Lancaster farming. (Lancaster, Pa., etc.) 1955-current, August 12, 2000, Image 214

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    Penn State Ag
comer of Main
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Progress Paysl^r^lßn
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• 3 or 4 bedding stalls TTt
• Rough-sawn Exterior Plywood
• Galvanized steel roof
• Paint and spouting included [[[
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Controlled environment keeps calves healthier.!
ALLENSVILLE
LANING MILL
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ULENSVILLE PLANING MI
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UNIVERSITY PARK
(Centre Co.) This year, as
farmers and homeowners enjoy
the dizzying array of exhibits,
machinery and products at Ag
Progress Days, they’ll find it
easier to take a little bit of the
■exposition home with them.
For the first time in the his
tory of the event, visitors will be
permitted to make cash pur
chases at the individual booths
of participating exhibitors. Ac
cording to Bob Oberheim, mana
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108 E. MAIN STREET
ALLENSVILLE PA.
PHONE: (717) 483-6386
(800) 322-1306
Ag Progress Section 1, Lancaster Farming, Saturday, August 12, 2000—Page 17
Visitors Can Take Away
A Little Of Ag Progress
S'
'What mafgs our calf condo e%ceCa6ovt attotfiers?
1) It’s not just a shelter..its a shelter where you regulate
the air flow to suit the changeable seasons; and you
regulate the stalls to suit your calves!
2) Our condo is constructed of top quality, ail wood
Tl-11 exterior plywood siding which guarantees you
many years of continued reliable use.
3) More reasons our calf condo excels....galvanized
steel roofing, easy access feeders, feeder buckets,
spouting and paint are all included... they’re not
options.
Call UIC (ext. 146)
for additional
information and
Price Quotes .
ger of Ag Progress Days, it’s a
small change made for the con
venience of visitors and exhibi
tors.
“For the general public, it’s
obvious: they get to purchase
supplies or farm items as they
see them in use,” Oberheim ex
plains. “They may see an item
that they’ve been seeking for
some time something that’s
unique or beneficial to their op
eration. They can get it as they
see it, rather than order it later.
Also, it allows exhibitors to im-
Up to 9 stalls 4’ x &
Treated Skids
Yellow Pine Floor
W/ Rubber Mats
3” Sloped Floor
Herculite Ventilation
curtain
Wood brisket boards
i
i
mediately recoup some of the
cost of their participation in Ag
Progress Days.”
The change is a continuation
of Penn State’s desire to expand
the Ag Progress Days offerings
beyond field demonstrations,
Oberheim says.
“Over the last 10 years, we’ve
been working to diversify the
show into areas not represented
in the past,” he says. “We’re en
couraging exhibitors who deal
with many phases of the agricul
tural community or rural life:
equestrians, alternative agricul-
tural community or
rural life: equestrians,
alternative agricul
ture, horticulture and
farm safety, just to
name a few. The goal
is to attract exhibitors
and visitors who
haven’t attended in
the past.”
Exhibitors come
from all sections of the
U.S. and from
Canada, he says.
While commercial ex
hibitors provide much
of the operating
budget for the exposi
tion, they also help
support the youth and
family programs,
animal shows and
homeowner-oriented
attractions.
“We want to pro
mote what’s new in
commercial equip
ment and services, as
well as introduce the
latest agricultural
technology drawn
from university re
search,” Oberheim
says. “At the same
time, we present im
portant concepts in
family living and con
sumer services.”
On Wednesday,
Aug. 16, the skid-steer
rodeo for tractor oper
ators will return with
more manufacturers
represented than last
year. The general
public can register to
compete for prizes on
a supervised obstacle
course in a test of han
dling skills.
A new feature is the
farm equipment show
and-tell, which will
allow manufacturers
to promote and edu
cate visitors on new or
unconventional equip
ment. A daily after
noon show-and-tell
will be devoted to spe
cialty line equipment.
Other field demonstra
tions are planned, in
cluding mowing, grain
and corn planters (no
till and conventional),
and rakes and tedders.
Techniques for
growing vegetables in
high plastic tunnels,
high-moisture hay
baling and bale han
dling will round out
the daily demonstra
tions. Throughout the
exposition, workshops
and exhibits will pro
vide information on
current research-based
production technol
ogy, government pro
grams and educational