Lancaster farming. (Lancaster, Pa., etc.) 1955-current, May 24, 1975, Image 60

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    —Unvjster Farming. Saturday. May 24. 1975
60
Farm Women
Societies
Society 3
Farm Women Society 3
met May 17 at the home of
Mrs, Vernon Lelnlnger,
Denver R 2.
On June 18 members and
their children wiU travel to
Gettysburg for a tour. June
30 the Silver Haired Mem
bers will be entertained at
the Glenn Eshelman
production at the Lancaster
Bible College and also a
luncheon.
Members will prepare the
Chicken corn soup and
chicken sandwiches which
will be sold at the Ephrata
Community Hospital Lawn
Fete June 7.
The following con
tributions were made $5O to
the Lancaster Hemophilia
Fund; $lOO to a local resident
who is a victim of
Hemophilia and $5O to the
Lancaster County Cancer
Society.
Mrs. Jay Miller reported
on the Spring Rally of the
State Farm Women which
was recently held at the
Hershey Convention Center.
Mrs. Ivan Everly reported
on the visit to Society 17 on
May 1.
Mrs. Roy Weinbold
demonstrated the art of
drying flowers she also
showed how dry materials
can be used in pictures and
permanent arrangements.
Several door prizes of dried
flower pictures were
awarded by Mr. Weinhold.
The next meeting will be
June 21 at the Schoeneck
Firemans Field. Mrs. Earl
Latshaw will be the hostess.
The program will be Miss
Anne Hinkle from the Ex
tension service her topic will
be food safety.
Society 8
Farm Women Society 8
met in the Lutheran Church,
Maytown on May 17th at 2
p.m. with Mrs. Grace Bizler,
President in charge. In the
absence of Mrs. Florence
Musser devotions were in
charge of Mrs. Alice Myers.
The main feature of the
afternoon was given by Mrs.
Kathryn Heisey who showed
Clay offers you the complete sys
tern a dairy confinement in
stallation that lets you double your
herd size without extra tune or
added labor
A Clay Herringbone Milking Parlor
with Dribble Metered Feeding
can handle up to 100 cows in
under 2 hours Clay’s liquid ma
nure system, silo unloader and
bunk feeder cut time and labor
Easier animal handling with fret
stalls saves bedding, also reduces
disease and udder damage
Clay’s Push Button Farming will
increase your profit Ask us for
details on a complete installation
AY Ml. HORS
R D 1 Lebanon, Pa
Ph (717)274 1242
Commercial Refrigeration
24 Hr Service
WW DOLE*
slides of a recent trip to
Mexico. Mrs. Kathryn Erb
who accompanied her had
items on display which she
brought with her. They were
on a Lincoln Bus Tour and
saw many Interesting sights
as they moved about on land.
The culture and art is quite
unique. The Palace of fine
Arts, Library, Floating
Gardens and Cathedrals
were seen. Poverty was
evident in the mountainous
terrain. Various trees in
cluded coffee, banana,
Joshua, and much cactus
along the mountains.
Acapulco markets and the
water cruise were enjoyed.
Kathy Hay sang a solo and
led the group in singing
several numbers. Beth
Drager accompanied on the
piano. Twenty two members
and three visitors were
present. Many places of
interest were mentioned as
each one named the place
she most enjoyed to see
while traveling; this was
response to Roll Call.
Mary Grace Martin read
the minutes and Elizabeth
Shuman gave the
Treasurer’s Report. Teen
Challenge sent a thank you
for a money gift sent them.
Mrs. Evelyn Russell wished
Kl'lßiWU'giUl FERMENTABLE FEED
WHAT CAN BE THE ADVANTAGES OF HARVESTING AND STORING ALFALFA AS Dtt-PRUV-ALL
ALFALFA HAYLAGE OVER BALED HAY ON AN ACRE BASIS?
These projections are based on figures from U.S.D.A., “Feeds and Feeding” by Morrison, “Applied
Animal Nutrition” by Crampton and Harris, Nutritional Bulletins from N.R.C., and Triple S Lab, Inc.
Results will obviously vary in individual cases. Figures for pounds of meat and milk per acre assume
that the alfalfa is being fed in a balanced ration.
Lbs. Dry Matter Harvested per acre
Field and Handling Losses
Lbs. Dry Matter Stored
Storage Losses
Lbs, Dry Matter to Feed
Feeding Losses
Lbs. Dry Matter Consumed
Lbs. Protein Consumed per acre 18 2%
Lbs. TDN Consumed per acre g l%
Lbs. Beef per acre
Value of Beef at /lb.
Lbs. Milk per acre
Value of Milk (a) $5.00/cwt
IM-PRUV-ALL IS A SCIENTIFIC COMBINA
TION OF INGREDIENTS THAT AID NATURE
IN ACHIEVING AN EFFICIENT, RAPID FER
MENTATION OF FERMENTED FEEDS
IM-PRUV-ALL HAS BEEN DESIGNED TO IM
PROVE FERMENTABLE FEEDS. OVER ONE
MILLION TONS OF VARIOUS SILAGES WERE
FERMENTED WITH IM-PRUV-ALL DURING
ITS DEVELOPMENT PERIOD.
The following specific IM-PRUV-ALL formulas
have been developed to afford maximum im
provement of different fermented feeds:
#lOl Corn and #H44 Haylage
Sorghum
#202 Legumes
#303 Grasses
In addition to improving standard silages
such as corn, IM-PRUV-ALL makes it possible
to direct cut and successfully ensile alfalfa,
clover, sudan, oats, wheat, sudex, pasture
grasses, beet tops, and others.
to transfer her membership
from Soc. 1 to this Society.
Installation procedure took
place.
Refreshments were
provided by hostess Anna
Mae Derr, Gladys Ney,
Sylvia Warfel, Ruth Folty
and Lizzie Keener,
The next meeting will be
held at the home of Mrs.
Irwin Cinder, Mt. Joy, R 2,
June 21st. at 2 p.m. Charles
Heaps will speak on the Art
of Rose growing.
Society 12
Farm Women Society 12
entertained Society 29 at the
Farm and Home Center
recently. Mrs. Elisc Shenk
had the devotions with roll
call being a favorite spot in
Pa. Society 12 will entertain
Society 26 on Thursday May
22 at the Gimbel’s Com
munity Center at Park City.
Mrs. Doris Thomas gave a
demonstration of desserts
for the program.
Members will be touring
Lancaster County on June
11.
Society 14
Farm Women Society 14
recently enjoyed a
progressive dinner to note
mother - daughter
celebrations. The appetitzer
which was fruit cup was
served at the home of Mrs.
Amos Ranck with the salad
being served in the home of
Mrs. John Hershey. Mrs.
Charles Leaman served the
main course which consisted
of creamed turkey on pattie
Would you like to make more money from the
ALFALFA you grow?
#GSS Grain
#BT66 Beet Tops
#DH77 Dry Hay
shells with peas, rolls and
cranberry sauce. The last
course was served at the
First Presbyterian Church in
Strasburg and consisted of
cake and Ice cream for
dessert.
Speaker for the evenings
program was Mrs. Isaac N.
Miller who took the women
on an armchair tour of
Africa.
The next meeting will be
June 11 at the Bethany Hall
of the Calvary Fellowship
House, 502 Elizabeth Ave.,
Lancaster. Society 14 will be
entertaining Society 31.
Society 15
Members, families and
firends of Farm Women
Society 15 enjoyed a family
feast supper at Historic
Strasburg on May 15. The
evening was planned by the
entertainment committee
and was in charge of the
committee chairlady, Nancy
Lefever. Devotions preceded
the dinner.
Musical entertainment
was provided by Bonnie
Wagner accompanied by her
sister Dawn Avis. A barber
shop quartet called the
Stylists also presented
several musical numbers.
Millie Rinehart talked on
mothers and Bonnie Wagner
and Douglas Bushong
presented some highlights in
song.
Special awards included a
white orchid corsage which
went to Mrs. Dorothy
Johnson and flowers were
presented to the oldest
Bto 8 to pS?v ah 60% Molsture
C« A11 Im-Pmv-All
Alfalfa Silage Alfalfa Haylage
10,000
10,000
1,200
8,800
12%
8,800
1,600
5,368
910
$227.50
10,395
$519.75
Wheat silage is a very good source of protein. If cut and ensiled at
81886 9 f it can have as much as 24 percent
protein. It can go into the silo direct-cut or as dry as 50 percent
moisture if treated with Im-Pruv-All. y percent
For more information, contact your
ROBERT KREIDER
So. Lane. County
717-569-6042
RAY WEILER
N. Lane. Co.
717-733-4302
808 SMITH
Adams County
717-528-4383
MARTY STEWART
Perry, Juniata-Cumberland Co’s.
717-766-9307
mother present, Mrs.
Gertrude Welcksel, the
youngest mother present,
Sandra Rinehart, mother
with the most children
present - Caroline Hershty
and mother with the oldest
child present • Effie Wagner.
Mother with the most
daughters - Dorothy John
son; mother with the most
grandaughters • Mary
Howett; mother with the
youngest child present -
Carolyn Hershey.
Society 18
Farm Women Society 18
had a most enjoyable af-
10,000
"§4OO
660
7%*
8,740
8,740
1,625
4,980
18.6%
57%
655
$163.55
9,130
$456.50
Im-Pruv-All Dealer
Marlin's
LIMESTONE
Be sure you apply enough
The new higher powered fertilizers often require
more lime each application to maintain a neutral
soil that tests to pH7.
iVAKM M. MARTIN, INC.
Blue Ball, Pa. 354 4125
Gap, Pa. 442-4148
40% Moisture
Alfalfa Haylage
10,000
1,300
sm
610
8,090
10,000
22.4% 2,240
7,760
280
7,480
0 5% 380
13%
7%*
8,090
18.0% 1,456
54% 4,370
532
$133.00
7,645
$382.25
CLARENCE WEILER
Lebanon Co.
717-866-6710
MARC LEHMAN
E. York Co.
717-252-2217
RICHARD BRECKBILL
Chester Co.
215-932-3307
NORMAN BROUSE
Union & Snyder Counties
717-524-5454
tomoon recently at the home
of Mri. John Henry Heta.
Mr*. Robert B. Noll had
appropriate devotion* for
Mother's Day. Roll call was
answered by telling your
"Most practiced economy."
$5O was donated toward
the piano for Farm and
Home Center and $O.OO was
given for Faye Stoner’s
IFYF program.
Mrs. Roy Sauder
decorated three cakes most
beautifully for the program.
Mrs. Ralph Martin will be
our hostess June 21 at 1:30
p.m.
Baled
Hay
3.6%*
7,100
16.9% 1,200
55% 3,905
518
$129.50
7,330
$366.50