Lancaster farming. (Lancaster, Pa., etc.) 1955-current, October 24, 1998, Image 118

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    C2-Lancaster Farming, Saturday, October 24, 1998
UNIVERSITY PARK (Centre
Co.) —Fanners may harvest prof
its from scrap iron, steel and other
valuable metals contained in old
vehicles, equipment and products
that have not been removed from
the farm, according to two re
searchers in Penn State’s College
of Agricultural Sciences.
According to James Garthe, in
structor in agricultural engineer
ing, farmers can clean up their
Mid-Atlantic September Milk $16.77
ALEXANDRIA, Va. Mid
dle Atlantic Order Acting Market
Administrator David Z. Walker
recently announced a September
1998 weighted average milk price
of $16.77 per hundredweight
The weighted average differen
tial price was $1.59 per hundred
weight and the producer nonfat
milk solids (NFMS) price was 42
cents per pound.
The weighted average price was
up $1.44 from August and was
$3.78 higher than a year earlier.
The producer NFMS price was
down 59 cents from last Septem
ber.
The nonfat milk solids price,
applicable to handler payments,
was 42.59 cents per pound for the
We Now Accept Visa
Lancaster Farming
1 E Mam St
Ephrata, Pa 17522
717-394-3047
or l.ititz
717-626-1164
FAX 717-733-6058
PHONE HOURS
Mon , Tues,
Wed & Fn
Sam to 5 p m
Thurs
7am to 5 p m
OFFICE HOURS
Mongol Fn
Sam to 5 p m
The following categories
are available for your
classified advertising
In Section C Deadline
Thursday morning at 9 of each week's
publication
1 - Farm Equipment
1b - Speciality Farm Eq
2 ■ Farm Eq Wanted
The following categories
are available for your
classified advertising
in Section D Deadline
Wednesday afternoon at 5
of each week’s publication
1 a-Construction Equipment
3- and Unloaders
4- and Supplies
5- Equipment
6- Equipment
7- Equipment
8-
Ba-Exotic Animals
9- & Mules
10- & Goats
11-
12- Artificial Breeding
13- Eq & Supplies
14- S Supplies
14a-Ratites
15- & Seed
16-
17-
18- & Vegetables
19-
20- & Garden
21- Offered
22- Work
23- Wanted
24- Wanted
25- Opportunities
26-
27-
28-
29-
30-
31 -Notice
32-
32a-Antiques
33- Vehicles
34- •
35- & Trailers
36- Estate
‘Heavy Metal ’ Might Mean Profit On Older Farms
acreage and reap a small profit by
marketing their scrap metal to
interested dealers. “The amount of
money gained from selling scrap
metal is nowhere near enough to
retire on, but it will bring a decent
price if the metals are separated
and handled correctly,” Garthe
said.
Although farmers may not be
lieve they have enough metal to
make a cleanup worthwhile,
Garthe said, “farm steel,” a gener
month, down 59.13 cents from last
year.
The gross value of September
producer milk, adjusted to 3.4 per
cent butterfat was $78.2 million,
compared to $61.6 million a year
ago.
Mr. Walker said that producer
receipts totaled 470.8 million
pounds during Septembrer, a de
crease of 7.2 million pounds from
last September and the average
daily delivery of 3,347 pounds per
producer decreased 49 pounds or
1.4 percent from a year earlier.
A total of 4,689 producers sup
plied Order 4 handlers during the
month, a decrease of three from a
year ago.
Class I producer milk totaled
PLEASE WRITE CLEARLY
(. MAIL TO: |
LANCASTER FARMING h
i PO Box 609, Ephrata, PA 17522 i
k r'- A i» s —-S»V
NOTE: Please do not use this form for
Mail Box Market Ads, see instructions with Mailbox Markets
Name
Address
City
Zip
Please publish my
starting with the
#
□ Check Enclosed
□ Visa (13 or 16 numbers)
□ Mastercard (16 numbers) (Be sure to include all numbers)
□ Discover (16 numbers)
Card #
Exp. Date: Signature
Box Replies: Ads with answers coming to a box number, c/o
Lancaster Farming: $1.50 per ad per week additional.
This newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect
insertion of any advertisement.
CLASSIFIED AD ORDER BLANK
Phone (
.word ad times
issue. Classify under
I enclose
ic term for any scrap metal from
farmsteads, can add up quickly.
Salable metal items include aban
doned vehicles, old tractors and
equipment, engines, farm gates,
applicances, fencing, wire and
building materials.
“A typical farm easily can have
several tons of scrap metal,” said
Jennifer Shufran, research asso
ciate in agricultural engineering.
“Most farmers will not want to
plan an intensive cleanup. The
236.4 million pounds and was
down 12.1 million pounds, or 4.9
percent from last September.
Class I milk accounted for 50.22
percent of total producer milk re
ceipts during the month, com
pared with 52 percent in Septem
ber 1997.
The average NFMS test of pro
ducer milk was 8.62 percent,
down from 8.69 percent the pre
vious year. The average butterfat
test of producer milk was 3.59
percent, up from 3.56 percent in
September 1997.
Middle Atlantic Order pool
handlers reported Class I in-area
milk sales of 186.8 million pounds
during September, a decrease of
2.1 percent from a year earlier, af
ter adjustment to eliminate varia
tion due to calendar composition.
, Master Card
PLEASE CALL OUR CLASSIFIED AD
DEPT. IF YOU WANT TO ADVERTISE
A DISPLAY BOX IN OUR PAPER
State
(PHONE NUMBERS COUNT AS ONE WORD)
best approach, from a labor stand
point, is to pick up scrap metals
during winter down times, or as
you clear a field or work other
jobs on the farm.”
Shufran said the more initial
work the fanner does, the mote
profit is harvested from scrap met
al. “If you gather everything into a
pile and call the scrap dealer to
pick it up, you’ll make money,”
she said. “But you can get much
better prices from dealers if you
separate each type of scrap metal,
and an even higher price if you
haul each separated pile to the
dealer,”
Uartfae lists different metals and
a few products made from those
metals in an approximate descend
ing order of value.
• Copper: Wire (worth more
with insulation removed) and
plumbing pipes.
• Brass; Wire, plumbing fit
tings, radiator cores.
• Aluminum: Farm gates, roof
ing, siding, engine components.
• Stainless steel: Tanks, fittings,
bolts.
• Bulk steel: Rods, pipes, struc
tural components, shafts, gears,
pulleys, chains.
• Sheet metal: Siding, drums.
• Cast iron: Bathtubs, transmis
sions, gearcases, wheel hubs.
• Zinc: Handles, fixtures and
various castings.
Garthe emphasizes that large
and small items should be dis
mantled if they are made from dif
ferent metals. Cars, however,
usually are taken without any dis
mantling.
Shufran suggests farmers estab-
& Discover
I CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES ?
0 49$ per word per week -1 or 2 times $
K 44$ per word per week - 3 or more times h
\ 11 word minimum \
Words 1 Time 2 Times 3 Times i
A up to 11 5.39 10.78 14.52 f
> 12 5.88 11.76 15.84 4
\ 13 6.37 12.74 17.16 \
% 14 6.86 13.72 18.48 i
t 15 7.35 14.70 19.80 f
1 16 7.84 15.68 21.12
\ 17 8.33 16.66 22.44 >
\ 18 8.82 17.64 23.76 \
(■ 19 9.31 18.62 25.0 S *
j 20 9.80 19.60 26.40 f
SECTION D - WEDNESDAY AT 4:00 P.M.
SECTION C - THURSDAY AT 9:00 A.M.
OF EACH WEEK’S PUBLICATION
lish a long-range plan for collect
ing scrap metal, encouraging
employees and family members to
collect and separate metals as they
tackle other jobs.
“Most scrap metal is scattered
over the farm and along field
edges,” she said. “Fanners should
establish a central staging area to
collect and separate the metal,
then add to it over time until the
farm has been cleaned up.”
Garthe suggests looking in the
Yellow Pages under “Scrap Met
al” or “Scrap Yards” to find deal
ers that evaluate a farm’s scrap
metal.
“In the scrap business it pays to
shop around for prices,” Shufran
said. “Some scrap dealers may pay
double what another pays for the
same metal. If you’re hauling the
metal yourself, it can really make
a difference in price.”
Garthe also points out that
farmers should clean up their
scrap metal if needed, removing
plastics, glass, rubber, insulation
and draining all fluids, such as oils
or gasoline, from equipment.
“Some materials may require a
certified professional to remove
it,” Garthe said. ‘Tor example, a
heating, ventilation and air-condi
tioning technician must remove
CFC refrigerants from refrigera
tors, freezers and bulk milk tanks
before they can be sold.”
“Cleaning up scrap metal has
incentives other than money,”
Shufran said. “It increases the val
ue of the farm, makes the farm
safer for workers, children and
neighbors, and improves animal
safety and health.”
DEADLINES: