Lancaster farming. (Lancaster, Pa., etc.) 1955-current, October 15, 1994, Image 48

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    88-Lancaster Farming, Saturday, October 15, 1994
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If you are looking for a recipe but can’t find it, send
your recipe request to Lou Ann Good, Cook’s Question
Comer, In care of Lancaster Farming, P.O. Box 609, Eph
rata, PA 17522. There’s no need to send a SASE. If we re
ceive an answer to your question, we will publish It as
sooh as possible.
Answers to recipe requests should be sent to the same
address.
QUESTION —Sandra Tabor, North East, Md., would like a
recipe for rice pudding cooked in the microwave.
QUESTlON—Geraldine Kraft, York, would like a recipe for
breadsticks.
QUESTION Mary Ream, Elverson, would like a recipe
for vanilla fudge.
QUESTION A Lancaster County reader would like a
recipe for pepper jelly made with Karo or white corn syrup.
QUESTION—D. Newsom, Cooperstown, N.Y., lost one of
her favorite cookbooks. She would like the following recipes
to replace those she lost: lobster or crabmeat dip that is very
delicate and has few ingredients, strawberry shortcake with a
cooked frosting, and Spiedie Marinade for meat.
QUESTION Dixie Fix, Harrisonville, would like a recipe
for bananas in red syrup like that served by Ponderosa and
Shoney’s breakfast and salad bars.
QUESTION Do any readers have a recipe for home
made ice cream made from potatoes?
QUESTION Dianna Cook, Elmer, N.J., would like a
recipe for pickled hot peppers.
QUESTION Dianna Cook, Elmer, N.J., would like a
recipe for pumpkin fudge.
QUESTION A Chester County reader wants to know if
wine or brandy can be made from pears.
QUESTION A reader is looking for a recipe called cab
bage strudel.
QUESTION LaFaye Burkholder, Fredericksburg, would
like to know how to dry sunflower seeds and also how to wash
them. Should the seeds be taken off the head to dry?
QUESTION Lena Grill, Reamstown, would like recipes
for crab apple jelly or jam.
QUESTION Phyllis Baldner, St. Thomas, wants a recipe
for V-8 Juice because she misplaced one she had clipped
from the newspaper. She needs it immediately to use the last
pickings of tomatoes.
QUESTION Isaac Kirk Sr., Silver Spring, Md., wrote that
he misplaced the recipe for turtle soup that he had clipped
from this paper. It appeared about two years ago and had
come from a restaurant in New Orleans. We do not keep a file
copy of these recipes. If you clipped the recipe, please send a
copy for us to reprint.
QUESTION G.E-Ross, Douglassville, writes that he
found a grove of paw paw trees when their goats munched
down an area overgrown with weeds. He has eaten the paw
paws raw and thought perhaps some elderly folks would have
some paw paw recipes for the young folk to enjoy.
QUESTION Gwen Webster, Glen Rock, would like a
recipe for grape bars. She had purchased some at the Grape
Festival in Naples, N.Y. The bars were delicious with a gra
ham cracker crumb crust with fruit on the top.
QUESTION V. M. of Waynesboro, wants a recipe for
sweet pickled peppers. Her idea is to strip the peppers and eat
them on steaks, subs, hamburgers or a side dish. She had
them at a sub shop where the owner made them himself but
did not want to share his recipe.
QUESTION Aida Mothes, Renick, W.V., writes that she
was in Norway, a quick bread that was often served in restaur
ants was a fruit or nut bread that was very moist. She would
like the recipe.
Cook’s
Question
Corner
ANSWER Martha Bixler, Marietta, wanted to know
where to purchase the book, ‘The Art of Pa. Dutch Cooking,”
by Edna Eby Heller. Mrs. Willis Shenk, Lititz, writes that the
cookbooks are available at Provident Book Store, Lancaster,
and at the People's Place, Intercourse.
ANSWER —Doris Heggenstaller, Loganton, sent a recipe
requested for Sawdust Pudding. Also, Ida Risser, Leola, sent
one for Indian Pudding that she thought might be wanted.
Sawdust And Woodchlp Pudding
Bake one box yellow cake mix as directed on package. Set
aside and cool completely. Break cake into small pieces
(wood chips).
Place Vi to 1 cup pine nuts or English walnuts in ungreased
skillet and toast lightly. Remove from skillet and cool. Take
half of cold nuts and grind them. This is ‘sawdust.”
Make your favorite pudding. When made, use a few nuts
and stir into the pudding. Layer the bottom of your serving
bowl with some warm pudding mixture. Quickly add a layer of
wood chips and top with remaining pudding layer. Cover top
with whipped cream (optional). Sprinkle top with some finely
ground nuts (sawdust).
If you don’t use whipped topping, sprinkle nuts on each
serving.
’/«cup corn meal
3 tablespoons cornstarch
5 cups milk
’/« cup molasses
Vt teaspoon salt
Vi cup brown sugar
'/«teaspoon ginger
% teaspoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon butter
2 eggs
Mix corn meal and cornstarch with one cup milk. Scald the
remaining milk in a double boiler and over hot water. Add corn
meal and other ingredients except eggs. When thickened,
add beaten eggs.
ANSWER—For the reader who wanted a recipe for cream
of celery soup, here is one from Rachel Seller, New Provi
dence.
Cream Of Celery Soup
Cook together until the vegetables are soft (the softer, the
easier to puree).
12 cups chopped celery stalks and leaves
2 medium onions
16 cups water or chicken broth (1 chicken bouillon cube per
2 cups water may be used)
2 tablespoons herb mixture
1 tablespoon salt
Puree with food mill, put in kettle. Add IV4 cups flour made
to a paste with 1 cup water and 1 cup celery juice, cooking
until boiling and put in jars.
May be frozen or canned. Water bath for 30 minutes or
steam pressure for 10 pounds for 10 minutes.
To use as a soup, add 3 cups milk to one pint soup.
ANSWER Louise Graybeal, Renick, W.Va., wanted a
recipe for the syrup that goes with sourdough cinnamon buns,
made by Mary Clark. Thanks to Sarah Clark, Breezewood, for
sending the recipe.
Syrup For Cinnamon Buns
1 cup brown sugar
3 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons butter
Beat together until butter is melted. Pour intO*pans. Cut
dough and lay in syrup. Bake at 375 to 400 degrees for 15 to
20 minutes. Turn pan upside down as soon as they are taken
out of the oven.
ANSWER Louise Graybeal, Renick, W.Va., wanted
recipes for light pancake syrup. Thanks to Sarah Clark,
Breezewood, for sending one.
Pancake Syrup
1% cups brown sugar
3 /« cup granulated sugar
'A cup molasses or corn syrup
1 cup water
1 teaspoon vanilla
Maple flavoring
Bring the sugar, molasses and water to a boil, stirring con
stantly. Simmer on low heat for five minutes.Jtemove from the
heat and add vanilla.
ANSWER Helen Spencer, Hopewell, N.J., wanted to
<now where to purchase molds to make clear toy candy.
Thanks to Nancy Frey, Annville, and others who suggested
the following: Cake and Kandy Emporium at the Village Com
mons, 2019 Miller Rd., East Petersburg, PA 17520-1624;
Knepp's Caramel Corn at Root’s Market, Manheim, on Tues
day, and at Green Dragon Market, Ephrata, on Friday.
CLARIFICATION Several readers asked how many
apples should be used in the recipe for Canned Apple Pie Fill
ing that was published in the Sept. 17 issue. Frances Smith
who submitted the recipe did not give an exact amount, but
said that quart jars should be filled one-third full with the juice
mixture and then filled with apple slices and pour in more juice
to fill the spaces between the apples. You will need approxi
mately four cups of apples slices for each quart.
Indian Pudding
Catch
The
Taste
(Continued from Pago B 6)
DILLED SALMON
1 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon lemon juice
41 -inch thick halibut, salmon or
tuna steaks
2 tablespoons finely chopped
fresh dill or /* teaspoon dried dill
weed
'A cup whipping cream
'A teaspoon flour
1 tablespoon minced green
onion
White pepper and salt
Dill sprigs and lemon wedges
for garnish
Place butter in shallow dish
large enough to hold all four
steaks. Microwave at high 30 sec
onds to melt; stir ip lemon juice.
Place fish in dish; turn to coat both
sides. Arrange steaks with tthe
thickest part of the outside of dish.
Sprinkle each with a little dill.
Cover dish with plastic wrap; vent
' one comer. Microwave at high 3
minutes; rotate dish a half turn.
Microwave 3 to 5 minutes longer
or until the surface of fish is
opaque, but center is still slightly
translucent. Pour off cooking liq
uid into 4-cup measure. Cover fish
with plastic wrap and let stand
while preparing sauce. Mix cream
and flour; stir in cooking liquid;
add green onion and remaining
dill. Microwave at high 3 minutes
or until mixture boils and thickens
slighdy. Season to taste with pep
per and salt. After standing, fish
should be opaque throughout and
just ready to flake. Microwave a
few seconds longer if necessary.
Place fish on heated platter or
plates and pour dill sauce over to
serve. Garnish with dill springs
and lemon wedges if desired.
Makes 4 servings.
SHARK SALAD
In large saucepot, place about 2
pounds shark fillets in single layer;
sprinkle with salt and pepper. Add
enough white wine to cover fillets.
Bring to a boil. Cover; reduce heat
to simmer. Cook 10 minutes for
each one-inch thickness of fish.
Drain; cool and break into bite
sized pieces. Stir together V> cup
each mayonnaise and sour cream,
1 tablespoon each Dijon mustard
and lemon juice, and dash df white
pepper. In large bowl, combine
cooked fish, 1 diagonally-sliced
carrot, 1 chopped red pepper and
'A cup broccoli florets. Add dress
ing; toss lighdy to coat fish and
vegetables. Serve in lettuce-lined
bowls. Gam with chopped freh
dill. Serves 4.
BROILED RAINBOW TROUT
WITH HONEY MUSTARD
GLAZE
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons
honey
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon
chopped fresh parsley
Salt and ground black pepper to
taste
4 rainbow trout fillets,
butterflied
Preheat broiler. Combine frist
four ingredients; season with salt
and pepper. Lightly oil baking
sheet Place trout fillets skin-side
down on sheet; brush with honey
mustard glaze. Broil 3 minutes, or
until trout turns opaque. Serve
immediately. Makes 4 savings.