Lancaster farming. (Lancaster, Pa., etc.) 1955-current, June 04, 1977, Image 129

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stoltzfus meat market
riKTOM BEEF BUTCHERING
Our Own Corn Fed Beef
Right From The Farm
-FRESH BEEF AND PORK
OUR OWN HOME MADE
SCRAPPLE A FRESH SAUSAGE
Bacon add Country Cured Hams
Orders taken for freezer Meats
PH. 768-3941
Directions : 1 block east of Intercourse
on Rt 772 - Newport Road
STORE HOURS m tl
THE SENTINEL
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Goats and Kids in Texas. ..
' Li stark contrast to the
dwindling sheep population,
the Texas inventory of goats
and kids registered a 16 per
cent increase during 1976.
The Crop Reporting Board
estimates total goats and
kids (Hi band as of January 1,
1977, at 1.3 million.
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Dairy farms today have
become super-automated,.
with machines, motors, and
the push of buttons doing
many of the tedious, time
consuming chores of
Grandpa’s day.
Sometimes I wander,
though, when the third motor
in a week has gone up in
smoke, breaker switches are
doing just that (breaking),
and we begin buying fuses by
the dozen, whether the
mechanical marvels we
maintain as slaves haven’t
instead turned the tables,
enslaving us gullible gadget
collectors.
See your dealer about the Sentinel—or drop us a tine
PO. Box 433
Elizabethtown, PA 17022
Kings of the dairy farm
electrical apparatus are
probably the milking
machines and that
marvelous, gaping-mouthed
refrigeration unit biown as a
milk tank.
The depths of a milk tank
are fascinating, with that
beautiful white liquid
•slowly stirring and cooling
down there. Our entire lives,
and pocketbooks, center
around that big stainless
steel hulk performing its job
of cooling the milk
production to perfection on
its way to the bottling plant.
But, like humans, milk
Round-the-clock
guardian of
stored milk
temperature
If you depend upon your milk check for a living,
protect that income by insuring milk quality.
The least expensive, single-payment insurance
obtainable is the Sentinel the heavy-duty,
10-inch recorder which charts round-the-clock
temperature of your milk-cooling or holding tank.
Assure yourself and your processor that
proper milk temperature is always maintained.
Keep a permanent log of compressor operation
and tank coding or pre-cooling efficiency, from
first filling to pickup.
Cleaning temperatures increasingly ques
tioned by sanitarians—are recorded on the same
chart
At little added cost, the Sentinel is available with
provision for actuating an alarm or warning light if
milk hddlng temperature rises above pre-set level
Remember—if it prevents the loss of only one
tank of milk, die Sentinel has paid its own way.
Q PARTLOW
r-ro- j .Xr.'3 —4;;--;- i or* r
Lancaster Farming, Saturday, June 4.1977—129
tanks sometimes wake up on
the wrong side of the bed.
For no reason at all, the
compressor motor goes on
strike or the agitator
stubbornly refuses to
perform its ring-around-the
rosey dance.
During our first years of
milking here at Bupplynn
Farms, I recall one night
when for some reason the
cooler didn’t cool. However,
the stirrer continued to stir.
Guess what we had the next
morning? Beautiful little
islands of golden butter,
floating in a sea of skim
milk. It was great for toast,
but hard on the butterfat test
for the day.
Other times it takes an
opposite turn. For instance,
the cooler has occasionally
worked overtime,
refrigerating in a frenzy.
That generally gives the
milk truck driver a surprise
when he opens the lid to take
a sample.
“Popsicles!” he
pronounces, confronted with
a two-inch coating of ice
lurking inside the tank. Milk
is best served ice cold,
anyway.
But, however the tank
decides to put injts bid for
attention, it will undoubtedly
happen just after the evening
milking, when neighborhood
refrigeration repair men are
charging overtime for after
hours calls. Holiday
weekends are always
favorite breakdown targets,
too.
So no matter when the tank
catches chills or fever, we
can count on dropping
everything else and sitting
with the sick patient until it’s
been doctored back to health
again.
at Buck
(Continued from Page 126]
8; 3. Gary Mills, M-44 with
427 Chevy, 229-9.
5000-Pound
Super Stock
1. Tim Stauffer, Ephrata,
Deutz 8006, full pull, 234-8; 2.
Dale Smoker, Cochranville,
ACIBO, full pull, 150-4; 3.
James Ringler, Berlin,
IHSGO, 294-7.
9000-Pound
Open
1. Lester Houck, Kinzers,
two 440 Dodges, 288-2; 2.
John Ferry, Westport,
Mass., two 427 Chevys, 287-1;
3. Tom Middleton,
1H1066,286-10.
700-Pound
Modified
1. John Ferry, 265-10; 2.
Lester Houck, 257-3; 3. Greg
Manners, Ringoes, N.J.,
M 55, 249-4.
7000-Pound
Super Stock
1. Tony Stauffer, New
Holland, Deutz 9006,292-4; 2.
Tim Stauffer, Ephrata, Pa.,
Deutz 8006, 268-0; 3. Marlin
Brubaker, Quarryville, Pa.
ACD-21, 256-8.
Strip tests prove it Cattle
prefer Pioneer ® brand sor
ghum-sudangrass over
other brands. That means
they’ll eat more .... make
more meat or milk. Unbeat
able hot-weather pasture or
green-chop. Can be planted
on diverted acres
Treat your cattle to the
sorghum-sudangrass hybrid
they like best 988!
SEE or CALL
YOUR PIONEER DEALER
m.
PIONEER
SORGHUM
Pioneer is a brand name, numbers
identify varieties. * Registered trade
mark of Plonker Hi-Bred International.