Lancaster farming. (Lancaster, Pa., etc.) 1955-current, July 12, 1975, Image 64

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    —Lancaster Farml
64
Agricultural progress
result of 100-year effort
Alexis de Tocqueville, the
famous Frenchman who
traveled widely in America
in the first hall of the 1800’s,
had a great batting average
for telling It like it was.
But as the U.S. goes, he
missed the mark when he
said “Agriculture is
perhaps, of all the useful
arts, that which improves
most slowly among
democratic nations.”
In his day farmers tiUed
their crops and cared for
their livestock in traditional
ways. Although there were
FEATURING:
• Anti-Vibration Systems
• Automatic Oiling on All Models
40 Years Experience in Design
and Production
cl oh " L
utauffer
REPAIR SERVICE
R.D.2, East Earl, PA
Phone 215-445-6175
•A MILE NORTH OF GOODVILLE
ON UNION GROVE ROAD
A & B Sales & Service
l Miles South of Route 23 Along 772 thru Monterey
R.D.I, RONKS, PA
July 12. 1975
Saturda
signs of change - the in*
ventions of the moldboard
plow, the cotton gin, and the
reaper, for example - far
mers still were slower to
change than businessmen or
industrialists of that period.
Hard to predict. We can
forgive de Tocqueville for his
lack of foresight regarding
this one area. Indeed, few
could have detected in the
agriculture of the mid-1800’s
the sparks of the
technological explosion that
would revolutionize farming
100 years later.
DAVE'S
ENGINE
SERVICE
In Rear of Stauffer’s
Machine Shop
% Mile South of Murrell
on Pleasant Valley Road
R.D.3, Ephrata, PA
Perhaps the greatest
change is in the minds of
farmers themselves, who
eagerly seize and apply new
technologies as fast as they
leave the laboratories; new
varieties, new fertilizers,
new pesticides and her
bicides, new systems of
cultivation, new
management techniques.
They welcome with equal
enthuisasm new research
findings concerning new
uses for farm products, more
efficient marketing and
distribution, and improved
technologies in tran
sportation, storage, and
processing.
This change didn’t just
happen. It was the direct
payoff from a unique and
massive effort over a 100-
year period that created a
vast network of agricultural
research and educational
institutions.
Among farmers’ contact
points for research in
formation are the county
extension offices in nearly
all 3,044 counties in the 50
States, Puerto Rico, Guam,
and the District of Columbia.
Eash is staffed with one or
more full-time professional
agriculturists and home
economists. ' The 11,500
county workers are
backstopped by 4,500 State
extension professionals. A
small Federal office in
USDA services and coor
dinates the State offices.
Extension helpers. In
recent years, the Extension
Services have employed a
growing number of para
professionals who help
disseminate information on
nutrition, health, and family
living to poor people in rural
and urban areas. In addition,
the services use a legion of
unpaid, trained, volunteer
local leaders.
Research information also
reaches farmers and the
public through the press,
radio, and television. Ad
vertising is another means
by which agribusiness firms
communicate with farmers
and others. Supplier firms
themselves are also im
portant distributors of new
knowledge.
Research findings flow
into this information net
work from a variety of
sources.
First in research. Largest
of the public research
agencies is USDA’s
Agricultural Research
Service (ARS). It operates
127 separate research
establishments,' including
the Agricultural Research
Center at Beltsville, Md.,
and laboratories in each of
the States, Puerto Rico, the
Virgin Islands, and several
foreign countries. ARS also
conducts research in
cooperation with, or under
contracts or grants with,
State agricultural ex
periment stations, State
departments of agriculture,
and other groups both public
and private.
Other USDA research
agencies include the
Economic Research Service,
the Forest Service, and the
Farmer Cooperative Ser
vice. Statistics on
agricultural production and
other subjects are collected
by the Statistical Reporting
Service.
(Continued on Pace 65]
YOU CAN COUNT ON US
AGRI-EQUIP. I. G.'s AG. SALES
R Dh. Farmersville Ephrata. PA Rt 113 Box 200, Silverdale PA
717-354-4271 215-257-5135
ROY 0. CHRISTMAN LANDIS BROTHERS
RDI (Shartlesville) Hamburg PA 19526 1305 Manheim Pike P 0 Box 484
215-562 : 7218 or 215 488 1904 Lancaster PA 717-393 3906
DEPENDABLE MOTOR CO. HENRY S. LAPP
East Mam Street Honey Brook PA RDI Cams Gap PA 17527
215-273-3131 717-442-8134
ERB & HENRY EQUIP., INC. CARL L. SHIRK
22-26 Henry Avenue. New Berlmville, PA 5 Colebrook Road, Lebanon PA
215-367-2169 717-274-1436
GRUMELLI FARM SERVICE M. E. SNAVELY
Robert Fulton Highway Quarryville, PA 455 South Cedar Street, Lititz, PA
717-786-7318 717-626-8144
WEAVER STAR SILO INC.
RD4, Myerslown, PA
717-866-5709
GAP AUCTION
fiuday evenm, my is, ists
6:00 P.M.
Located off Route 41 • Lancaster Avanuo Opposite Turkey Hlfl Mlnil
Morkti • Cross RR Bridge
ANTIQUES AND HOUSEHOLD GOODS
SOLD AT EVERY AUCTION.
Inspection Friday from 9:00 a.m. until sate time.
CONSIGNMENTS ON MONDAYS OTHER DAYS BY APPOINTMENT
FROM 1:00 A.M. TO 7:00 P.M. Call us for pick up service.
IRA STOLTZFUS I SON, Auctioneers
442-4936 or 442-8254
CONDUCTORS ALL TYPES PUBLIC SALE
GLICK'S
Distributor for
ROOFING S SPOUTING
BAKED ENAMEL Ti ROOFS
Colors; Turquoise, Tan, Red, White
ALSO BAKED ALUMINUM
Colors; Green, White, Tan, Red.
FULL SERVICE DEALER
SALES & INSTALLATION
SAMUEL B. CLICK
R.D.I, Kinzer, PA Ph.(717)442-4921
Please call before 7 A.M.
or after 6 P.M.