Millheim Journal. (Millheim, Pa.) 1876-1984, June 02, 1887, Image 1

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    The Millheim Journal,
PUBLISHED EVERY* THURSDAY BY
J\. 3L.
Office in the New Journal Building,
Peno St.,near ilartman's foundry.
•1.00 PER ANNUM, IN ADVANCE,
OK FIL.TS I* WOT PAID IN ADVAHOS.
Acceptable Corresponießce Solidlet
Address letters to MILLHEIM JOURNAL.
BUS INE SS CARDS
yt IIAHT Ell,
auctioykfr,,
MILLIIKIM, PA
B. STOVER,
AUCTIONEER,
Mftdisouburg, PK.
H.KKIFShYDKIL
AUCTIONEER,
MILLIIKIM, PA.
J W. LOSE,
AUCTIONEER,
MILLIIKIM. PA
JOHN F. IIAHTER.
Practical Dentist,
Office opposite Urn Metbodisi Church.
MAIN STKRKT, MILLIIKIM PA.
JQR. J. W. ST AM,
Physlfian & Surgeon,
Office on Penn street,
MILLHEIM, PA.
GEO. L. LEE,
Physician Surgeon,
MADISONBURG, PA.
Office opposite the Public School House.
M.D..
WOODWARD, PA.
JG O. DEININGER,
Notary-Public,
Journal office, Penn St., Millheim, Pa
Deeds and other legal papers written and
acknowledged at moderate charges.
L. SPRINGER,
Fashionable Barber,
MAIN STREET, MILLUEIM, PA.
Shop opposite Millheim Banking House.
Shaving. Haircuttlng, Sbampooning,
Dying, Ac. done in the most satisfac
tory manner.
Jno.H. Orvla. C. M. Bower. Kills L.Orris
QRVIS, BOWER A OTTVIS,
AUorneys-at-Law,
- BELLEFONTE, PA.,
Offieeln Wooding. Building.
D. H. Hastings. W. F. Reeder.
-g- ASTINGS A REEDER,
AUorneys-at-Law,
BELLEFONTE, PA.
Offle. on AUegbeny Street, two doors east of
the office oeupied by the late Arm of Yocum A
Hastings.
JC. MEYER, .
Attorney-at-Law,
BELLEFONTE PA.
At the Office of Kx-Jndge Hoy.
C. HEINLE,
AUorney-al-Law.
BELLEFONTE, PA.
Practices in all the eourts of Centre county
Special attention to Collections. Consultations
in German or English.
J A. Beaver. J. W.Gephart.
GEAVER A GEPHART,
AMorneys-at-Law,
BELLEFONTE, PA.
Office on Alleghany Street. North of High Street
JGROCKKRLIOFF HOUSE,
ALLEGHENY ST., BELLEFONTE, PA.
C, G. McMILLEN,
PROPRIETOR.
Oood Sample Room on First Floor. Free
Buss to and from all tralus. Special rates to
witnesses and Jurors
QUMMINB HOUSE,
BISHOP STREET, BELLEFONTE, PA.,
EMANUEL BROWN,
nOFBROB
Home newly refitted and refurnished. Ev
erything done to make guests comfortable.
Rates in odera** tronage respectfully solici
ted 5-ly
JRVIN HOUSE,
(Most Central Hotel in tbe city.)
COBNKR OF MAIN AND JAY BTBKBTB
LOCK HAVEN, PA.
S.WOODS~OALDWELL
PBOPBIETOB.
Good sameple rooms (oifooaunerdaVTraTel
axs oo trst floor.
t •-
R. A. BUMILLER, Editor.
VOL. 01.
J-yt. S. ti OUTELIUS,
DEVTIBT,
MILLIIKIM, Pa.
offer* hi* PPO(I*IOIMU service* to the nubile.
He Is prepared la perform all ti|Mralloiis In the
dental profession. lie Is u>>w fully prepared to
extract teeth absolutely without imin
A*
Mrs. Sarah A. Zeigler's
BAKERY,
on Penn street, south o< race bridge,
Millheim, Pa.
Bread, Pies & Cakes
ot superior quality can he bought at any time
an, l in any quantity.
ICE CREAM AND FAN
CY CAKES
for Winldtne,. rtcntcs niut ottn'r uncial natlwr
lug* promptly madc to order.
Call at her place and Ret your supplies at ex
ceedingly low prices. 34-Sm
P. H. MUSSER,
W ATCHM A HER'-AiJ EW ELER,
Main Street, Millheim, Pa.,
-eJOPPOSITK THE BANK.J*—
ffijr Repair Work a Specailty. Sat
isfaction guaranteed. Your patronage
respectfully solicited. 5-ly.
THE
ATTENTION
of the Imblic in general and businet men In
particular it directed to the fact that the
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IS S VPPLIED | jj! WI Til (J 0 01)
-^■PRISSIS-!
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EMPLOYS nij ONLY
IS
dxpflrirord J§ Workmen
AND HAS A FINE SELECTION OF
DISPMY TYPE
SUBMRUVUi
LETTER HEADS 13 NOTE HEADS,
BTA TEMEN TS, i i HI LLHE A DS,
ENVELOPES, CIRCULARS,
na-. __
AyAy AyAyAyAyAyAyAyAyAyAyAy
POSTERS, PAMPHLETS.
Legal Blanks, Cards,
and, inshort, neat and tasty
Job Printing of all kinds
XXEvUTED PROMPTLY AND CHEAPLY.
1
for Infants and Children.
"Caatorla is ao wU adapted to children that I Castcrla enrea Oolle, OoMtlpation,
1 recuiuiueiul it as superior to any prc&crtnUuu I S< >ur Stomach. IHarrhaaa, Eructation,
kaowu to me." ]L a. a.iuh, M. D.. I lvuß oluoU * *
111 Bu Oxford BL, Brooklyn, N. Y. | Without injurious medicating.
TUB CXXTXUS COUPANT, ISt Pulton fitreet, N. Y.
n. w. EBY, YT
—DISTILLER OF— |Hv^
Straight PUEE M
I iff RYE WHISKEY „
.sssbs* for medical use.
WooddVb Cciitt'c Co., Pcqqq
SPRING IS HERE!
and with It our experienced Itallor
X. W. IBTTOK,
who ha* prepared himself to do all kind* of work In the most workmanlike an<l satisfactory
manner. The public are cordially luvlU'd to oitll and see his
Samples of Cloths and Cassimeres,
from the best and tnot reliable New York and Philadelphia house*.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
|jgr Cutting done to order and suits made in the latest styles.
DON'T FOKGKT TIIK PLACE,
Frank's Shop, North Street,
MILLHEIM. Pa.
MUSSER & ALEXANDER, Proprietor.
\ V AHVfArTtJRRIU OV AXU UKALEItH IV
'j'j'j'j'j —auaaua —jjjjjj— jjaaaj — auaaiiu —tiuayaa—uaauao
□aaaaa —aaaaaa —aaaawj—JJJJJA —JJJJAJ —JJJJJJ —au'-iaa
FINEST MATERIAL, BEST WORKMANSHIP, LO WESTJPRICES.
Call on us st our shops, ssst of t>rldff.'M*tn St.. Millheim. Pa. Correspondence respectfully solicited
J. R. SMITH & CO.,
1 LIMITED. I
Nos. 220, 222 & 224 Front Street,
MILTON", IP-A-.
The Largest House Furnishing Emporium in
* Central Pennsylvania.
D
THE PLACE TO GET A SQUARE DEAL AND THE BEST BARGAINS.
O
FURNITURE FOH I AltLOlt,S AI .O'ioUNt/nG lIOUSK.AN D KITCHF.N .
ItOOD] SUITS OUlt POPE.^-
Come and Visit a Pleasant Homo, Artistically, Tusllly and Comfortably Furnished.
On the Second Floor we have
si WMQ&K MOUSE FWMttßmß&
—and thoroughly equip|ed to show our goods and how to arrange your hoinel'pleasautly,
□
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS of all Ms and the LITEST SHEET MDSIC.
We soil the following cclehrntedJl'lano9:
CHICKERING, KNABE, WEBER, BIEHR BROS., GUILD, VOSE AND
+*+ NEW ENGLAND.
, A better I'lano sold here at a lower price than any hou*e In tli state. We have no rent' and hav
supervision of our own business. All tlie PIPK AND CAIIINhT OKtJANS. hverything
at bottom prices. A postal card to us may save you i r per cent.
p
CARPETS TO SUIT ALL.
AX M INS T Kit, VELVETS, BODY BRUSSELS, INGRAINS RAQS,
ARI SQUARES, RUGS, MATS, MATTING, STOVE AND
FLOOR OIL CLOT US.
The Finest Assortment of
Silverware, China, tilais and Stoneware, Lumps, Chandelier. A Ilrlc-n*Brae
ever seen. Our Curtain and Upholstering Department is not surpiiß sed in ihe cities.Hotel
Churches and Private Residences Furnished at short notice and at low rates.
Our immense Building Is literally packed with goods from attic to cellar. We are enabled to sell
the lowest because we sell the most. Everybody visits us and thinks our house a
marvel. The handsomest Side-Boards, Escritoires, Chiffonieres, Writing
Desks, Hall Backs, Slate and Marble Mantels In the land.
Busy all the time. Every Bid a Sale
A PAPER FOR THE HOME CIRCLE.
MILLHEIM PA.. THURSDAY. JUNE 2.. 1887.
A FALLEN IDOL
"I I Link In in the very I'mlnnliuioiit of
chivalry ami gallantry," Maid Ethel Hunt,
eiitliiitduMtically.
She WIIM a dark-cheeked, diamond-eyed
gill of eighteen, with braid* of hlue-hho-k
hair eoihsl around the haek of LO-r HIIIIIII,
(■reek sha|M*l lieiul and a eolor a* rleli and
velvety as the Hide of a July peaeh.
"Humph !" said Aunt Sara. "I've heard
girls talk no before and It generally ended in
one thing.
"For shame ! Aunt Mara," nried Ktliel
coloring up to her eyelashes. "I only
tuean, of Course, that he Is a very agree
able eom|NXiiion."
"An ngm-able companion — of course,"
said Aunt Sara. "Lsk Ethel ; do you
think white Maltese lace of French blonde,
w ith a heading of iComan |M-arls, would Is
prettiest for this lierthe ?"
Aunt Sara knew when to drop a suhjis-t
and wheu to hold on to it ! ltut when Kth
wan snienmg run uf jfp'iicli
bloiule on to the white silk dress her young
aunt's mind wan husy U]MIII the to|dc she
had apparently abandoned.
"The disagreeable fellow," thought Aunt
Sara. "He has some how heard that Ktliel
has money, and lie is determined to win it.
if site could only sec him in his true light—
hut I know w hat a perverse thing a wo
man's heart is. dust as sure as 1 attempt to
tell her what lie really is she'll make up her
mind that he is the finest and leant appre
ciated peraonuge on the face of the earth.
And I did so want her to k<*ep her heart
whole until Karl Wei In cornea to IN- ('bale's
groomsman. Earl Wells is worthy of a
princess.
"They nay lie is jierfoctly intolerable at
home," Mara said to herself. "Clara Wat
ers was there once and heard him rating his
sisters fearfully lnn-aiise the lx-efstcak for
his late breakfast wan a little overdone. If
only I could manage it that Ktliel should
see liiui iu his true light."
She nat and thought a while longer — and
suddenly the color bloomed into her cheeks,
and dimples into her chin, she started up.
"Ktliel," she said, "I'm sure you must U
tired of sitting over that everlasting stitch
ing. I've got to go over to Susy Morand's
to borrow a pattern. It will I*' just n pleas
ant walk for us."
"To Miss Morand's ?" Ktliel was vexed
with herself, hut she could not help the tell
tale bhssl that surged Into her cheeks.
"Isn't it rather early ? Only y o'clock !"
♦♦Early ? Not a hit ! Susy and I are mi
intimate that we don't mind curl pa|icrs
and calico wripjiers. Get your hat and
come along, quick !"
Hut, in spite of her exhortations to SJM**l,
Sara Martell smiled to herself to jM-reeive
that Ktliel Hunt lingered long enough in
her own room to change her black lace
breast-knot for a liecoming little butterfly
bow of rone-colnrcl riidsui, and to rearrange
the dainty teiidrills of silky black hair that
droojx-d so caressingly over her low, broad
forehead.
"Alto lUuk, 'VO .ihnll *>*< .1 uliutl Monilld,"
she thought to herself. "Well, jM ihap* we
shall. lam putting myself entirely in the
hands of lack and chance."
But when they reached the Morand man- j
sion. instead of ringing formally at the front
d<M<r. Miss Martell went around to the iuick
I torch, a Utile entrance all shaded with hon
eysuckles and trumpet vines.
"1 always p in here," said she nonchal
antly, in reply to Ethel's rei ionstrating
glance. "Site Morand and 1 are just like
si stem. "
Sue Morand, a blooming gir! of eighteen,
was in the kitchen making apple pies.
"The pattern ? Of course you shall have
It," she cried, "dust wait a minute till 1
get it"
"I'll go w ith you," said Sara. "Ktliel,
you'll not mind wait for us here ?"
"Not in the least," sai.l Ktliel. And she
sat dow n by the window, where ivies, train
ed In lMittb-s of water, were creeping like
greeti jewels across the crystal panes of
glass.
"Sue ? Sue !" She staril a# the voice of
her preux chevalier of the evening before
came roaring down the back stairs. "Con
found you all down there, why aren't my
lssits blacked ? Sue ! Mother ! Nell !
What's IKVOJIIO of my breakfast ! Y'ou
must think a man lias nothing to do hut to
lie here and wait all day for you laxy folks
to stir around."
Then* was no reply as he paused, appar
ently expending one. "Mother" was down
in the garden under a big green suii-lsmnct,
gathering scarlet-cheeked tomatoes for din
ner. "Nell" was in the front yard picking
red- veined autumn leaves out of the gold
and russet drift* that lay like treasures of
precious stones upon the grass.
Sue was shut up among the mysteries of
"patterns" innumerable, with Miss Sara
Martell. Ethel Hunt sat coloring and half
frightened, the sole auditress of Mr. Mor
atid's objurgations.
"I know there's aome one down there !"
he shouted. "I can hear you breathe and
your dress rustle. Just like your ugliness
not to answer n fellow ! I>o you hear, Sue?
lllaek my boots, quick ! I'm waiting for
them !"
And bang ! bang ! came the useful ar
ticles of wear in question down the winding
stairway that h*l to the kitchen.
Poor little Ethel ! She half rose up, then
sat down again, pi toon sly undeeidid what
to do, and even while she hesitated, with
color varying like the ml and white of the
American flag iu a high wind, the door at
the foot of the stairs flew op-ii and in
stalked Mr. , Julian Morand, sallow and dis
heveled, with unkempt lialr and beard, fret
tnlly curved mouth and most nnliccoming
costume of a Turkish dressing gown, faded
poarl-colored nether garments and stocking
ed feet thrust into ml morocco slippers.
"I say, you," he snarled out, "why don't
you "
And then percivlng to whom he was act
ually addressing himself, he started haek,
turning flery ml.
"Miss Hunt?"
And, with a downward glance at his toi
let, he fairly turned and fled, the skirts of
his Turkish dressing gown floating like rod
and orange meteors berhiml him. And,
mortitled and terrified though she was Ethel
Hunt could not resist the temptation to
break into a ]>eal of hearty laughter.
This, then, was her ideal among man, her
"Sir Launcelot" of fancied perfection snar
ling at his mother and sister like an ill-con
ditioned bear, flinging old boots down the
stairs at them, tumbling out of bed at 9 o'-
clock in tlie morning, while his mother solit
kindlings and picked tomatoes out in the
vegetable garden ! Like some Chinese idol
BO fell Mr. J ulian Moraud off bis high pe-
destal iu the est I ination of Miss Ktliel Hunt
Mlic told it ulI to Mara Martell when they
were safe at home.
"Aunt Mara," she said, "I am thoroughly
disenchanted."
Mis* Martell shrugged her Hhouhh ri and
mentally thanked her lucky stars.
"1 could have told you as much lefurc,"
said she. "These Adonises are like cheap
calico— they will neither waab uor wear !
Walt until Karle H. Wells comes. The
nicest young fellow iu the world — after my
betrothed husband."
When Mr. Wells came he so far justified
Aunt Sara's encomiums that Ethel really
did like him. And Aunt Mara was willing
to leave the rest to fate.
MATT IK MORGANS' LIFE.
An English Olrl Who Has Served as
Locomotive Fireman and Engineer.
For some time there has Is-cn a g<ssi deal
of quiet talk among the railroad men in this
vicinity of the singular discovery made by
the officers of the Natigamrx i;aitwu>' Com
pany that a woman disguised in male attire
hail leeii running an engine ou their rood
for many mouths, says a l!rldgeport(Coiin.)
corrcs)Mi!ideiit to the N. 1". Star. The he
roine is an English girl named Mattie Mor
gans, who came to this country ulsmt two
years ago after serving her apprenticeship
as stoker on the Great Northern railway,ls—
tween London and Edinburgh. She con
cealtd her sex so cleverly that she readily
secured a |ssdtioli as fireman on the Nuuga
tuek railroad and was eventually promoted
to the jsist of engineer,first ou a freight ami
afterward on a passenger locomotive, a i*t
which she might have held to this day but
for lier voluntarily retirement alsmt six
mouths ago.
Five years ago Mattie Morgans, then a
pretty girl of nineteen, fell in love with Torn
Winnau.nii engineer of the "Flying Scotch
man." Tom's run was from Kings Station,
Loudon, to York and return alternate days.
The"Flying Motehman'a" service includes a
train froiiiKdiuhurgh and one from Loudon,
leaving each day at ten a. in., and passiug
at Y'ork. The total distance is fonr hundred
miles ; the time, nine hours. These trains
carry the royal mail. Tlie Goverment con
tract tails for a forfeiture of a jmund ster
ling for every minute the train is behind
the schedule time, which seldom happens.
It is not an uncommon thing in England
and M<-othind to find mail's work performed
by women, and what more natural than iu
this case to find woman's love of adventure,
curiosity and love overcoming all objec
tions. A short time only was required to
bring alsmt her plans. With Tom's earnest
assistance she was duly installed as stoker
under his charge, her rough fustian suit and
face purposely besmeared with coalduat and
oil,completely disguising Tom's sweetheart.
Day after day the "Flying Scotchman," en
gine No. :si'J, with seven foot drivers, ami
just from the shops at Dundoon, flew over
the rails at the rate of fifty-two seconds to
the mile — Honest Tom's hand ou the throt
tle and his sweetheart lighting at the fire*
lstx. :%ovei iinmtmi o4 i— SMID. the
dust, the roar, neither confusion nor fa
tigue, for Tom's cheery words and encour
aging smile were ever rawly, slid his strong
arms saving her the heavy burdens from
day to day. It was her pride to keep the
steam guage pointing at high-pressure mark.
She understood the duties of oiling and
cleaning, and was always ready to "lusik
out the grate" or "set the guide cups."
The engine had no cab, but instead tlie
conventional English dash-board, an almost
useless thing against a storm. It was not
long liefore lier face became weather-beaten,
which, together with the coal-dust and
griuie, made the chance of discovering her
identity less and less. Tom was very care
ful. He watched to sec that no meddling
engineer should observe that his "stoker"
was a woman. Mo matters went on for
nearly a year. Tom and she were to have
INCH married. With the forethought of
Trad dies, in "David Cnpperileld," hits of
furniture and household utensils were
bought, and the day looked forward too for
happy housekeeping ; but fate had decreed
otherwise. Torn Winnan was killed. He
was run over in the switch yard by a shunt
'ed car and di*l within an hour, hi.* bead
upon bis "stoker's" lap. It was then, when
in lier anguish, Mattie Morgans' grief be
trayed lier womanhood.
She lh*l the country and came to the U
nit<*l States. Her stock of money began to i
dwindle. What to do next puaxled lier. |
Tlie situation daily became more alarming. !
Des|ierate at last she determined to disguise
herself and apply to some railroad master
of motive power for a place as fireman.
She was not long in securing a situation
n ]sin a Conncticut railroad, and after serv
ing for nearly two years was appointed as
engineer of a freight locomotive.
Perhaps lier experience is liest told in her
own words.
"Y'es, I was appointed engineer of the
night freight. I had a seventy-four-mile
run, and old "Ti' was my engine. Tbe first
night 1 ran a forward strap of the main rod
broke. 1 disconnected tlie main rod, cover
ed the 'ports,' wedged up and fastened the
'cross head,' anil crawled twenty miles
with only one side working, losing no less
than one hour of my running time. Then 1
pit stalled in an up-grade and stood there
until morning for a relief engine. 1 sui>-
jsise you would think it strange if I should
tell you that I have lioen inside of my en
gine's fire Ixix, but of course it was cold. I
have also lssui inside tlie spark arrester and
shifted the diaphragam. Once while run
ning a passenger train I keyed up and fas
tened a slipped eccentric. We were run
ning forty miles an hour when it happened.
1 shut off, gave her sand, turned the air
cook for brakes and brought up the train all
standing. My fireman and I crawled un
der the forward driver axle and pried the
eccentric into place. The passengers gatli
erisl alsmt and looked on. My fireman
elimlssl haek into the cab and worked the
lever until the links came into place, and
then tightened the sot screws holding the
eccentric in place. I could not adjust the
'throw' to a nicety, and in consequence the
'lead* was a trifle 'oft"' on one side, so that
when we started again tlie 'exhaust' barked
unevenly, sounding like the exhaust of an
engine not properly 'quartered.' I perform
ed the job in six minutes which drew con
siderable attention from railroad men. I
received a letter of recommendation from
tlie superintendent, and was shortly there
after given the'day express' to run. I nev
er had any serious accident, but I have kill
ed two men. One was walking on the
track. I blew and blew for hitn, but he did
not bear me and was struck. The other
man attempted to drive his wagon over a
Terms, SI.OO per Year, In Advance.
jfrailv <T<riMiii|f. I atrtu'k him und klllwl
him itinl hi* horn** also.
"There nccU)enta luul a *tr.uitf *ft**t up
on iin*. (>f con rim I wiui not to lilauio antl
was exoiioratail by the ofldala, but uting
the.e men klllt*l prodnoed insomnia. I
could not HlfM-p. Their fCM were constant
ly staring at ue. I began to run down In
health and my last accident drove me from
my trade. I eau not now refer to it wi*V
out a Hhudder. I waa running my train
with u new engine, No. 130, and wan K°' n K
nearly fifty mile* an hour. Far ahead on
the tr.u k, between the rail*, I saw Nome'
thing which 1 thought wa* a piece of nuw*-
p.t|n*r. A* I drew nearer, oh ! horror it
wa* a little child. It wo* sitting facing me
and playiug with the dirt uud stone*. 1 re
versed and tried to stop, but it was impossi
ble. As I gut nearer the little thing looked
III> and (*III|I|MNI its hands APPARENTLY in de
light at the big engine, aud in an iustaut
tlie jkouilcrous monster bad passed over it.
I almost fainted, but *top|M*l the train.
The Jieople went back. The jiuor little
thiug was ground to atoms. That was my
last trip. Thai child haunted Mte day aud
night. I was taken ill, aud when at last I
recovereii I resumed my skirts. You have
here in Bridgeport a man named Farini,
who so many years was 'Lulu' and electri
liod audlenore in Kurojie and America as a
licautiful and shapely young girl. At
Vihlo'a Garden 'Lulu* broke tlie hearts ami
won many favors from rich men. 'Lulu'
was hurled from the catapult. He was shot
out of a cannon. From concealed springs
on the stage at Niblo's he w as fire! to dizzy
heights, ami his graceful figure deceived the
poor deluded men into offers of marriage.
| 'Lulu' made a living by bis dUguis". Why
should not Ido the suine ? It is an even
exchange. liut I am done with my disguise,
for lam going to lie married. My afiianced
is a stationary engineer and has charge of a
sixty-horse jiower engine in one of the large
manufactories. After lam married I bojie
to IN* able to make a visit sometime to Eng
land and point out to my husband the 'Fly
ing Scotchman' where first I learned to run
upon a locomotive."
Mattie Morgans is but twenty-four years
old. She has light-colored banged hair,
large dark eyes, and is cjiilte handsome.
Her face approaches, ]M-rha]M, the mascu
line and has a determined expression of
character,yet withal it lights up with pleas
and smiles and Is*trays in unguarded mo
ments the gentler feelings of the weaker
sex.
The Largest Circulation.
What volume printed in the English lan
guage has had the largest circulation next
to the Bible? Give it up? Well, it is
Welister's sjielling book. Something over
50,000,000 copies of this work have been
published since it was first brought out in
Hartford, and the royalties which old Noah
Webster received on it were sufficient to
snpjiort bis family liamlsoiuely while he
was compiling his big dictionary. It is an
instrustive volume and we advise every
body to |eruse it,although as somebody said
of the dictionary, the story is somewhat dis-
OOnm-io.l. —/>w. ... i/..—i j
Congressional Nomenclature.}
There are some in teresting names found
in the list of the fiftieth congress. Curious
baptismal names atiouud. Among them
are Jehu, Hilary, Adonirain, Knute,
Cherubusco, Beriah, and Welty. There is
a Baker, a Fisher, a Weaver, a Cooper, a
Mason, a Glover, a Hunter, a Miller, a
Brewer, a Granger, a Turner, a Taylor, ami
a Sawyer. The colors represented are
White, Gray, and Brown. There is only
one Hogg among the memtiers. — Detroit
Free Pre*s.
• ♦♦♦
GRIEFS OF THE WEALTHY.
Random Notes Showing That Riches
I)o Not Always Make Happiness.
The life of fashion and wealth is
wearisome and dreary enough and
full of discontent if you will look un
der its glittering surface, remarks the
Philadelphia correspondent of the Chi
cago Tribune.
Did you ever think how pathetic
are the sorrows of the rich f
It seems natural that the poor
should suffer, but when you think
bow much mankind stands ready to
pay for wealth, there is something
pitiable in Ibo realization that, after
all, riches do not always make happi
ness. I realized the truth of this bit
of philosophy very keenly the other
day as I contemplated the cvery-day
existence of the two wealthiest women
in the United States. One was Mrs.
John and Jacob Astor, of New York,
the other was Mrs. Gammell.of Prov
idence, B. I. Perhaps you have seen
Mrs. Astor. She is a handsome
woman rather, with a great sweetness
and charm of manner. She was Miss
Gibbs, of North Carolina, and h&sjust
a shade of Southern accent, with all
the soft gracefulness of style which is
characteristic of tho beautiful women
of the South. Both she and Mrs.
Gammell were staying at a hotel at
Atlantic City, on the seashore, about
au hour and a half out ot town, where
almost all fashion has gone this
spring to build up, after the diversions
and dissipations of the winter. Her
gowns were extremely simple, and
she wore no jewelry at all. Her hus
band, as you know, is worth a hun
dred and fifty millions of dollars, and
of course is the richest individual in
the country. He is a stocky little
man, stout, self-willed, brusque, and
walks frequently with a limp, the coo
sequence of gout. He is rather taci
turn with strangen, and has a mortal
fear that because be is rich somebody
will succeed in getting possession of
his photograph and put it on sale like
au actor's. He was a soldier and has
the right to be called Colonel, having
served on McClell&n's staff, and per-
no. 22.
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.ilntf >
•'.'lll to Mm;
baps much of bis "ofiUbness'* is the
result of military discipline. Withal
be is eery kindly in kls own circle,is
a supporter and genuioe loyer of art
and music, and has his box in the
Metropolitan Opera-House. lie was
not to the seaside with bis wife, some
business engagements having kept
bim at home.
Mra Astor, of course, was the
cynosure of all observers. She had
many friends among the Pbiladelpbi
ans at the house, to whom indeed she
was like their own townsman, as her
sou is married to Miss May Paul of
this city, who, the Queea of Italy
once said,is the handsomest American
her Majesty had ever seen. She Was
not much In evidence, however, and
remained in her own room mostly all
the day. Her mother in New York
was extremely -Hlr wed *hs fear of
death was always before her eyes. At
last the blow came. Bbe waa at din.
ner in the public dining-room, when a
servant banded her a dispatch an
nouncing her mother's death. What
her grief was need not be said. She
controlled It nobly in the presence of
others. She desired now only one
thing—to reach her people in New
York. She sent out her servant to
engage a special train for her. The
ra an came back and told her be bad
not succeeded. She sent out another
and enlisted the clerks of tbe hotel in
ber behalf. Money was of no mo
ment. She would pay any price out
of her millions for the boon. But
there was failure all aronnd. The of
ficials of tbe road could not arrange
tbe matter, and so this poor woman
with ber useless wealth had to wait
boors in her sorrow for the regular
train through to New York.
Her companion in millions, Mrs.
Gammell, was also ber comrade in
sorrow. One scarcely ever caught a
a glimpse of her lace, all lined and
seamed by suffering. She bad just
lost ber favorite son, a bright boy of
eighteen or nineteen, and had come
to tbe seaside directly from his grave.
Occasionally one might see her black
robed figure with its sad face, flitting
along tbe corridor, but she seldom
left her room. Only sat with her
grief in its silence.
Sermons ?
Yes ; truly they are sermons.
I recalled on my way to the shore,
West End. There was no sign of
life in or about it, though doubtless
there was human existence within.
It was like a tomb; so massive, and
white, and still. It was the residence
of Mrs. Jayne, the widow of Dr. Dav
id Jayne, who made a fortune of sev
eral millions out of patent medicines.
When be first met the woman who
afterwards became his wife, then his
widow,she was in bis own employ .en
gaged in the exhilarating occupation
of wrapping circulars around bottles of
nostrums. He was then a widower
with children growing up, mad there
was some opposition on their p art of
the marriage. The marriage took
piece, however, just the same, and
Dr. Jayne began building his splendid
residence in the fashionable quarter.
Just asit was finished he died His
widow moved into it afterwards, bat
she has seen few happy days there-
The bouse is never lighted np for any
entertainment; no splendid company
ever gathers under its roof; no child
ish laughter rings through its richly
appointed rooms. The widow lives
there almost alone, save for her serv
ants.
It is said that when she wedded her
last husband there was a condition
imposed that after the marriage Bbe
would know none of her own family.
The will was quite in a line with such
a provision. While it imposed the
gpleudid residence on the widow it
made no adequate provision for the
support ot a style of living that would
be in harmony with the costliness and
luxury of the dwelling. So it is said
that Mr". Jayne while appearing 'to
live in regal solemnity, if not regal
magnificence,has juite as mnch difficul
ty iu making the ends meet as do
many of her old-time poor relations.
"When Baby was slok, gar* her Caatoria,
When *he w * Child, she cried for Cwtorim,
Whoa she became Mia*, *he clang to Caatoria,
When abe had Children, aba gare tbem Caatoria,
Rheumatism and Neuralgia eared ia*
S Daya
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compound which acts with truly marvelous
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gia. We guarantee it to cure any and ev
ery cases of acute Inflammatory Rheumatism
and Neuralgia in 2 DAYS, and to give imme
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cure.
On receipt of 30 cents, in two cent stamps, we
will send to any address the prescription for
this wonderful compound, which can be filled
by your home druggists at small cost. We
take this means of giving our discovery to the
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will gladly refund money if satisfaction is not
given. THE IKDIANA CHEMICAL CO..
4-ly Crawlorosville, Ind.