.
These splendid steamer Ball ou schedule tune,and
rail at St. Thetuas, Para, Pernambuoo, Bahla, anf
Rio de Janeiro, going and returning. For engage
Luent of freight or passage, apply to
WM. R. UAkRLSON, Agent,
No . 0 Bowling-green, New York.
CHIPPINQ.
ff1?J.- FOR -LIVERPOOL . AND QUERNS-
lIikuTUWN.-Tb Inman Line of Royal Mi
Ettenraera are appointed to sail as follow:
Ciu of Limerick, via Halifax, Tuesday, May 1, at
P 1A
city ef Baltimore, TluEmday, May IS, at IP. If.
City of Paris, Matantay, May 80. at IP. M,
City of Brawmin, Saturday. May 37. at II A. M.
and each sncceMing Saturday and alternate Tuee
day, from pier No. 45 North river.
. RATKS OF PASS AGS
By. Mall Steamer Baaing every Saturday,
Payable m gold. rayaMe In currency.
First Cabin ITB.Steerage 30
To London no To London ., 89
To Halifax 80 1 To Halifai 18
Passengers also forwarded to Antwerp, Rotter
dam, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, eto., at reduced
rates.
Tickets can be bought here at moderate rates by
persons wishing to send for their friends.
For further lnformatloa apply at tbe oempanyi
office.
JOHN G. DALE, Agent. No. 1G Broadway, N. Y. I
ur to u'lxtNi auu faulk., Agents,
No. 402 CHESNUT Street. Philadelphia,
Eh NATIONAL
STEAMSHIP COMPANY.
STEAM DIRECT TO AND FROM NEW YORK.
QUKKNSTOWN, A.tD LIVERPOOL.
The matrnlflcent Ocean Steamstuo of thiaiina
Bailing regularly every SATURDAY, are among the
largest In the world, aud famous for the degree of
saiety, eon) fort, and speed attained. -
CABIN RATES. CURRENCY.
ITS and tse. First class Kacurslon Tickets, good for
twelve months, tiso. Early application must be
made in order to secure a etioice or state-rooms.
STEERAGE RATKS. CURKKNCY.
Outward, m Prepaid, S32. Tickets to and from
Londonderry and u-iasgow at the same low rates.
Persons vlBitlne the old country, or sendlnir for their
friends should remember that these rntes are posi
tively mach cheaper than other tlrst-elaas lines.
Bank drafts issued for auy amounai lowest rates
Eayable on demand In all part of Eutrland, Ireland,
cotland, Wales, and tfte Contlneut of Europe.
Apply to WALKER fc CO., Agents,
A'o.804 WALNUT St., jwit above 8eoond.
fffift? LoiaLLA-KD STEAMSHIP lOOMTABT
FOR IVBW YOKU,
SAILING TUESDAYS, THURSDAY S, AND SAT
URDAYS AT NOON.
INSURANCE ONE-EIGHTH OF ONE PER CENT.
No bill of lading or receipt signed for less than
fifty cents, and no Insurance effected for less than
one doHar premium.
For further particulars and rates apply at Com
panyl office, Pier 88 East river. New York, or to
JOHN F. OHL,
PIER 1 NORTH WHARVES,
ft. a. Extra rates ou small packages iron, metals'
eta
F
OK SAVANNAH, l EOSOI A
THE FLORIDA PORTS,
AND THE SOUTH AND SOUTHWEST.
GREAT SOUTHERN FREIGHT AND PASSEN
GER LINE.
CENTRAL RAILROAD OF GEORGIA AND AT-
LAINT1U A IV l GULF RAILKOAD.
FOUR STEAMERS A WEEK. I
TUESDAYS,
m U KS1 A I JS,
AND SATURDAYS.
TnE STEAMSHIPS i
SAN SALVADOR, Captain Nlckersoa, from Pies
No. 8 North River.
WM. R. GARRISON, Agent,
No. 6 BowUag Green.
MONTGOMERY, Captain Falrcloth, from Pier No.
13 North River.
R. LOWDEN. Agent,
No. 93 West street.
LEO, Captain Dearborn, from Pier No, is East
River.
MURRAY, FERRIS & CO., Agents,
Nob. 61 and 64 South street.
GENERAL BARNES, Captain Mallory, from Plot
No. 86 North River.
LIVINGSTON, FOX A CO., Agents,
No. 88 Liberty street.
Insurance by this line ONE-HALF PER CENT.
Superior accommodations for passengers.
Through rates And bills of lading la connection
With the Atlantio and Gulf Freight line.
Through rates and bills of lading in connection
with Central Railroad of Georgia, to all points.
C. D. OWENS, I OSORGE YONGE,
Ageat A . A G. R. R., Agent C. R. R.,
No. 82 Broadway. No. 409 Broadway.
THE ANCHOR LINK STEAMERS
Sail every Saturday and alternate Wednesday
to and from Glasgow and Derry.
Passengers booked and forwarded to and from all
railway stations In Great Britain, Ireiaad, Ger
many, Norway, Sweden, or Denmark and America
as safely, speed-Uy, comfortably, and cheaply as by
UJ UfcUC I I'll LC UI IU10.
"1XPRK88" 8TXAMKBS.
"BXTRA" STIAlfXBS.
IOWA,- .
TYRIAN,
BRITANNIA.
IOWA,
TYRIAN,
AJNGLIA,
AUSTRALIA,
BRITANNIA,
INDIA,
COLUMBIA,
t-lKUfA.
From Pier 20 Nerth river, New York, at noon.
Rates of Passage. Payable in Currency,
to Liverpool, Glasgow, or Derry :
First cabins. 160 and 175. according tn lnnatinn.
Cabin excnrslon tickets (good for twelve months),
coming uesi bccuuiiuuuuuouH, IUU,
Intermediate. 133: steenure. 12&.
Certificates, at reduced rates, can be bought herj
uj muBo winuiiig hi buu ior tneir mends.
Drafts Issued, payable on presentation.
Apply at the company's offices to
.11 ' - .f" J AJIWliAUAlO,
' No. 1 BOWLING GREEN.
OORDAQE, ETO.
CORDAGE.
tfanllla, Siial and Tarred Cordage .
At Lowest Hew York PrlOM tad Freights,
EDWIN B. FITLEK CO
aTaotoii, TJtBTH 8. and GBRMAHTOWa Avonoa. ',
tor. No. (8 WATEB 0k. and U IL DXLAWAB.B
Atus.
PHILADELPHIA
TOHN S. LEE fc CO., ROPE AND TWINS
DEALERS IN NAVAL STORES,
ANCHORS AND CHAINS,
SHIP CHANDLERY GOODS, ETC..
Nos. 46 and 48 NORTH WHARVES.
WHI8KY, WINE, ETO.
TY7IKES, LIQUORS, ENGLISH AND!
SCOTCH ALES, ETC.
The subscriber begs to call the attention of
dealers, connoisseurs, and consumers generally to
his splendid stock of foreign goods now ou hand, oi
his own Importation, as well, also, to his extenslvtl
assortment oi uomestio wines, Ales, etc, among
w iiicu may ie enumerated
boo cases of Clarets, high and low grades, care'
fully selected from best foreign stocks.
100 casks of Sherry Wine, extra quality of Ones!
grade.
loo cases of Sherry Wine, extra quality of fines!
grade. i
! casks of Sherry Wine, best quality of medluul
graae.
ks barrels Scuppernong Wine of best quality.
CO casks Catawba Wine " "
Together with a full supply of Brandies, Whiskies!
boo ten ana x-ngiisn Aies, iirowu oiouu, eu;., v.
which be Is prepared to furnish to the trade and cob
sumers generally la quantities that may be re
quired, and on the most liberal terms.
P. J. JORDAN.
B Stf No. 820 PEAR Street,
Below Third and Walnut and above Dock street.
CAR8TAIR8 A McCALL,
Ho. 126 Walnut and 21 Granite StaJ
IMPORTERS OF
Er an dlei, Winei, Gin, Olive Oil, Eta
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
PURE RYE WHISKIES,
IN BOND AND TAX PAID. 8Si
CTEAM ENGINES,
WITH PLAIN SLIDE
O valve, i
nr rut oil vertical. Horizontal, ana
Portable. Governors, Pumps, pipes, and Valves,
a mi No. IT S. E1GUTKKNTH street.